Most talked about Ars Technica stories

The Call of Cthubuntu

arstechnica.com — In the dark, abysmal depths, there dwell timeless alien horrors that once roamed the void of space in the ages before the earliest building blocks of life congealed within the primordial waters of our doomed planet.
Oct 31, 2014

RT @segphault: From the @arstechnica archives, here’s my 2008 halloween Lovecraft parody, The Call of Cthubuntu: arstechnica.com/uncategorized/…

Oct 31, 2014

RT @segphault: From the @arstechnica archives, here’s my 2008 halloween Lovecraft parody, The Call of Cthubuntu: arstechnica.com/uncategorized/…

One feared dead as Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo destroyed in test flight

arstechnica.com — Multiple sources are reporting the early termination of this morning's test flight of Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo, which suffered "an in-flight anomaly" at 16:09 UTC. The flight marked the first use of a new fuel to power the ship's engine. Virgin Galactic is expected to release an official statement shortly.

Cop charged with stealing nude pics from women’s phones

arstechnica.com — Prosecutors in Contra Costa County, directly across the bay from San Francisco, have filed criminal felony charges against a California Highway Patrol (CHP) officer, Robert Harrington, who is accused of seizing and distributing racy photos copied from arrestees' phones. Court allows warrantless searches in "exigent" cases like abductions, bomb plots.

A first look at the Microsoft Band

arstechnica.com — While there were a variety of rumors that Microsoft would soon ship a wearable device of some kind, the actual announcement and release-with mere hours between them-was a bit of a surprise. It was so uncharacterstically un-Microsoft.

“The Devil had possessed his netbook”-and other tales of IT terror

arstechnica.com — Earlier this week, we asked readers to share their most frightening tales of technology terror and support horror. And both via comments and Twitter (using the hashtag #ITTalesofTerror), in poured stories that raised goosebumps from those of us who have worked in IT at one point or another.
Oct 31, 2014

“The Devil had possessed his netbook”—and other tales of IT terror ars.to/1wkYQjq. More Halloween tech stories from our readers

Virginia judge: Police can demand a suspect unlock a phone with a fingerprint

arstechnica.com — A Virginia Circuit Court judge ruled on Thursday that a person does not need to provide a passcode to unlock their phone for the police. The court also ruled that demanding a suspect to provide a fingerprint to unlock a phone would be constitutional.
Oct 31, 2014

iPhone 5S, 6, and 6 Plus owners: maybe disable TouchID phone unlocking and use a pass code instead @arstechnica ars.to/1wl8qmg

Oct 31, 2014

RT @arstechnica: Virginia judge: Police can demand a suspect unlock a phone with a fingerprint ars.to/1wl8qmg by @MeganGeuss

Drupal sites had “hours” to patch before attacks started

arstechnica.com — Nearly a million websites running the popular Drupal content management system had only hours to update their software before attacks likely compromised the systems, thanks to a widespread vulnerability, the Drupal security team warned this week.
Oct 31, 2014

If you run Drupal, you're probably compromised. || Drupal sites had “hours” to patch before attacks started feeds.arstechnica.com/~r/arstechnica…

FCC reportedly close to reclassifying ISPs as common carriers

arstechnica.com — Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler is reportedly close to proposing a "hybrid approach" to network neutrality in which Internet service providers would be partially reclassified as common carriers, letting the commission take a harder stance against Internet fast lane deals. However, the proposal would not completely outlaw deals in which Web services pay for faster access to consumers.
Oct 31, 2014

RT @D_Love: sherv.net/cm/emo/funny/2… RT @arstechnica: FCC reportedly close to reclassifying ISPs as common carriers ars.to/1p9f4LN by @JBrodkin

Oct 31, 2014

RT @arstechnica: FCC reportedly close to reclassifying ISPs as common carriers ars.to/1p9f4LN by @JBrodkin

Oct 31, 2014

RT @arstechnica: FCC reportedly close to reclassifying ISPs as common carriers ars.to/1p9f4LN by @JBrodkin

Facebook offers hidden service to Tor users

arstechnica.com — Hidden services running on the Tor network got major support on Friday when Facebook began offering Tor users a way to connect to its services and not run afoul of the social network's algorithms for detecting fraudulent usage of accounts.

Consumer Windows 7 preinstalls come to an end today

arstechnica.com — If you want to buy a PC with Windows 7 Home Basic, Home Premium, or Ultimate preinstalled, you'd better buy it today. As noted earlier this year, October 31 is Microsoft's cut-off date for OEM preinstalls of the consumer editions of Windows 7.
Oct 31, 2014

Consumer Windows 7 preinstalls come to an end today ift.tt/1u1iRMd

After massive Danish hack, Gottfrid Svartholm Warg sentenced to 3.5 years

arstechnica.com — After being convicted of "hacking and gross damage," Gottfrid Svartholm Warg, better known by his nom de hacker "anakata," was sentenced (Google Translate) to 3.5 years in prison by a Danish court on Friday. Gottfrid Svartholm Warg, aka "anakata," could face up to 6 years in prison.
Oct 31, 2014

RT @arstechnica: After massive Danish hack, Gottfrid Svartholm Warg sentenced to 3.5 years ars.to/1wNSARg by @cfarivar

Updated numbers show PS4 with at least 65 percent of two-console market

arstechnica.com — Ars data-crunching shows Sony with about 60 percent of the two-console market. Last week, we waded into the somewhat murky world of console sales number reporting. Our estimate was that Sony had at least 59 percent of the market share in the battle between the PS4 and Xbox One.
Oct 31, 2014

From April to September, the PS4 was a whopping 63 to 68 percent of the three-console market: arstechnica.com/gaming/2014/10…

Oct 31, 2014

Including the Wii U, nearly 50 percent of "current generation" consoles shipped so far have been PlayStation 4's. arstechnica.com/gaming/2014/10…

Oct 31, 2014

The PlayStation 4 has been KILLING its console competition in the last 6 months: arstechnica.com/gaming/2014/10…

A first look at the Microsoft Band

arstechnica.com — While there were a variety of rumors that Microsoft would soon ship a wearable device of some kind, the actual announcement and release-with mere hours between them-was a bit of a surprise. It was so uncharacterstically un-Microsoft.

A trip to Turn 10, the Forza studio merging car culture with games

arstechnica.com — REDMOND, WA-In a relatively anonymous office park about 30 minutes from downtown Seattle, one headquarters clearly stands out from its neighbors. There are unavoidable glimpses of automobile ephemera-Mazerati, Lotus, and Mercedes flags, particularly-hanging in the windows, and the parking lot contains a significantly higher concentration of interesting cars than one would expect.

No one knows who’s been flying drones over French nuclear power plants

arstechnica.com — The French Interior Minister told French public radio (Google Translate) on Thursday that the government has begun an investigation into who has been flying drones above as many as 10 nuclear power plants nationwide this month.
Oct 30, 2014

RT @arstechnica: No one knows who’s been flying drones over French nuclear power plants ars.to/1zOdqDH by @cfarivar

Oct 30, 2014

RT @arstechnica: No one knows who’s been flying drones over French nuclear power plants ars.to/1zOdqDH by @cfarivar

Scare your neighbors with a spooky Halloween network name

arstechnica.com — Earlier today, Ars IT editor Sean Gallagher was doing some scary things with wireless when he discovered someone probing for a Wi-Fi network with a name that appeared to be something un-parsable. I theorized that it was actually something in Unicode that Wireshark wasn't parsing properly. "So someone has a Unicode SSID?"
Oct 30, 2014

Scare your neighbors with a spooky Halloween network name ars.to/1E2cp9N (I set one of mine to Ⓤ_Ⓡ_Ⓗⓐⓒⓚⓔⓓ)

Google ordered to pay a woman $2,250 for Street View image showing cleavage

arstechnica.com — Earlier this month, a Quebecois court in Montreal decided that Google owed a woman $2,250 for picturing her with "part of her breast exposed" in a Street View image. The woman was sitting in front of her house, and although her face was blurred out, she was still identifiable by her coworkers, especially as her car was parked in the driveway without the license plate blurred out.
Oct 31, 2014

Google ordered to pay a woman $2,250 for Street View image showing cleavage - arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20…

Pirate Bay co-founder convicted in Denmark’s “largest hacking case” ever

arstechnica.com — Danish IT expert calls it "largest hacking case ever seen in Scandinavia." One of the co-founders of the notorious Pirate Bay website was convicted (Google Translate) Thursday in a major hacking case in Denmark, and could face up to six years in prison.
Oct 30, 2014

RT @arstechnica: Pirate Bay co-founder convicted in Denmark’s “largest hacking case” ever ars.to/1tlSXBB by @cfarivar

Retailers accuse credit unions of talking smack about card breaches

arstechnica.com — Reeling from the bad press associated with an ongoing parade of data breaches caused by criminal infiltration of their payment systems, representatives of six retail industry associations signed a joint open letter that pushes back against a vocal critic of retailers' cyber-security practices-credit union associations.
Oct 31, 2014

Is 40% of 2.69 per breached card really a fair share of fraud bill for retailers who lose data to pay? They think so. ars.to/1uabJOf

Oct 31, 2014

Retail execs are all bent out of shape about credit union assoc's calling them "negligent entities" in cybersecurity ars.to/1uabJOf

Oct 30, 2014

Retailers accuse credit unions of talking smack about card breaches ars.to/1uabJOf