Carl Zimmer on Muck Rack

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New York Times columnist. Author of a dozen books and numerous articles for the New York Times and magazines.

Carl Zimmer's Biography

Carl Zimmer is a columnist for the New York Times, where his "Matter" column appears each week. He also writes for magazines such as National Geographic and Wired and is the author of a dozen books. Zimmer joined the staff of Discover in 1990 and served there as a senior editor from 1995 to 1999 (he remains a contributing editor). Zimmer has earned awards from the National Academies and the ...

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How Scientists Stalked a Lethal Superbug-With the Killer's Own DNA | Wired Science | Wired.com

How Scientists Stalked a Lethal Superbug-With the Killer's Own DNA | Wired Science | Wired.com

What was your first job as a journalist?

Summer intern at the Hunterdon County Democrat

Have you ever used a typewriter?

I actually owned a manual typewriter as a kid.

How is social media changing news?

The audience is no longer silent. News has become a conversation.

Warming Oceans Putting Marine Life ‘In a Blender’

nytimes.com — Up in Maine, lobsters are thriving. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission reported last month that stocks there have reached a record high. Down the coast, however, the story is different. In southern New England, lobster stocks have plummeted to the lowest levels ever recorded, putting many lobstermen out of business.
Sep 03, 2015

Warming Oceans Putting Marine Life ‘In a Blender’ nyti.ms/1LY53eu

Sep 03, 2015

We may be turning the world’s oceans into an ecological blender. That’s the subject of my @nytimes column this week: nytimes.com/2015/09/08/sci…

Fighting the Second Skeleton

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva is an incredibly rare disease, striking just one out of every two million people. It's also an incredibly astonishing disease. A single mutation to a single gene causes muscles to spontaneously turn into new bones. Over time, people with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP for short) grow a second skeleton-one that can cut their lives short.
Sep 02, 2015

Fighting the Second Skeleton. @carlzimmer on recent findings on FOP, the strange bone disease he wrote of in 2013. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/02/fig…

Sep 02, 2015

On the Loom, I offer the latest chapter in the story of FOP, a disease that makes you grow a second skeleton. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/02/fig…

Sep 02, 2015

RT @carlzimmer: On the Loom, I offer the latest chapter in the story of FOP, a disease that makes you grow a second skeleton. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/02/fig…

Show 1 more tweet from Deborah Blum

The Slow Process of Countering the Emerald Ash Borer

nytimes.com — In 2001, ash trees began dying in Detroit, and no one could say why. Then glittering green beetles were discovered crawling out of an ash log. American scientists had never seen the beetles, and they reached out to experts around the world for help.
Aug 27, 2015

The emerald ash borer is an ecological nightmare in the U.S, but not in Asia. I wrote about the chemical reasons why. nytimes.com/2015/09/01/sci…

Aug 27, 2015

Trees are chemical warriors. So why can’t American ash trees win against emerald ash borers? My new @nytimes column: nytimes.com/2015/09/01/sci…

Aug 27, 2015

See ya baseball bats MT "@carlzimmer: Trees are chemical warriors. So why can’t ash trees beat emerald ash borers? nytimes.com/2015/09/01/sci…

Aug 27, 2015

RT @carlzimmer: The emerald ash borer is an ecological nightmare in the U.S, but not in Asia. I wrote about the chemical reasons why. nytimes.com/2015/09/01/sci…

Show 4 more tweets from Nirmal Ghosh, Ed Yong and others...

Evolving a Defense, Mimics Save Themselves

nytimes.com — The Canadian tiger swallowtail caterpillar is a plump green creature that spends all its time munching leaves. It ought to be an easy meal for a bird, yet many birds pass it by. The caterpillar is protected by a remarkable defense, researchers have found: It tricks birds into thinking it's a snake.
Aug 20, 2015

To understand the evolution of deception, understand the mind of the deceived. Me in @nytimes nytimes.com/2015/08/25/sci… pic.twitter.com/RRSd6lzpJt

Aug 21, 2015

RT @NYTScience: Some mimics in nature engage in mimicry overkill. Scientists think they've figured out why nyti.ms/1MHheMX pic.twitter.com/xrn6fkIkMZ

How Autistic People Helped Shape the Modern World

wired.com — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in 68 children in the US are on the autism spectrum, a number that stands in staggering contrast to a 1970 study that put the figure at one in 14,200. Some people believe we're in the middle of an autism epidemic.
Aug 21, 2015

RT @colinmeloy: Guys, @stevesilberman’s new book “NeuroTribes” is MUST-READ. Celebrate neurodiversity! wired.com/2015/08/neurot…

Aug 20, 2015

In @WIRED I talk to @stevesilberman about his fascinating new book about autism, “NeuroTribes” wired.com/2015/08/neurot…

Show 13 more tweets from Steve Silberman, Maia Szalavitz and others...

Importing Both Salamanders and Their Potential Destruction

nytimes.com — We humans can drive species toward extinction by hunting them or destroying their habitat. But we can also threaten them in a more subtle but no less dangerous way: by making them sick. In the early 1900s, humans introduced malaria-spreading mosquitoes to Hawaii, and many native bird species were decimated.
Jul 30, 2015

For my @nytimes column this week: how to avoid a salamander apocalypse. nytimes.com/2015/08/04/sci…

Show 3 more tweets from Aleszu Bajak, Nirmal Ghosh and others...

The Surprising Origins of Life’s Complexity

quantamagazine.org — Scientists are exploring how organisms can evolve elaborate structures without Darwinian selection. Charles Darwin was not yet 30 when he got the basic idea for the theory of evolution. But it wasn't until he turned 50 that he presented his argument to the world.
Jul 16, 2015

RT @QuantaMagazine: Two years ago today, Quanta Magazine launched with its new name and site, and with this article by @carlzimmer: quantamagazine.org/20130716-the-s…

A Social Parasite’s Sophisticated Mimicry

nytimes.com — An ant colony is an insect fortress: When enemies invade, soldier ants quickly detect the incursion and rip their foes apart with their oversize mandibles. But some invaders manage to slip in with ease, none more mystifyingly than the ant nest beetle. Adult beetles stride into an ant colony in search of a mate, without being harassed.
Show 3 more tweets from Emily Mathieu, Brooke Borel and others...

Scientists Demonstrate Animal Mind-Melds

nytimes.com — A single neuron can't do much on its own, but link billions of them together into a network and you've got a brain. But why stop there? In recent years, scientists have wondered what brains could do if they were linked together into even bigger networks. Miguel A.
Jul 09, 2015

New studies say rats and monkeys whose brains are linked by electrodes can coordinate their brains to carry out tasks nyti.ms/1fqxrIl

Jul 09, 2015

RT @mzrowan: "If a brain network were to commit a crime, for example, who exactly would be guilty?" nytimes.com/2015/07/14/sci…

Jul 09, 2015

Just think: if we could network our brains, we might be able to tweet even stupider jokes. nyti.ms/1fqxrIl

Show 5 more tweets from Jennifer Ouellette, Maria Popova and others...

Carl Zimmer’s Brief Guide to Writing Explainers

theopennotebook.com — Editors' note: Every great science story is different, but there are some fundamentals that most of the best stories in any genre share. Today The Open Notebook is launching a new series of brief guides aimed at capturing the essential elements of various story forms. Award-winning writer Carl Zimmer starts us off with a guide to one of science journalism's core forms-the explainer.]
Jul 07, 2015

RT @Open_Notebook: Today @Open_Notebook, @carlzimmer on what makes a good explainer, the 1st piece in our new series of "brief guides.” theopennotebook.com/2015/07/07/zim…

Jul 07, 2015

The opening metaphor in this piece on explanatory journalism shows why @carlzimmer is the best at it: theopennotebook.com/2015/07/07/zim…

Jul 07, 2015

Yes: “Most important step is to figure out the minimum amount of explanation needed to understand your overall piece” theopennotebook.com/2015/07/07/zim…

Jul 07, 2015

RT @Open_Notebook: Today @Open_Notebook, @carlzimmer on what makes a good explainer, the 1st piece in our new series of "brief guides.” theopennotebook.com/2015/07/07/zim…

Show 7 more tweets from Carl Zimmer, Jennifer Ouellette and others...
More Articles →
Sep 03, 2015

@fgrazz I blame autocorrect. I always, always blame autocorrect. (Thanks!)

Sep 03, 2015

Iowa State, I’m heading your way! Come hear me talk about science, doubt, and denial on Sept. 17 news.iastate.edu/news/2015/09/0…

Sep 03, 2015

@MaerynObley @nytimes That’s another important factor that will be interacting with climate change.

Sep 03, 2015

We may be turning the world’s oceans into an ecological blender. That’s the subject of my @nytimes column this week: nytimes.com/2015/09/08/sci…

Sep 03, 2015

Interesting…Don DeLillo’s next novel appears to be about cryonics or something like it. catalog.simonandschuster.com/TitleDetails/T… via @PublishersLunch

Sep 02, 2015

RT @StartsWithABang: CONFIRMED: The Big Bang's Last Great Prediction! medium.com/starts-with-a-… Cosmic neutrino background, for REAL! pic.twitter.com/S3WzsvlKZ5

Sep 02, 2015

On the Loom, I offer the latest chapter in the story of FOP, a disease that makes you grow a second skeleton. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/02/fig…


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