Jonathan Amos on Muck Rack

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Cambridge, UK
Science Correspondent — BBC
As seen in:  BBC

BBC Science Correspondent

Bloodhound car begins to take shape

bbc.co.uk — The world's fastest car is starting to look like the real thing. Engineers have just test-fitted the nose cone to the Bloodhound vehicle, now taking shape at its design centre in Bristol in the west of England. The team expects to be conducting low-speed trials with the finished car on an airport runway in August.

SpaceX launches electric satellites

bbc.co.uk — US rocket company SpaceX has performed its first dual-satellite mission. The firm's Falcon 9 vehicle put up two telecommunications spacecraft on Monday (GMT) - one for Eutelsat and one for the Asia Broadcast Satellite operator. Both spacecraft will use electric engines to get into their final orbital positions 36,000km above the equator.

Drone varrerá Amazônia em busca de civilizações antigas

bbc.co.uk — Cientistas britânicos vão usar um drone para fazer varreduras na Amazônia brasileira e procurar vestígios de civilizações antigas. O avião não-tripulado que será enviado para a região é equipado com um laser que analisa e procura por áreas onde podem ter existido construções há milhares de anos.

Synthetic vaccine sought to finally eradicate polio

bbc.com — An international team of scientists is to try to develop a wholly artificial vaccine to combat polio. The disease is very close to being eradicated, with only a few hundred cases now reported worldwide each year. The hope is that the new approach can address some shortcomings in an existing vaccine, and so help eliminate polio altogether.

Satellites track snail disease risk

bbc.com — Scientists are tracking snails from space in a bid to combat the spread of parasitic disease in Africa. The satellite information is being used to predict where infections are likely to occur, enabling health agencies to better target their resources. It is one example of the growing influence of space-borne data in new healthcare applications.

Satellites track snail disease risk

bbc.co.uk — Scientists are tracking snails from space in a bid to combat the spread of parasitic disease in Africa. The satellite information is being used to predict where infections are likely to occur, enabling health agencies to better target their resources. It is one example of the growing influence of space-borne data in new healthcare applications.

Collider hopes for a 'super' restart

bbc.com — A senior researcher at the Large Hadron Collider says a new particle could be detected this year that is even more exciting than the Higgs boson. The accelerator is due to come back online in March after an upgrade that has given it a big boost in energy.

Collider hopes for a 'super' restart

bbc.co.uk — A senior researcher at the Large Hadron Collider says a new particle could be detected this year that is even more exciting than the Higgs boson. The accelerator is due to come back online in March after an upgrade that has given it a big boost in energy.

'Next Pinatubo' a test of geoengineering

bbc.com — Scientists who study ideas to engineer the climate to mitigate global warming say we should be ready to deploy an armada of instrumentation when Earth has its next major volcanic eruption. Data gathered in the high atmosphere would be invaluable in determining whether so-called "geoengineering" solutions had any merit at all.

'Next Pinatubo' a test of geoengineering

bbc.co.uk — Scientists who study ideas to engineer the climate to mitigate global warming say we should be ready to deploy an armada of instrumentation when Earth has its next major volcanic eruption. Data gathered in the high atmosphere would be invaluable in determining whether so-called "geoengineering" solutions had any merit at all.
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Mar 02, 2015

@suthers @ruthie147 My biggest problem right now is a forgotten coffee thermos flask. Smells like an astrobiology experiment gone very bad.

Mar 02, 2015

@suthers @ruthie147 What scared me most was that I might have written the term in previous copy. I checked. I haven't. I wrote "lag". Phew.

Mar 02, 2015

RT @NASAJPL: @BBCAmos Checked with PI Chris Russell. Yes, this is possible, but we won't know for sure until we get closer and obtain higher-res images

Mar 02, 2015

@NASAJPL Thanks, and as my planetary sub-editor @elakdawalla point out - it's "lag" deposits. Where would we be without her?

Mar 02, 2015

@elakdawalla Ha! It's called typing faster than the synapses can connect. Hope things find you well!

Mar 02, 2015

#asknasa Is it possible a meteoroid impact has pierced the slag deposits at the surface of Ceres to reveal subsurface ices?

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