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Most Talked About Ars Technica Stories

Report: Amidst layoffs, Nike to kill production of FuelBand

arstechnica.com — According to a Friday report by CNET, Nike is preparing to pull the plug on its FuelBand product, firing the majority of its hardware team (as many as 55 people) this past week. The company appears to be refocusing its efforts on apps, rather than physical hardware-it seems only a matter of time before such sensors are fully incorporated into future models of smartphones.

Record industry rolls on with lawsuits: first Kim Dotcom, now Pandora

arstechnica.com — Five major record labels have sued Pandora over failing to pay royalties for music recorded before 1972. The same record labels also sued SiriusXM satellite radio in September 2013 over similar issues. Due to a quirk in federal law, music recorded before 1972 is not protected under US copyright.
RT @arstechnica: Record industry rolls on with lawsuits: first Kim Dotcom, now Pandora ars.to/1f7ZIMK by @cfarivar

FCC chairman regrets that AT&T and Verizon control the best spectrum

arstechnica.com — FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler today provided an update on next year's auction of broadcast TV spectrum to wireless carriers and said that having two national carriers control the best spectrum is harmful to competition. "Spectrum below 1 GHz-such as the Incentive Auction spectrum-has physical properties that increase the reach of mobile networks over long distances," Wheeler wrote in a blog post.
RT @arstechnica: FCC chairman regrets that AT&T and Verizon control the best spectrum ars.to/1jR5lDf by @JBrodkin
RT @arstechnica: FCC chairman regrets that AT&T and Verizon control the best spectrum ars.to/1jR5lDf by @JBrodkin

Twitter parody account holder sought in police raid

arstechnica.com — Illinois police seized computers and mobile phones while raiding a house whose owner was suspected of parodying the town mayor on Twitter. In all, five people following the Tuesday evening raid were taken to the Peoria Police Department station for questioning, local media report.
"Authorities say Twitter impersonation carries maximum year jail term, $2,500 fine." Where? In Illinois. bit.ly/1mkarJe
"Authorities say Twitter impersonation carries maximum year jail term, $2,500 fine" bit.ly/1ntLyef
"Authorities say Twitter impersonation carries maximum year jail term, $2,500 fine" bit.ly/QjKkXL

AMD loses just $20 million in first quarter 2014

arstechnica.com — In the first quarter of 2014, struggling chip company AMD reported a loss of $20 million on revenue of $1.40 billion. Compared to the same quarter a year ago, this is a 28 percent increase in revenue, and an 87 percent reduction in losses.

Digital Public Library of America to add millions of records to its archive

arstechnica.com — Today marks the Digital Public Library of America's one-year anniversary. To celebrate the occasion, the non-profit library network announced six new partnerships with major archives, including the US Government Printing Office and the J. Paul Getty Trust. The DPLA is best described as a platform that connects the online archives of many libraries around the nation into a single network.

Hands-on with Ubuntu Touch 14.04: Coming along, but miles to go

arstechnica.com — The last time we installed Ubuntu Touch on anything was about a year ago, shortly after the release of Ubuntu 13.04. That version of the phone and tablet operating system was more a proof-of-concept than a true beta-while it showed off the interface and the general-look-and-feel, most of the icons were placeholders and there wasn't a whole lot you could actually do.
Sadly it appears Ubuntu for phones and tablets is still far from done. No e-mail client? arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/0…

Release the robo-kraken: DARPA seeks bottom-dwelling ocean attack bots

arstechnica.com — When trouble's brewing at sea and there's no nearby friendly airbase or port, it could take weeks for US Navy ships and aircraft to show up to protect shipping and keep the enemy at bay.
DARPA's new robots stage on ocean floor, ready 2 release flying & floating drones to the surface. via @thepacketrat arstechnica.com/information-te…
Release the robo-kraken: DARPA seeks bottom-dwelling ocean attack bots ars.to/1l96mKV