Most talked about The Atlantic stories

An Optimist’s Guide to Political Correctness

theatlantic.com — One of the first widespread uses of the telegraph, when it emerged in and then transformed the 19th century, was mundane: the sharing of local weather information. Corn speculators in England began sending terse messages to each other, things like Derby, very dull; York, fine; Leeds, fine; Nottingham, no rain but dull and cold.
Jan 28, 2015

Megan Garber's assessment of online tension is the most worthwhile I've read. j.mp/1uDfl6B

Jan 28, 2015

That's where the @megangarber piece trumps Chait: it captures what's new different about the present moment theatln.tc/1zD10id

Jan 28, 2015

.@megangarber gets her arms around the political correctness phenomenon in a way Chait does not theatln.tc/1zD10id

Jan 28, 2015

This is such a great piece by @megangarber "An Optimist’s Guide to Political Correctness" theatlantic.com/technology/arc…

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Sex, Lies, and Frank Langella:

theatlantic.com — Every week for the third season of FX's spy thriller The Americans, David Sims, Christopher Orr, and Olga Khazan will discuss the intrigue and domestic tiffs playing out behind closed doors in the Jennings household. Sims: As season three of The Americans opens, a creeping rot seems to be finally setting it at the heart of the Soviet Union.

Rural America's Silent Housing Crisis

theatlantic.com — Conversationsabout affordable housing are often dominated with the question of how to get lower-income residents in expensive cities-like New York, Los Angeles, or San Francisco (and their surrounding areas) safe, affordable places to live.
Jan 28, 2015

Big issue in the West. @CityLab explores rural America's often overlooked affordable housing crisis: ow.ly/I6qNq

Jan 28, 2015

RT @Ariana_Tobin: Rural America also has an affordable housing crisis, and we don't talk about it enough. Really good article: m.theatlantic.com/business/archi…

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Introducing the Supertweet

theatlantic.com — If you use Twitter, you've probably encountered the "subtweet," a technique we defined last year in The Atlantic as "the practice of talking about someone without referencing them explicitly." Alexis Madrigal exemplified subtweeting like this: So, "@alexismadrigal is a jerk" is one thing, but "Alexis Madrigal is a jerk" is a subtweet.
Jan 28, 2015

Introducing the Supertweet: This is what realpolitik looks like on the Internet. theatlantic.com/technology/arc… @ibogost

Jan 28, 2015

L'explication de supertweet: a dazzling exegesis of Twitter tropes by @ibogost theatln.tc/1zXUJwU

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www.AndrewSullivan.com - Daily Dish

sullivanarchives.theatlantic.com — IT'S OUR FIFTH ANNIVERSARY! CLICK Monday, February 28, 2005 QUOTE OF THE DAY: "If we're exporting detainees for the express purpose that they be tortured under interrogation by another regime, it's a terrible idea. Any short-term gain that might come out of it won't be worth the long-term ill impression created by it.
Jan 28, 2015

RT @GlynnMacN: Andrew Sullivan did this once before, almost exactly 10 yrs ago actually, in a very similar post sullivanarchives.theatlantic.com/index.php.dish…

Jan 28, 2015

RT @GlynnMacN: Andrew Sullivan did this once before, almost exactly 10 yrs ago actually, in a very similar post sullivanarchives.theatlantic.com/index.php.dish…

Jan 28, 2015

RT @DylanByers: >>>> RT @GlynnMacN: Andrew Sullivan did this once before, almost exactly 10 yrs ago actually, in a very similar post http:/…

Jan 28, 2015

>>>> RT @GlynnMacN: Andrew Sullivan did this once before, almost exactly 10 yrs ago actually, in a very similar post sullivanarchives.theatlantic.com/index.php.dish…

Jan 28, 2015

Andrew Sullivan did this once before, almost exactly 10 yrs ago actually, in a very similar post sullivanarchives.theatlantic.com/index.php.dish…

Officers Ask Google to Remove Cop-Tracking From Waze Traffic App

theatlantic.com — On the streets of Los Angeles, where everyone is looking for a route that skirts traffic, Waze is our jam. The Google-owned mobile phone app draws on everyone in its network of users to determine what roads are moving at what pace, information that allows it to offer optimized, often unexpected directions when crossing town at rush hour.
Jan 28, 2015

Than you @conor64 for this little bit of rationality in an otherwise obscenely irrational week. theatlantic.com/technology/arc…

Jan 28, 2015

Policing is dangerous work. That doesn’t mean cops should be invisible to the public. theatlantic.com/technology/arc…

Jan 28, 2015

. @conor64 runs through all the better ways than Waze for a person hell-bent on attacking the police to find them. theatlantic.com/technology/arc…

The Netanyahu Disaster

theatlantic.com — Benjamin Netanyahu believes he has just one job, and that is to stop Iran from getting hold of nuclear weapons. He might argue that this description of his mission as Israel's prime minister is too limiting, though such an argument would not be particularly credible.
Jan 28, 2015

RT @Doranimated: Bottom line: Obama is embracing Iran and @jeffreygoldberg is supporting him in that policy | theatlantic.com/international/…

Jan 28, 2015

RT @callysally: "A sitting president cannot be written off by a small, dependent ally, without terrible consequences." -on #Netanyahu theatlantic.com/international/…

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Rethinking One of Psychology's Most Infamous Experiments

theatlantic.com — In 1961, Yale University psychology professor Stanley Milgram placed an advertisement in the New Haven Register. "We will pay you $4 for one hour of your time," it read, asking for "500 New Haven men to help us complete a scientific study of memory and learning." Only part of that was true.
Jan 28, 2015

RT @alicelrobb: researchers are questioning one of psychology's most infamous experiments theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Jan 28, 2015

researchers are questioning one of psychology's most infamous experiments theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Jan 28, 2015

There's a lot of good @TheAtlantic today, but you should make time for this @cariromm piece on Stanley Milgram: theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Jan 28, 2015

RT @cariromm: A little something for everyone: a story with electric shocks, Nazis, and also infighting among psychologists theatlantic.com/health/archive…

France's False Choice

theatlantic.com — The impressive and inspiring show of solidarity at France's unity march on January 11-which brought together millions of people and more than 40 world leaders-was not necessarily a sign of good things to come.
Jan 28, 2015

RT @ksadjadpour: 28% of British Muslims “prefer to live under sharia law." Millions of Iranians would gladly change passports w them. theatlantic.com/international/…

Jan 28, 2015

RT @ksadjadpour: 28% of British Muslims “prefer to live under sharia law." Millions of Iranians would gladly change passports w them. theatlantic.com/international/…

Jan 28, 2015

.@shadihamid: "Condemning the Paris killings and affirming the right to blaspheme are not a package deal" theatln.tc/1tsqfRv

Jan 28, 2015

A wonderful essay by @shadihamid: "Can a French Muslim be both illiberal and a good, productive French citizen?" theatln.tc/1tsqfRv

Jan 28, 2015

RT @shadihamid: My new essay in @TheAtlantic -- "France's False Choice," on Islam, violence and a crisis within liberalism: theatlantic.com/international/…

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Fidel Castro Writes Letter in Granma About Cuban-American Relations

theatlantic.com — But what does Fidel think? Ever since the surprising December announcement that the U.S. and Cuba would inch toward normal diplomatic relationsmura, people on both sides of the Strait of Florida have debated what the father of the revolution thought about the deal-and whether he was still alive to have an opinion about it.
Jan 28, 2015

RT @TheAtlantic: Fidel Castro weighs in on Cuba's "defrost" with the U.S. theatln.tc/1Lhf6ZH http://t.co/OgAPsr1Uj3

Jan 28, 2015

RT @TheAtlantic: Fidel Castro weighs in on Cuba's "defrost" with the U.S. theatln.tc/1Lhf6ZH http://t.co/OgAPsr1Uj3

Jan 28, 2015

RT @TheAtlantic: Fidel Castro weighs in on Cuba's "defrost" with the U.S. theatln.tc/1Lhf6ZH http://t.co/OgAPsr1Uj3

How Insurance Companies Still Discriminate Against the Sick

theatlantic.com — One of the most important things the Affordable Care Act (the Obamacare law) was supposed to do was put an end to a practice called pre-existing condition exclusion. Before the law passed, health insurers could refuse to cover any medical services for a health condition a person already had when they joined that insurance plan, or they could prevent the person from joining the plan entirely.
Jan 28, 2015

There are no more pre-existing conditions, but insurance companies still manage to discriminate against the sick: theatlantic.com/health/archive…

President Obama Scraps Plan to Tax 529 College Savings Accounts

theatlantic.com — The Obama administration surely didn't think it was penalizing its core middle-class constituency when it proposed, earlier this month, to raise taxes on college savings accounts known as 529s. After all, a majority of those accounts are held by people earning more than $150,000 a year, and the administration was proposing the change to pay for expanding a tuition tax credit for families making less than that.

Robin Hood in Reverse

theatlantic.com — Those who earn the least pay the most in nearly every state across America. Or rather, the poorest citizens pay the highest proportion of their incomes to local and state governments-twice as much in fact, as the top one percent.

David Ginola: FIFA's Unlikely Beacon of Change

theatlantic.com — Ask a British person who David Ginola is, and the initial response will probably include something about shampoo. Ginola was a soccer star in the '90s, a celebrated playmaker who came over from Paris to bestow European panache upon Premier League teams like Newcastle United and Tottenham Hotspur, and who won the coveted PFA Player of the Year award in 1999.

The Forgiveness Boost

theatlantic.com — On New Year's Eve in 1995, Frances McNeill, a 78-year-old woman who lived alone in Knoxville, Tennessee, went to bed early. Outside, someone watched the house lights flick off. Figuring its inhabitants were gone for the night, he made his move. McNeill awoke to the sound of the intruder rummaging through her bookshelves and drawers.

On a Stanford Man Who Alleged a Sexual Assault

theatlantic.com — Earlier this month, Stanford University senior Justin Brown published an opinion article in The Stanford Daily claiming that he was sexually assaulted by a female classmate. His account came amid an ongoing debate at Stanford about how best to handle allegations of rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment.
Jan 28, 2015

A Stanford Man’s Story of Being Assaulted by a Female Classmate, and Its Confounding Roll in a Campus Debate theatlantic.com/politics/archi…

Jan 28, 2015

blogging is no life for old men, that’s for sure theatlantic.com/politics/archi… or at least non-twentysomething people

Jan 28, 2015

On a male Stanford student who accused a female classmate of sexually assaulting him, but doesn't want her punished: theatlantic.com/politics/archi…

Jan 28, 2015

On a Stanford Man Who Alleged a Sexual Assault theatlantic.com/politics/archi… He says a classmate is guilty—and that she shouldn't be expelled.

From <em>Annihilation</em> to <em>Acceptance</em>: A Writer’s Surreal Journey

theatlantic.com — March 2012. I'm driving down to Orlando for a conference on the fantastic in the arts. My wife, Ann, is in the passenger seat, reading the manuscript of my new novel, Annihilation. I'm nervous as hell and finding it hard to concentrate on the highway-that boring part of I-75 that serves as a gullet straight down into the artificial guts of Disney World.
Jan 28, 2015

"I’m going to have to write the second and third novels in about 18 months, but that’s no big deal, right?” theatlantic.com/features/archi…

Jan 28, 2015

Love this essay by @jeffvandermeer on his surreal experiences writing the Southern Reach Trilogy. theatlantic.com/features/archi…

Seattle Residents Will Be Publically Shamed, Fined for Not Sorting Compost

theatlantic.com — In a more perfect world, leftover food would find its way to the starving people in far-flung places that many parents scolded children about. Instead, as Roberto Ferdman at The Washington Post notes, "food waste has become a growing problem in cities across the United States-the country throws out more food than plastic, paper, metal, or glass."
Jan 28, 2015

Can't begin to imagine how to Seattle's composting law and public shaming regimen would play out in New York. theatlantic.com/national/archi…

The Fight Against Fraud: Solving a $5 Billion Tax Challenge

theatlantic.com — The vast majority of Americans work hard and do their best to be compliant taxpayers. Yet over $5 billion is lost each year as a result of improper payments and criminal fraud. Industry-generated data can contribute to reducing the burden on taxpayers and, in turn, lowering the number of erroneous returns-but incorporating authenticated data into system-wide practices poses significant challenges.
Jan 28, 2015

RT @Atlantic_LIVE: Join us live or virtually at 8:55 am tomorrow to kickoff tax season in a more informed way at #FightFraud. More: theatlantic.com/live/events/fi…