New York Times columnist. Author of a dozen books and numerous articles for the New York Times and magazines.

Carl Zimmer's Biography

Carl Zimmer is a columnist for the New York Times, where his "Matter" column appears each week. He also writes for magazines such as National Geographic and Wired and is the author of a dozen books. Zimmer joined the staff of Discover in 1990 and served there as a senior editor from 1995 to 1999 (he remains a contributing editor). Zimmer has earned awards from the National Academies and the ...

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How Scientists Stalked a Lethal Superbug-With the Killer's Own DNA | Wired Science | Wired.com

How Scientists Stalked a Lethal Superbug-With the Killer's Own DNA | Wired Science | Wired.com

What was your first job as a journalist?

Summer intern at the Hunterdon County Democrat

Have you ever used a typewriter?

I actually owned a manual typewriter as a kid.

How is social media changing news?

The audience is no longer silent. News has become a conversation.

The Surprising Origins of Life’s Complexity

quantamagazine.org — Scientists are exploring how organisms can evolve elaborate structures without Darwinian selection. Charles Darwin was not yet 30 when he got the basic idea for the theory of evolution. But it wasn't until he turned 50 that he presented his argument to the world.
Jul 16, 2015

RT @QuantaMagazine: Two years ago today, Quanta Magazine launched with its new name and site, and with this article by @carlzimmer: quantamagazine.org/20130716-the-s…

A Social Parasite’s Sophisticated Mimicry

nytimes.com — An ant colony is an insect fortress: When enemies invade, soldier ants quickly detect the incursion and rip their foes apart with their oversize mandibles. But some invaders manage to slip in with ease, none more mystifyingly than the ant nest beetle. Adult beetles stride into an ant colony in search of a mate, without being harassed.
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Scientists Demonstrate Animal Mind-Melds

nytimes.com — A single neuron can't do much on its own, but link billions of them together into a network and you've got a brain. But why stop there? In recent years, scientists have wondered what brains could do if they were linked together into even bigger networks. Miguel A.
Jul 09, 2015

New studies say rats and monkeys whose brains are linked by electrodes can coordinate their brains to carry out tasks nyti.ms/1fqxrIl

Jul 09, 2015

RT @mzrowan: "If a brain network were to commit a crime, for example, who exactly would be guilty?" nytimes.com/2015/07/14/sci…

Jul 09, 2015

Just think: if we could network our brains, we might be able to tweet even stupider jokes. nyti.ms/1fqxrIl

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Carl Zimmer’s Brief Guide to Writing Explainers

theopennotebook.com — Editors' note: Every great science story is different, but there are some fundamentals that most of the best stories in any genre share. Today The Open Notebook is launching a new series of brief guides aimed at capturing the essential elements of various story forms. Award-winning writer Carl Zimmer starts us off with a guide to one of science journalism's core forms-the explainer.]
Jul 07, 2015

RT @Open_Notebook: Today @Open_Notebook, @carlzimmer on what makes a good explainer, the 1st piece in our new series of "brief guides.” theopennotebook.com/2015/07/07/zim…

Jul 07, 2015

The opening metaphor in this piece on explanatory journalism shows why @carlzimmer is the best at it: theopennotebook.com/2015/07/07/zim…

Jul 07, 2015

Yes: “Most important step is to figure out the minimum amount of explanation needed to understand your overall piece” theopennotebook.com/2015/07/07/zim…

Jul 07, 2015

RT @Open_Notebook: Today @Open_Notebook, @carlzimmer on what makes a good explainer, the 1st piece in our new series of "brief guides.” theopennotebook.com/2015/07/07/zim…

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The Cambrian Explosion’s Strange-Looking Poster Child

nytimes.com — The animal kingdom got off to a slow start. Studies on DNA indicate that the first animals evolved more than 750 million years ago, but for well over 200 million years, they left a meager mark on the fossil record.
Jul 02, 2015

The Cambrian Explosion’s poster children for weirdness are starting to make sense—my new @nytimes column: nytimes.com/2015/07/07/sci…

Jul 02, 2015

RT @carlzimmer: The Cambrian Explosion’s poster children for weirdness are starting to make sense—my new @nytimes column: nytimes.com/2015/07/07/sci…

Jul 02, 2015

.@carlzimmer on the Cambrian Explosion's strange-looking poster child, and its stranger-looking poster siblings. nytimes.com/2015/07/07/sci…

The Brain: Look Deep Into the Mind's Eye

Jun 22, 2015

RT @Catelli_NQU: Ever since I read this discovermagazine.com/2010/mar/23-th… by @carlzimmer I wanted to know more. Having it, but not knowing anything about it was lonely

Picture This? Some Just Can’t

nytimes.com — Certain people, researchers have discovered, can't summon up mental images - it's as if their mind's eye is blind. This month in the journal Cortex, the condition received a name: aphantasia, based on the Greek word phantasia, which Aristotle used to describe the power that presents visual imagery to our minds.
Jun 22, 2015

A career high: I had a small part in the identification of a new condition with an awesome name: aphantasia mobile.nytimes.com/2015/06/23/sci…

Jun 22, 2015

RT @carlzimmer: A career high: I had a small part in the identification of a new condition with an awesome name: aphantasia mobile.nytimes.com/2015/06/23/sci…

Jun 22, 2015

RT @vaughanbell: .@carlzimmer on people with no mental imagery nytimes.com/2015/06/23/sci… We found this in congenital prosopagnosia in '09 dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neul…

Jun 22, 2015

Some people can't "see" mental images – & now the condition has a name mobile.nytimes.com/2015/06/23/sci…

Jun 22, 2015

RT @carlzimmer: A career high: I had a small part in the identification of a new condition with an awesome name: aphantasia mobile.nytimes.com/2015/06/23/sci…

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I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (20 June 2015)

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Top picks Hazing Ravens With Lasers: A Humane Way to Save Baby Tortoises?" By Chris Clarke. The genome of Kennewick Man rekindles a legal feud- coverage from Carl Zimmer and Ewen Callaway.
Jun 20, 2015

Every week I scour the Internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don’t have to. Here’s this week’s cache phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/06/20/ive…

MERS Virus Migrates to One More Country. What Will Contain It?

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — A respiratory virus that originates in the Middle East and has been hopscotching the globe for three years has today landed in yet another country, just as international health officials are raising concerns about the conditions that allow it to spread.

Baboon-Trackers Herald New Age of Animal Behaviour Research

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Picture a troop of olive baboons, moving over the savannah. There's around fifty of them, and they cover a lot of ground as they search for grass, seeds, insects, and other bits of food. They need to stick together so they don't get eaten, but different animals might want to head in different directions at any one time.
Jun 18, 2015

GPS collars show how baboons make decisions when moving. They also herald a new age in animal behaviour research. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/06/18/bab…

Jun 18, 2015

RT @edyong209: GPS collars show how baboons make decisions when moving. They also herald a new age in animal behaviour research. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/06/18/bab…

Jun 18, 2015

Baboon-Trackers Herald New Age of Animal Behaviour Research on.natgeo.com/1SsELRH via by @edyong209

Jun 19, 2015

“It’s hard enough to get two adults and two kids into the car at the same time let alone 50 baboons who can’t talk.” phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/06/18/bab…

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Jul 29, 2015

RT @mbalter: Rich American tourists kill hundreds of lions each year, and it's all legal wpo.st/aPqS0

Jul 29, 2015

RT @pknoepfler: The boom in mini stomachs, brains, breasts, kidneys and more nature.com/news/the-boom-… Organoids & more.

Jul 29, 2015

RT @Jamie_Woodward_: Denisova Cave - the only site with evidence of Neanderthals, Denisovans & modern humans siberiantimes.com/science/casest… http://…

Jul 28, 2015

RT @roseveleth: What if your face was connected to your credit score, dating profile, bank account? gizmodo.com/https-www-yout… pic.twitter.com/B79ncSwjEK

Jul 28, 2015

RT @stevesilberman: American dentist lures one of Zimbabwe's most beloved lions out of national park and kills him with a bow and arrow. telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews…

Jul 28, 2015

RT @Revkin: .@CenterForBioDiv sees Huge rise in GOP attacks on Endangered Species Act & protected species. biologicaldiversity.org/campaigns/esa_… http://t.…

Jul 27, 2015

@Havermeyer I hear ya. A semi-permanent glut of good reading.



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