Most talked about Ars Technica stories

Where and how do Ars staffers work? Our computers, let us show you them!

arstechnica.com — Our quick " Chairs Technica" write up last Thanksgiving was a hit, and we all enjoyed showing you all the different awesome places where we put our butts while working. This year, though, we wanted to give you something a little more interesting to look at: our computers and desks.
Nov 27, 2014

Where and how do Ars staffers work? Our computers, let us show you them! ars.to/1ATRJ4O

Nov 27, 2014

Take a look at our desks, and check out my magnificent collection of Dota 2 plushies arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/1…

Show 4 more tweets from Cyrus Farivar, Cyrus Farivar and others...

Far Cry 4 review: it’s déjà vu all over again, and I love it

arstechnica.com — If it were any other game, I'd be pissed off. Far Cry 4 is not Far Cry 4. I mean, yes, it's called that on the box, but that's not what it is, not really. It's Far Cry 3 Service Pack 1. Perhaps Far Cry 3.5.

European parliament votes in favor of breaking up Google

arstechnica.com — In a vote on Thursday, European Parliament members voted 384 to 174 in favor of a resolution that calls for the unbundling of search engines from other commercial services to ensure competition among online companies. Although Google is not named specifically in the resolution, it's clearly targeted at the dominant search engine.
Nov 27, 2014

RT @arstechnica: European parliament votes in favor of breaking up Google ars.to/1HITgMH by @MeganGeuss

Preview: Office for Android tablets is like Office for iPad, but on Android

arstechnica.com — Google's Docs, Sheets, and Slides apps are a lot of things-they're fast, they're convenient, and they're available on both iOS and Android-but you couldn't call them "powerful." Even the Web versions of Google's productivity software are pretty basic compared with the feature-stuffed behemoth that is Microsoft Office, and the mobile apps are minimalist by comparison.

Murder-for-hire suspect gets new ACLU ally in battle against phone spying

arstechnica.com — In a new court filing, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has jumped into the criminal case of a man who federal prosecutors allege orchestrated a murder-for-hire earlier this year in Baltimore, Maryland.

Former HP CEO responsible for Compaq merger explores 2016 presidential bid

arstechnica.com — Carly Fiorina, the former CEO of Hewlett-Packard who brought about the industry-changing merger with Compaq, is laying the groundwork for an attempt to snag the Republican nomination in the 2016 US presidential race.
Nov 26, 2014

Former #HP CEO responsible for Compaq merger explores 2016 presidential bid ow.ly/EWoaT #icarly #GOP (via Ars)

Sony Pictures hackers release list of stolen corporate files

arstechnica.com — On Monday, employees at Sony Pictures Entertainment-the television and movie subsidiary of Sony Corp.-discovered that their internal corporate network had been hijacked. A message from an individual or group claiming responsibility appeared on corporate systems, pledging to release sensitive corporate data taken from the network by 11pm GMT on Monday.
Nov 26, 2014

Sony Pictures hackers release list of stolen corporate files ars.to/120Mktd

Better than shade: Rooftop material sheds heat into space

arstechnica.com — Transforming our electricity generation to renewable sources is rightly the focus of most discussions about the future of energy, but the greenest kilowatt-hour is the one not used in the first place. Yes, there are all kinds of ways to reduce energy consumption, and smarter building designs that do more with less are among those.
Nov 26, 2014

RT @arstechnica: Better than shade: Rooftop material sheds heat into space ars.to/1ts8WcB by [me]

New Snowden docs: GCHQ’s ties to telco gave spies global surveillance reach

arstechnica.com — Documents reportedly from the Edward Snowden cache show that in 2009, GCHQ (and by association, the NSA) had access to the traffic on 63 submarine cable links around the globe. The cables listed handle the vast majority of international Internet traffic as well as private network connections between telecommunications providers and corporate data centers.
Nov 26, 2014

RT @fabiochiusi: New Snowden docs: GCHQ’s ties to telco gave spies global surveillance reach ars.to/15olzkX

Nov 25, 2014

RT @arstechnica: New Snowden docs: GCHQ’s ties to telco gave spies global surveillance reach ars.to/15olzkX by @thepacketrat

Nov 25, 2014

RT @arstechnica: New Snowden docs: GCHQ’s ties to telco gave spies global surveillance reach ars.to/15olzkX by @thepacketrat

Nov 25, 2014

New Snowden docs: GCHQ’s ties to telco gave spies global surveillance reach ars.to/15olzkX I'm guessing this is NSFW for feds.

November’s “Stupid Patent of the Month,” brought to you by Penn State

arstechnica.com — Three months ago, the Electronic Frontier Foundation inaugurated a monthly tradition in which they wrote about a "Stupid Patent of the Month." The first patent they publicized was basically a description of a doctor's "computer-secretary."
Nov 25, 2014

“Stupid Patent of the Month” brought to you by Penn State ars.to/1uype3V It describes ways people work together to solve a problem.

Nov 25, 2014

Feel proud @PennState alums? Your school won @eff's "stupid patent of the month" and now wants to sell it to a troll arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20…

Nov 25, 2014

"The patent reads like what might result if you ate a dictionary filled with buzzwords & drank a bottle of tequila," ars.to/1uype3V

T-Mobile accuses AT&T of lying about data roaming rates

arstechnica.com — T-Mobile US and AT&T have been trading shots over the prices AT&T charges for data roaming as part of the government's investigation into a complaint filed by T-Mobile. As we've previously reported, T-Mobile accused AT&T and Verizon Wireless of charging unreasonably high data roaming rates, making it difficult for smaller carriers to offer better deals to consumers.
Nov 25, 2014

RT @arstechnica: T-Mobile accuses AT&T of lying about data roaming rates ars.to/1vcHkML by @JBrodkin

Nov 25, 2014

found a great picture of Rich Uncle Pennybags for this story about AT&T’s data roaming rates arstechnica.com/business/2014/… pic.twitter.com/MjusdTJShY

Home Depot hit with “at least 44 civil lawsuits” due to data breach

arstechnica.com — Home Depot announced that it is facing "at least 44 civil lawsuits" in the United States and Canada stemming from 56 million customers' data being stolen and exposed earlier this year. Old antivirus, infrequent scans, and a security architect who pled guilty to sabotage.
Nov 25, 2014

RT @wbm312: Home Depot hit with “at least 44 civil lawsuits” due to data breach arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20…

Nov 25, 2014

RT @arstechnica: Home Depot hit with “at least 44 civil lawsuits” due to data breach ars.to/1uCjAOi by @cfarivar

Latest Windows 10 update shows how rapid releases work in practice

arstechnica.com — Windows 10's updates and maintenance are following a different, better path to all prior Windows releases: one with more regular updates and quicker access to new features for those who want it, while still offering enterprises a slower pace of delivery.
Nov 25, 2014

Latest Windows 10 update shows how rapid releases work in practice ift.tt/1zse5pT

Twitter’s plan to acquire a Bieber startup leaked by accidental tweet

arstechnica.com — Generally, Vine thinks online porn is OK, "we just prefer not to be the source of it." In terms of accidentally sent e-mails and Internet postings-the kinds that people wish they'd never clicked "send" on-we think this week's goof by Twitter CFO Anthony Noto takes the cake.
Nov 25, 2014

Twitter’s plan to acquire a Bieber startup leaked by accidental tweet ars.to/1tsaVxQ

Western Union doesn’t like Bitcoin spoof ad, files DMCA takedown claim

arstechnica.com — Facebook has taken down a parody of a Western Union ad posted on a Bitcoin news Facebook page, which was immediately re-published on reddit. Randy Queen takes issue with Tumblr posts using images from his Darkchylde series. On Monday, the money transfer company filed a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) claim with Facebook, alleging trademark infringement of its image.
Nov 25, 2014

RT @arstechnica: Western Union doesn’t like Bitcoin spoof ad, files DMCA takedown claim ars.to/1ts7Ygv by @cfarivar

Judge who unsealed phone snooping orders not a privacy-minded activist

arstechnica.com — A Charlotte, North Carolina, judge has single-handedly sparked the release of surveillance applications involving the use of secretive cell-site simulators known as stingrays. To date, it's the most substantial set of stingray applications-specifically " trap and trace device" orders, a cousin of the "pen register"-to become available.

Verizon promises not to sue over net neutrality-if FCC avoids utility rules

arstechnica.com — Verizon warns government that utility-style rules will lead to lawsuits. Verizon is trying to convince the Federal Communications Commission that it won't sue to block net neutrality rules as long as they're issued without reclassifying broadband providers as utilities. Yet, Verizon Tom Wheeler hasn't talked to Obama since president called for utility rules.
Nov 25, 2014

Verizon promises not to sue FCC over net neutrality—if gets what it wants. Isn't that Putin's strategy in Ukraine? ars.to/11UjMSg

T-Mobile forced to stop hiding slow speeds from throttled customers

arstechnica.com — When T-Mobile US customers exceed their monthly data caps, they aren't cut off from the Internet entirely. Instead, T-Mobile throttles their connections to 128Kbps or 64Kbps, depending on which plan they have, for the rest of the month. Secrecy on throttling fuels complaints against AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, Verizon.
Nov 25, 2014

Few interesting angles here: FCC enforcement, that T-Mobile was running unthrottled speeds through third-party tests… bit.ly/1yTXmvs