Most talked about The Atlantic stories

Photos of the Week: 7/19-7/25

theatlantic.com — Installation of the new Congress (2014-2018) at the Capitol in Bogota, Colombia, on July 20, 2014. Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos called it a "Congress of peace" and called on lawmakers to support an agenda for a "post-conflict nation." (Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images) Installation of the new Congress (2014-2018) at the Capitol in Bogota, Colombia, on July 20, 2014.
Jul 27, 2014

A bull in a clothing shop, and other pix from the week that was: theatlantic.com/infocus/2014/0…

Mark Twain Looking Pretty Cool in a Silent Film From 1909

theatlantic.com — In what is apparently the only existing footage of Samuel Clemens, aka Mark Twain, the author and Atlantic contributor goes for a stroll, smoking a cigar in his signature white suit. The clip, courtesy of the Internet Archive, was shot by none other than the inventor and pioneer of American filmmaking, Thomas Edison, on Twain's Connecticut property a year before he died.
Jul 27, 2014

In the category of "cool people hanging out," Thomas Edison shot this video of Mark Twain in 1909. theatlantic.com/video/index/26…

Whiteness Is Still a Proxy for Being American

theatlantic.com — Anyone can make a fool of himself. So it's tempting to dismiss last Thursday's mega-gaffe by Florida Representative Curt Clawson as indicative of nothing more than the fallibility of the human brain. But think about the nature of Clawson's goof.

An Apology to Rand Paul

theatlantic.com — A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away, I was a music critic (a pretty lousy one). Also a big fan of Son Volt. When they came through town, I got to do a profile for the local alt-weekly and interview Jay Farrar, their lead singer, which was probably the highlight of my year.

A Sad, Pointless War

theatlantic.com — If you think the human race is a bunch of idiots now, consider what happened a century ago. A Martian might have gazed down upon Europe in 1914 and seen a peaceful, prosperous continent with a shared culture. Pretty much everyone had enough to eat.

Lisa Frank Is Real

theatlantic.com — If you are a female born in the 1980s, I don't need to tell you what Lisa Frank is. In case you are not, Lisa Frank is a wildly popular brand of craft and school supplies featuring kaleidoscopic drawings of unicorns, stars, hearts, teddy bears, and the like.

The History of Typography, in Stop-Motion Animation

theatlantic.com — Let's face it, fonts and typefaces have officially become a mainstream obsession. In our current design-centric culture, terms like sans-serif, Helvetica, and - heaven forbid - Comic Sans have breached the cultural consciousness. Fortunately, for those of you who still can't tell your Futura from your Papyrus, Yukon-based designer Ben Barrett-Forrest has crafted this charming stop-motion history lesson to help you get up to speed.
Jul 27, 2014

RT @jendeaderick: Had kid + friend mesmerized. RT @TheAtlantic A brief history of typography, as told through stop-motion animation theatln.tc/1AmBN9c

Jul 25, 2014

Love this! And so does my 12 year old: The History of Typography, in Stop-Motion Animation (theatlantic.com/video/index/27… via @theatlantic

Show 2 more tweets from Adam Najberg, Shelley Youngblut

The Growing Market for Getting Paid to Wait in Line

theatlantic.com — Those visiting New York for the first time wouldn't be completely incorrect if they figured that at its core, the city is just one long line. When I spent a summer there a couple years ago, I waited outside Lincoln Center to see some of Christian Marclay's mesmerizing video The Clock.
Jul 27, 2014

A hot sector in today's economy? Getting paid to wait in line, for someone else... theatln.tc/UtWqzn (via @TheAtlantic)

Jul 26, 2014

Considering my track record with waiting on lines in NYC, maybe I should get in on this: theatlantic.com/business/archi… (hat tip: @rubinafillion).

Jul 26, 2014

More New Yorkers are making their living by waiting in long lines for $20 or $25 an hour. theatln.tc/1nGQcY6

The ISIS Crackdown on Women, by Women

theatlantic.com — Reports yesterday that ISIS had mandated female circumcision in the Iraqi city of Mosul quickly went viral and were almost as quickly debunked. The claim that the group now calling itself the Islamic State had issued a fatwa requiring female genital mutilation for all women between the ages of 11 and 46 came from a senior U.N.

What Happened to Dinesh D'Souza?

theatlantic.com — In the 1980s, Dinesh D'Souza received some advice from his editor. "Write for the critics. The success of your book will depend on book reviews," D'Souza recalled Adam Bellow of the Free Press telling him. D'Souza was in no position to argue.