Staff writer at The Atlantic. I focus on ways people and cities are adapting to the new economy. Former LAT reporter. Boston native. alana@theatlantic.com.

Can Business School Save a Company?

theatlantic.com — Cromona, KY-There's nothing easy about being a tiny print shop and newspaper publisher located in the mountains in rural eastern Kentucky, near the Virginia border. The delivery truck only comes once a month to drop off new supplies, it can be hard to find qualified employees, and you have to face all kinds of biases from outsiders who have pre-conceived notions about Appalachia.

Mad Men and Southern Writers: The Week in Pop-Culture Writing

theatlantic.com — Going Up? Elevator Scenes on Mad Men John Jurgensen | The Wall Street Journal " Mad Men is about rises and falls, professional and existential. " Why I Became a Southern Writer James Hannaham | Buzzfeed "Through the South, I tried to make sense of what seemed similarly wrong with the North."

The City That Believed in Desegregation

theatlantic.com — Hawthorne Elementary in Louisville, Kentucky, looks like what you might imagine a typical American suburban elementary school to be, with students' art projects displayed in the hallways and brightly colored rugs and kid-sized tables and chairs in the classrooms. It's located in a predominantly white neighborhood.

HOW I MADE IT: Heather Cocks and Jessica Morgan

articles.latimes.com — Timing was right for the creators of the snarky celebrity fashion blog Go Fug Yourself. (They translate 'fug' as 'fantastically ugly.') The gig: Heather Cocks, 33, and Jessica Morgan, 36, aka The Fug Girls, creators of the popular snarkoblog Go Fug Yourself.

Manual Labor, All Night Long: The Reality of Paying for College

theatlantic.com — LOUISVILLE, Ky.-Most college students are busy. But Alexis McLin's schedule is even more jam-packed than the average student's. One day last week, for instance, she attended a lab from 3 p.m. to 6:45, went to dinner with her mother, and then at midnight went in to work at UPS, where she sorts packages from midnight to 4:30 a.m.

How to Buy Things in the Future

theatlantic.com — Humans have been trying to figure out the easiest way to pay for things for a very long time. First, they traded goats and shells, then gold and coins, then they got fancy and upgraded to cardboard Diners Club cards-followed, eventually, by plastic ones.

A New Life for Dead Malls

theatlantic.com — In case you haven't heard, suburban malls are on the way out (sorry Paul Blart). Some have become abandoned wastelands popular for ruin porn. Others have been torn down and turned into industrial sites. According to Ellen Dunham-Jones, an architect and professor at Georgia Tech, there are about 1,200 enclosed malls in the United States, and about one-third of them are dead or dying.

$350 Million Might Not Be Enough to Save Las Vegas

finance.yahoo.com — LAS VEGAS-There's been a lot of hubbub about the effort tech whiz Tony Hsieh and his crack team of acolytes have put into revitalizing downtown Las Vegas. In case you missed it, Hsieh, the CEO of Zappos, in January 2012 announced that he was putting $350 million into the Downtown Project, which would fund new businesses in an economically depressed part of the city seven miles north of the Las Vegas Strip.

$350 Million Might Not Be Enough to Save Las Vegas

theatlantic.com — LAS VEGAS-There's been a lot of hubbub about the effort tech whiz Tony Hsieh and his crack team of acolytes have put into revitalizing downtown Las Vegas. In case you missed it, Hsieh, the CEO of Zappos, in January 2012 announced that he was putting $350 million into the Downtown Project, which would fund new businesses in an economically depressed part of the city seven miles north of the Las Vegas Strip.

Why Are People Still Building Sprawl?

theatlantic.com — LAS VEGAS-A decade ago, home builders put up thousands of new spacious stucco homes in the desert here, with marble countertops, ample square footage, and walk-in kitchen cupboards. Then the recession hit, the values of these homes plummeted, and economists talked of the overbuilding of Las Vegas.
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Mar 31, 2015

When roads get super broken, even Red States learn to love the gas tax. Well, some do, @russellberman writes. theatlantic.com/politics/archi…

Mar 31, 2015

Hmmm. Trevor Noah Criticized As Anti-Semitic Due to Twitter History j.mp/1IMj4Xv via @thr

Mar 31, 2015

Bizarre. The Missouri state auditor killed himself in February, now his former spokesman has done the same. Why? theatlantic.com/politics/archi…

Mar 31, 2015

Can Business School Save a Company? A CFO of a rural Kentucky printer goes to Babson to save his business. theatlantic.com/business/archi…

Mar 30, 2015

RT @NickTimiraos: Bank of Bird-in-Hand (Pennsylvania) is the only new bank to open in the US in the last 5 years on.wsj.com/1NvHHup pic.twitter.com/EtmvoMxHV1

Mar 28, 2015

RT @Joypress: Lovely @sarahlarson piece on what was lost in E Village fire. So many dilapidated much-loved bldgs on every block. newyorker.com/culture/sarah-…?

Mar 27, 2015

Boston has 77 (!) racially concentrated areas of affluence, where 90% or more of pop. is white, income is 4x poverty level. #LincolnCities

Mar 27, 2015

Reid's "public image, if he has one, is largely as a shambling bumbler, pallid + reed-voiced + prone to verbal gaffes." Well-put @mollyesque

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