Most talked about Ars Technica stories

Hollywood v. Goliath: Inside the aggressive studio effort to bring Google to heel

arstechnica.com — Tensions between Google and Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood exploded into public view this week, as Google filed court papers seeking to halt a broad subpoena Hood sent to it. The Hood subpoena, delivered in late October, didn't come out of nowhere.
Dec 20, 2014

Most details yet. || Hollywood v. Goliath: Inside the aggressive studio effort to bring Google to heel arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20…

Dec 20, 2014

RT @MattRosoff: I'm not some Google fanboy, but their response here to the MPAA is 100% justified and appropriate arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20…

Dec 20, 2014

I'm not some Google fanboy, but their response here to the MPAA is 100% justified and appropriate arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20…

Dec 20, 2014

Amazing work. @flohmann: If you read just one article on MPAA's Project Goliath, it should be this one. @joemullin arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20…

Dec 20, 2014

Everybody's picking on Google and blaming them for everything. It's ridiculous. arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20…

Show 7 more tweets from Alex Wilhelm, Joe Mullin and others...

Computer intrusion inflicts massive damage on German steel factory

arstechnica.com — A German steel factory suffered significant damage after attackers gained unauthorized access to computerized systems that help control its blast furnace, according to a report published Friday by IDG News. The attackers took control of the factory's production network through a spear phishing campaign, IDG said, citing a report published Wednesday by the German government's Federal Office for Information Security.
Dec 19, 2014

A malware attack caused "massive" damage to a German steel plant arstechnica.com/security/2014/…

Dec 19, 2014

RT @Alea_: Computer intrusion inflicts massive damage on German steel factory arstechnica.com/security/2014/…

Dec 19, 2014

Computer intrusion said to inflict massive damage on German steel factory ars.to/1AOfSpX

Dec 19, 2014

RT @kwestin: Computer intrusion inflicts massive damage on German steel factory dv8.io/1wt8mSl

EFF: Feds can’t get around Fourth Amendment via automated data capture

arstechnica.com — OAKLAND, Calif.-A federal judge spent over four hours on Friday questioning lawyers from the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and from the Department of Justice in an ongoing digital surveillance-related lawsuit that has dragged on for more than six years. Gov't counsel: Forcing us to save Section 702 data would harm national security.
Dec 19, 2014

Hello, Gov't? Can you stop illegally searching? OK. Thx, bai! // Feds avoid 4th Amendment via automated data capture ars.to/1r96Eoa

Dec 19, 2014

RT @arstechnica: EFF: Feds can’t get around Fourth Amendment via automated data capture ars.to/1r96Eoa by @cfarivar

Obama thinks Sony “made a mistake” pulling The Interview after hack

arstechnica.com — At the president's end-of-year speech on Friday afternoon, Barak Obama acknowledged the FBI's report claiming that North Korea was behind the November hack of Sony Pictures Entertainment and confirmed that the US would lay blame on the isolated nation for Sony's hack.
Dec 19, 2014

RT @arstechnica: Obama thinks Sony “made a mistake” pulling The Interview after hack ars.to/1C9W6ZW by @MeganGeuss

Dec 19, 2014

RT @arstechnica: Obama thinks Sony “made a mistake” pulling The Interview after hack ars.to/1C9W6ZW by @MeganGeuss

FBI claims North Korean involvement in Sony Pictures attack

arstechnica.com — The Federal Bureau of Investigations' Washington press office has issued an update on the investigation into the cyberattack on Sony Pictures Entertainment, including the conclusion that North Korea was behind it.
Dec 19, 2014

The details in the FBI statement are not exactly a smoking gun in Kim Jong Un's hand. ars.to/1wu2OH4

Dec 19, 2014

FBI claims North Korean involvement in Sony Pictures attack ars.to/1wu2OH4

Attack code exploiting critical bugs in net time sync puts servers at risk

arstechnica.com — Several critical vulnerabilities in the protocol used to synchronize clock settings over the Internet are putting countless servers at risk of remote hijacks until they install a security patch, an advisory issued by the federal government warned.
Dec 19, 2014

Attack code exploiting critical bugs in net time sync puts servers at risk ars.to/13mpq0a

Malware believed to hit Sony studio contained a cocktail of badness

arstechnica.com — The highly destructive malware believed to have hit the networks of Sony Pictures Entertainment contained a cocktail of malicious components designed to wreak havoc on infected networks, according to new technical details released by federal officials who work with private-sector security professionals.
Dec 19, 2014

Malware believed to hit Sony studio contained a cocktail of badness ars.to/1CakGd8

After Silk Road takedowns, Dark Web drug sites still thriving

arstechnica.com — New Dread Pirate Roberts tells fans that site will open for business on November 9. Over a year after the shuttering of the original Silk Road website and over a month after the seizure of Silk Road 2 and other similar sites, the sketchiest of Dark Web sites still persist.

Open Bay lets you run your own copy of The Pirate Bay-emphasis on "copy"

arstechnica.com — Legendary file-sharing site The Pirate Bay may have finally been forced offline, but that doesn't mean that the less-than-legal file-sharing scene has slowed down-the shady BitTorrent hydra has many more heads to take The Pirate Bay's place.
Dec 19, 2014

Setting up and poking at Open Bay, a sort-of DIY Pirate Bay static copy that you can host yourself ars.to/1Ca5zQY

12 million home and business routers vulnerable to critical hijacking hack

arstechnica.com — More than 12 million routers in homes and small offices are vulnerable to attacks that allow hackers anywhere in the world to monitor user traffic and take administrative control over the devices, researchers said. The vulnerability resides in "RomPager" software, embedded into the residential gateway devices, made by a company known as AllegroSoft.
Dec 19, 2014

12 million home and business routers vulnerable to critical hijacking hack ars.to/13hJ0ep

Dec 18, 2014

12 million home and business routers vulnerable to critical hijacking hack ars.to/13hJ0ep

Hackers tell Sony “The Interview may release now”-with edits

arstechnica.com — In a message sent to company executives, the hacker group calling itself the Guardians of Peace has given Sony Pictures Entertainment the go-ahead to release the film The Interview- with some minor caveats. First of all, they want any death scene for Kim Jong-un dropped from the film. "This is GOP.

Republicans may have plan to save Internet providers from utility rules

arstechnica.com — Congressional Republicans are drafting an "industry-backed proposal" to enforce net neutrality rules while preventing the Federal Communications Commission from reclassifying Internet service as a utility, The Washington Post reported today. The Republicans "appear likely to introduce legislation next month," the report said. A cable lobby lawyer reveals the industry's darkest fears.
Dec 19, 2014

Conventional wisdom was net neutrality laws won't happen, so Title II next-best thing. This is crazy if true - arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20…

T-Mobile gives up fight over cramming fees, will pay $90M back to customers

arstechnica.com — T-Mobile US has given up its fight against a lawsuit filed by the US government, agreeing today to refund $90 million or more to customers who were charged premium text message fees without their consent.
Dec 19, 2014

RT @ArsLaw: T-Mobile gives up fight over cramming fees, will pay $90M back to customers ars.to/16zz9lY by @JBrodkin

Google moves to halt investigation by Mississippi AG, cites MPAA lobbying

arstechnica.com — Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood has been a persistent critic of Google, complaining that the company's search engine leads consumers quickly to everything from pirated movies to illegal pharmaceuticals. In late October, Hood sent a broad subpoena to Google, which was recently published by The New York Times.
Dec 19, 2014

ars.to/1JjHOIk Nice to see the top LEO of the nation's poorest state so concerned with regulating the Internet @joemullin

BMW i3 review: A city car for the future

arstechnica.com — Specs at a glance: 2014 BMW i3 (Range Extender) Layout Rear engine, rear wheel drive Powerplant AC synchronous electric motor, 2 cylinder inline internal combustion engine Transmission Single speed reduction gear Horsepower 170 bhp @ 4800 rpm Torque 184 lb-ft @ 0 - 11400 rpm Steering rack & pinion (electronic)
Dec 19, 2014

RT @DaveThackeray: The BMW i3 is where electric cars get really interesting. By @arstechnica: bit.ly/13Immwm

Critical Git bug allows malicious code execution on client machines

arstechnica.com — Developers who use the official Git client and related software are being urged to install a security update that kills a bug that could allow attackers to hijack end-user computers. The critical vulnerability affects all Windows- and Mac-based versions of the official Git client and related software that interacts with Git repositories, according to an advisory published Thursday.

Top patent court shoots down Myriad gene testing patents

arstechnica.com — The US Patent and Trademark Office handed out patents on human genes for about 30 years, but genomic patents were blocked after a landmark Supreme Court ruling last year. The patent holder in that case, Myriad Genetics, had patented a test on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

Skype Translator is the most futuristic thing I’ve ever used

arstechnica.com — We have become blasé about technology. The modern smartphone, for example, is in so many ways a remarkable feat of engineering: computing power that not so long ago would have cost millions of dollars and filled entire rooms is now available to fit in your hand for a few hundred bucks.
Dec 18, 2014

If you don’t speak English at all and can read this tweet, please test out Skype Translator with me now. arstechnica.com/information-te…

Dec 18, 2014

RT @DrPizza: Skype Translator is that rarest of products: something that (temporarily, at least) overpowers my tech cynicism. arstechnica.com/information-te…

Dec 18, 2014

RT @DrPizza: Skype Translator is that rarest of products: something that (temporarily, at least) overpowers my tech cynicism. arstechnica.com/information-te…

Dec 18, 2014

Skype Translator is that rarest of products: something that (temporarily, at least) overpowers my tech cynicism. arstechnica.com/information-te…

Dec 18, 2014

Skype Translator is the most futuristic thing I’ve ever used ift.tt/13h8JTY

Show 1 more tweet from Devindra Hardawar

Microsoft sues tech support scammers for trademark violation, false advertising

arstechnica.com — In the latest fight back against tech support scammers, Microsoft has sued firms in California and Florida complaining of trademark infringement, unfair competition, trademark dilution, cybersquatting, and deceptive trading practices. This comes after similar FTC action against scammers in Florida. In its complaint, Microsoft notes that tech support scamming is a big money-maker.
Dec 18, 2014

Microsoft sues tech support scammers for trademark violation, false advertising ift.tt/1zDyISv