Architecture critic @Phillyinquirer, full-time city person, militant pedestrian, slow-moving cyclist. Did I really win 2014 Pulitzer? ingasaffron@gmail.com

Changing Skyline: University City reinvents itself - again - with apartments, offices and shops

philly.com — Maybe the third time will be the charm for the place we've grown used to calling University City. Originally an African American neighborhood known as Black Bottom, the portion between Market Street and Lancaster Avenue was a tight mesh of rowhouses and small businesses until the early 1960s, when it was leveled to provide growing room for Penn and Drexel.
Jan 31, 2016

They wrecked the nabe for urban renewal. Now they want to put it back. My column: bit.ly/1TroEpu

Changing Skyline: New apartment development near Temple finds a better way

philly.com — With conditions changing, you might expect the response to follow the usual Philadelphia script. Either the neighborhood would surrender to developers and allow a construction free-for-all. Or, it would dig in, using its political power to hold onto the acres of vacant land in the hope that someone, some day, might build subsidized housing.

Changing Skyline: University City reinvents itself - again - with apartments, offices and shops

philly.com — Maybe the third time will be the charm for the place we've grown used to calling University City. Originally an African American neighborhood known as Black Bottom, the portion between Market Street and Lancaster Avenue was a tight mesh of rowhouses and small businesses until the early 1960s, when it was leveled to provide growing room for Penn and Drexel.
Jan 29, 2016

Tech powers yet another redo of West Philadelphia renewal area fb.me/5CuqGghSg

Jan 29, 2016

They got rid of the nabe for urban renewal. Now they want to put it back in Philly's University City. My column: bit.ly/1TroEpu

Jan 29, 2016

Changing Skyline: University City reinvents itself - again - with apartments, offices and shops po.st/IVONwW via @phillydotcom

How Architects KieranTimberlake Turned Their Office Into an Incubator for New Ways of Working

metropolismag.com — James Timberlake and Stephen Kieran stand in the second-floor studio space of their 63,000-square-foot office. It's a late November day in Philadelphia, with temperatures in the high 40s, and I'm sitting with architects Stephen Kieran and Billie Faircloth at a conference table in KieranTimberlake 's soaring new offices in a former bottling plant.
Jan 27, 2016

Sweaty, but innovative. How forgoing AC shapes the culture & architecture @KIERANTMBERLK. My story in @MetropolisMag bit.ly/1PEUNKA

Jan 30, 2016

Philly water ice, weather stations and architectural innovation, all in one @MetropolisMag piece. bit.ly/1PEUNKA

Good Eye: Mansion District

philly.com — Posted: Saturday, January 23, 2016, 5:00 AM Mention the "Mansion District" to many Philadelphians, and they will assume you're talking about Rittenhouse Square or Chestnut Hill. The city's official Mansion District can actually be found in North Philadelphia, just a block below Temple University.
Jan 23, 2016

Something else that survived a blizzard: the N. Philly mansion district. Details in GoodEye. bit.ly/1Qr4drT pic.twitter.com/WjtukQ1hPf

Jan 24, 2016

The city's official Mansion District can actually be found in North Philadelphia, near Temple University. fb.me/2ai5B2Xt1

Jan 24, 2016

Among the things I learned in this @ingasaffron piece -Philly has an official mansion district -It's in North Philly mobile.philly.com/beta?wss=/phil…

Changing Skyline: The best and worst architecture of the Nutter era

philly.com — Now that the "Nutter Era" is officially past tense, and Jim Kenney is managing this obstreperous city, we'll be seeing a lot less of Michael Nutter, the person. Yet the architectural additions and deletions that occurred during his tenure will stay with us for a long time. What were its hallmarks?

Changing Skyline: The best and worst architecture of the Nutter era

philly.com — Now that the "Nutter Era" is officially past tense, and Jim Kenney is managing this obstreperous city, we'll be seeing a lot less of Michael Nutter, the person. Yet the architectural additions and deletions that occurred during his tenure will stay with us for a long time. What were its hallmarks?
Jan 22, 2016

What happened to Philly architecture during the Nutter years. My column: bit.ly/1RDbyG1

Jan 22, 2016

Suburbanization of the rowhouse, lasting legacy of the temporary & highs/lows of Philly's Nutter years. My listicle: bit.ly/1RDbyG1

Changing Skyline: Fighting the suburbanizing tide in Roxborough

philly.com — High above the Schuylkill, in the Ridge Park section of Roxborough, old millworker houses sit side by side with wood-trimmed Victorian mansions. The little houses are jammed together as tightly as crayons in a box, but they typically sit back from the street, often behind postage-stamp gardens, and many have snug porches or high stoops.
Jan 15, 2016

RT @PhillyInquirer: Roxborough residents fight to keep gardens + stoops when garages + parking pads come to the 'hood. via @IngaSaffron mobile.philly.com/beta?wss=/phil…

Jan 15, 2016

How Philly's Roxborough is fighting to keep its charm and stop front parking. My column: bit.ly/1lci2gT pic.twitter.com/FTf3dK35sO

Jan 15, 2016

RT @billy_penn: .@IngaSaffron: "Story in Roxborough isn't all that different from what's happening in Graduate Hospital or Fishtown" ow.ly/X77ro

Jan 18, 2016

How a Philly nabe found a way to fight front garages & tear-downs. My column: bit.ly/1lci2gT pic.twitter.com/ZYOlINkDVh

Changing Skyline: Fighting the suburbanizing tide in Roxborough

philly.com — High above the Schuylkill, in the Ridge Park section of Roxborough, old millworker houses sit side by side with wood-trimmed Victorian mansions. The little houses are jammed together as tightly as crayons in a box, but they typically sit back from the str - Inga Saffron, Philadelphia Inquirer
Jan 15, 2016

Can Neighborhood Conservation Overlay save Roxborough from suburbanizing development? fb.me/73i8EPRfa

Boot & Saddle sign back with all lights blazin'

philly.com — Posted: Wednesday, January 13, 2016, 3:01 AM One of the best-loved relics of Philadelphia's recent past, the neon Boot & Saddle sign on South Broad Street, is glowing again. The sign came out with all its lights blazing Saturday night, nearly eight months after it was taken down from the facade of the music club at Ellsworth Street.
More Articles →
Feb 05, 2016

@von_Levi Path of least resistance. Highways were put in just as ports were shifting out of downtowns. There was no constituency for better.

Feb 05, 2016

At some point, downtown highways become real estate that are too valuable to drive cars on. bit.ly/1PF0Hte

Feb 05, 2016

The Greta Garbo of developers slips a tower onto Philly's Walnut Street. My column: bit.ly/1NRUaG1 pic.twitter.com/yohOQGycFc

Feb 04, 2016

How did this tower sneak into downtown Philly without anyone knowing? My column: bit.ly/1NRUaG1 pic.twitter.com/B4HkgWvnyC

Feb 04, 2016

@MarketUrbanism It's two blocks from a walkable rowhouse neighborhood.

Feb 04, 2016

@JamesPJennings Saw that! (Good get!) But the Boyd tower is even more ambitious.

Feb 04, 2016

What if they built a skyscraper in Center City & didn't tell anyone? My column: bit.ly/1NRUaG1 pic.twitter.com/6f8I7sguXU


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