Staff writer at The Atlantic. I write about people doing stuff. alana@theatlantic.com www.theatlantic.com/...

Cincinnati's Problem-Oriented Police Reform

theatlantic.com — CINCINNATI-Citizens were throwing stones and beer bottles at police officers in front of City Hall, and Maris Herold didn't understand what they wanted. She was a police officer herself, and knew that her department had made some missteps.

New York City's Public-Housing Crisis

theatlantic.com — Many of the city's enormous low-income residences are in need of millions and millions of dollars of repair work. Why are they still standing at all? Not so in New York City. Walk around virtually any neighborhood in New York, and you'll see a handful of brick high-rise buildings, usually clustered around a small green space.

New Balance Bought Its Own Commuter Rail Station

theatlantic.com — BOSTON-If you were in a generous mood, you might call the public transportation system here troubled. Otherwise, you'd call it an ancient, broke, disorganized, mess. The MBTA owes $9 billion in debt. Trains are old. They often can't run in the snow, which is problematic in a city that got 109 inches last winter.

'Game of Thrones' and 'Black Grantland': The Week in Pop-Culture Writing

theatlantic.com — Entertainment Highlights from seven days of reading about entertainment. Louisa Thomas | The Boxer and the Batterer Grantland "A boxer who wins like a dancer allegedly beats women like a pugilist. What are you supposed to do with this?" Stop Laughing at Old Movies, You $@%&ing Hipsters Amy Nicholson | L.A.

Who Will Care for America's Seniors?

theatlantic.com — Being a home-health aide is a lonely, difficult job, and the pay is miserable. But the country needs to find millions more people to do it. My grandfather broke his hip at age 87. At the time, he lived with my grandmother in western Massachusetts in a beautiful house they'd built themselves abutting a farm.

A Better Nursing Home Exists

theatlantic.com — CHELSEA, Ma.-The woman Barry Berman saw sitting in the dining room of the nursing home was not his mother. Or, at least, she was his mother, but didn't look anything like her. His mother was vivacious, or she had been until she was felled by a massive stroke and then pneumonia, so he'd moved her into a nursing home so she could recuperate.

Goldman Sachs' Plan to Save Struggling Small Businesses

nationaljournal.com — Cromona, Ky.-There's nothing easy about being a tiny print shop and newspaper publisher located in the mountains in rural eastern Kentucky, near the Virginia border. The delivery truck only comes once a month to drop off new supplies, it can be hard to find qualified employees, and you have to face all kinds of biases from outsiders who have pre-conceived notions about Appalachia.

The EITC Gives Low-Income Americans More Than Just Money

theatlantic.com — The Earned Income Tax Credit began in 1975 and was expanded dramatically in 1993 as part of President Clinton's anti-poverty policy. Put simply, the credit is a subsidy the federal government provides to those who work but earn very little.

Where the White People Live

theatlantic.com — How self-segregation and concentrated affluence became normal in America Last summer, the Michigan town of Grosse Pointe Park erected a farmer's market in the middle of one of the few remaining streets that allowed cars to pass between the tony suburb and the urban Detroit neighborhoods at its border.

Imagining a Post-Coal Appalachia

theatlantic.com — Can young people help the region thrive again? WHITESBURG, Ky.-For a long time, coal dominated this remote region of rolling hilltops and muddy roads near the Tennessee and Virginia borders. But when the nation started to move away from coal-fired power plants, and giant companies pulled up stakes and closed down mines, shedding 7,000 jobs in just three years, the people left too.
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May 29, 2015

RT @ofcaladan: By @AlanaSemuels: good piece on challenges faced by immigrants moving to cities without big immigrant populations theatlantic.com/business/archi…

May 29, 2015

RT @shoebotham: Cincinnati crime, arrests & complaints down | Community problem-oriented #policing 'CPOP' works. @AlanaSemuels http://t.co/…

May 29, 2015

Ohio is 50th in nation on policies that promote well-being of the undocumented, yet people still move there for jobs. theatlantic.com/business/archi…

May 29, 2015

As Rust Belt cities try to attract immigrants and grow population, some newcomers find it's a lonely life. My piece: theatlantic.com/business/archi…

May 28, 2015

RT @bourreelam: A really important and in-depth story on what successful police reform looks like by @AlanaSemuels twitter.com/AlanaSemuels/s…

May 28, 2015

What happens when you don't use broken windows. From a study of Cincinnati's police after forced reforms. pic.twitter.com/jqBaJlYG7W

May 28, 2015

With a new policing strategy, arrests plummeted in Cincinnati as they were rising in stop-and-frisk cities like NYC. theatlantic.com/politics/archi…

May 28, 2015

My deep dive on how Baltimore, Ferguson etc may be able to change their policing strategies by looking at Cincinnati. theatlantic.com/politics/archi…

May 28, 2015

RT @YAppelbaum: How do you fix a broken police department? As @AlanaSemuels discovered in Cincinnati, it’s not easy—but can be done: theatlantic.com/politics/archi…

May 27, 2015

In the wake of Bob Schieffer's comments about importance of local news, revisit my piece from November: theatlantic.com/business/archi… cc: @thefix

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