Ari Shapiro on Muck Rack

Ari Shapiro Verified

London, England
International Correspondent — NPR

Starting in September, host of @NPR's All Things Considered. Also, occasional guest-singer with @PinkMartiniBand.

In Seoul, Where Everything Moves Fast, There's Also Longing For The Past

wvpublic.org — Anytime I need to update a bunch of apps on my smartphone, I'm going to fly to South Korea to do it. I'm only partly joking. The Internet speeds are so fast here, they make me feel like the U.S. is living in the past. And it's not just the Internet.

In Seoul, Where Everything Moves Fast, There's Also Longing For The Past

npr.org — Anytime I need to update a bunch of apps on my smartphone, I'm going to fly to South Korea to do it. I'm only partly joking. The Internet speeds are so fast here, they make me feel like the U.S. is living in the past. And it's not just the Internet.
Aug 02, 2015

Sadly, @AriShapiro's whirlwind stint in #Seoul has already ended. :( But he posted his observations before he left npr.org/sections/paral…

Aug 02, 2015

RT @elisewho: Sadly, @AriShapiro's whirlwind stint in #Seoul has already ended. :( But he posted his observations before he left npr.org/sections/paral…

Aug 02, 2015

RT @hanbae: Definitely rings true. @arishapiro: In Seoul, Where Everything Moves Fast, There's Also Longing For The Past n.pr/1IumKLl

In Seoul, Where Everything Moves Fast, There's Also Longing For The Past

wnyc.org — · by Ari Shapiro From Anytime I need to update a bunch of apps on my smartphone, I'm going to fly to South Korea to do it. I'm only partly joking. The Internet speeds are so fast here, they make me feel like the U.S. is living in the past.

South Koreans Bristle At Growing Dominance Of Family-Run Conglomerates

npr.org — In South Korea, a small number of family-run conglomerates dominate the economy. The biggest started as a village store in 1938. It's still controlled by the same family, and it's now a household name: Samsung.

South Koreans Bristle At Growing Dominance Of Family-Run Conglomerates

wnyc.org — In South Korea, a small number of family-run conglomerates dominate the economy. The biggest started as a village store in 1938. It's still controlled by the same family, and it's now a household name: Samsung.

Buddhist Nuns Preserve Tradition Of Korean Temple Food

huffingtonpost.com — Detox diets come and go, like any other fad. In South Korea, one popular diet has staying power. It has been around for at least 1,600 years, ever since the founding of the Jinkwansa temple in the mountains outside of Seoul. This Buddhist monastery sits at the convergence of two streams, amid twisting leafy trees and soaring peaks.

Detoxing The Buddhist Way: Nuns Preserve Art Of Korean Temple Food

ww2.kqed.org — Listen to the Story on Morning Edition: http://pd.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/me/2015/07/20150723_me_detoxing_the_buddhist_way_nuns_preserve_art_of_korean_temple_food.mp3 Detox diets come and go, like any other fad. In South Korea, one popular diet has staying power. It has been around for at least 1,600 years, ever since the founding of the Jingkwansa temple in the mountains outside of Seoul.

Detoxing The Buddhist Way: Nuns Preserve Art Of Korean Temple Food

wlrn.org — Detox diets come and go, like any other fad. In South Korea, one popular diet has staying power. It has been around for at least 1,600 years, ever since the founding of the Jingkwansa temple in the mountains outside of Seoul. This Buddhist monastery sits at the convergence of two streams, amid twisting leafy trees and soaring peaks.

Detoxing The Buddhist Way: Nuns Preserve Art Of Korean Temple Food

wabe.org — Detox diets come and go, like any other fad. In South Korea, one popular diet has staying power. It has been around for at least 1,600 years, ever since the founding of the Jingkwansa temple in the mountains outside of Seoul. This Buddhist monastery sits at the convergence of two streams, amid twisting leafy trees and soaring peaks.

Detoxing The Buddhist Way: Nuns Preserve Art Of Korean Temple Food

kcur.org — Detox diets come and go, like any other fad. In South Korea, one popular diet has staying power. It has been around for at least 1,600 years, ever since the founding of the Jingkwansa temple in the mountains outside of Seoul. This Buddhist monastery sits at the convergence of two streams, amid twisting leafy trees and soaring peaks.
More Articles →
Aug 02, 2015

RT @hanbae: Definitely rings true. @arishapiro: In Seoul, Where Everything Moves Fast, There's Also Longing For The Past n.pr/1IumKLl

Aug 02, 2015

RT @elisewho: Sadly, @AriShapiro's whirlwind stint in #Seoul has already ended. :( But he posted his observations before he left npr.org/sections/paral…

Aug 02, 2015

The person in London who I love most (and will miss most when I leave) is this week's guest on Desert Island Discs: bbc.in/1KITWFA

Aug 01, 2015

I am eating sweet potato ice cream served IN A SWEET POTATO. How crazy is that??? (Take note, @saltandstraw.) pic.twitter.com/SfKXIQzltQ

Aug 01, 2015

Incredible juxtapositions of old & new here. Emerge from a gallery of Buddhist statues to this @olafureliasson piece. pic.twitter.com/FxPuKnVGGb

Jul 31, 2015

RT @lorihwilson: Can we have this @NPRpchh team more often? @arishapiro saying, "News flash: @Bob_Mondello applauds Liza Minnelli" = highlight of my commute!

Jul 31, 2015

RT @idislikestephen: New Pop Culture Happy Hour! @arishapiro and @bob_mondello join us to talk music, movies, and music in movies: npr.org/sections/monke… #PCHH

Jul 31, 2015

I just watched a man sprinkle vodka all over the entrance to his restaurant in Seoul. "Why did you do that?" "Buddha."

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