Steve Mirsky on Muck Rack

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New York City
Editor, Columnist, and Podcaster — Scientific American
As seen in:  Scientific American

Editor, columnist and podcaster for Scientific American @sciam magazine. Opinions expressed are my own and are subject to revision with new information.

There's Gold in Them Thar Hills of Solid Waste

scientificamerican.com — A cloud with a silver lining pales next to solid waste laced with gold You can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear. You can't make chicken salad out of chicken-shall we agree we know what word goes at the end of that saying?

Dolphin Deaths Linked To 2010 Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill

scientificamerican.com — Unusual adrenal and lung conditions seen in dead dolphins in the months after the 2010 BP Gulf of Mexico oil spill point to the oil as the cause. Steve Mirsky reports. The BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill began in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010.

First Woman MLBer Will Probably Pitch

scientificamerican.com — Contemporary women's baseball chronicler Jennifer Ring says the fastest women pitchers currently hit speeds in the 80s (mph) and it keeps going up. Steve Mirsky reports. In 2010 the U.S. fielded a baseball team to compete in the Women's Baseball World Cup in Caracas. Not softball- baseball.

Animals Don't Use Facebook But They Have Social Networks Too

scientificamerican.com — Lee Dugatkin, evolutionary biologist and behavioral ecologist at the University of Louisville, talks about his article in the June issue of Scientific American called The Networked Animal , about how social networks in disparate animals species affect the lives of the entire group and its individual members.

Netflix CEO Peers At Crystal Ball To See TV's Future

scientificamerican.com — Reed Hastings, CEO of Netflix, gave his view of the next couple of decades in the evolution of TV-watching at the re:publica 15 digital culture conference in Berlin on May 5th. "Sometimes things are very stable, and then they change a lot." Reed Hastings, the CEO of Netflix.

May 9 Is Big Day for the Birds

scientificamerican.com — Cornell Lab of Ornithology's Chris Wood explains the May 9 Global Big Day event, in which birders worldwide are invited to spot birds and upload their findings to the eBird database.

A Given Chair Can Be Sublime, Seafaring or Just Silly

scientificamerican.com — Some chairs you would want of wood, some chairs you would not want The electric, push button-operated reclining chair (as opposed to the plain old electric chair) is clearly one of the hallmarks of an advanced civilization.

Mississippi Mound Builders Meet the 33rd Legion

scientificamerican.com — Astronomer Alan Smale spends his days at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center exploring celestial objects, but he's also the author of Clash of Eagles, an alternate-history novel in which a Roman Legion invades North America.

Shakespeare to Blame for Introduction of European Starlings to U.S.

scientificamerican.com — Brought here on a lark, starlings are now at every turn Whistle. Pop. Whirrrr. Zzzt. Repeat. Many, many, many times. That's the song, if you want to call it that, of the European starling. Two of these relatively drab, chunky little birds are now my next-door neighbors-the pair moved into a hole in the maple tree in front of my house.

Nobelist Talks About Exercise and Chromosome Integrity

scientificamerican.com — In a Google Hangout, Nobel Laureate Elizabeth Blackburn and Scientific American editor-in-chief Mariette DiChristina discuss the relationship between exercise and telomere length, which is related to diseases of aging. Telomeres are parts of chromosomes that protect the ends of the chromosomes. They're often likened to the aglets at the ends of shoelaces.
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May 29, 2015

@tvjrennie "Remember: it's not a lie...if you believe it."–George Costanza

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