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Most Talked About The Atlantic Stories

CAPTCHAs Are Becoming Security Theater

theatlantic.com — CAPTCHAs are a time-worn way for humans to tell computers that we are human. They are those little boxes filled with distorted text that we've been told humans can decipher, but computers-the bad guys' computers-cannot. So, Watson-be-damned, we enter the letters and gain access to whatever is behind the veil, leaving the bad bots steaming outside the pearly, CAPTCHA'd gates.
RT @alexismadrigal: CAPTCHA's are becoming security theater. theatlantic.com/technology/arc… Google's machines can solve them 99% of the time.
"More human than human" theatlantic.com/technology/arc… Google has an algo that can read CAPTCHAs with more than 99% accuracy
RT @alexismadrigal: CAPTCHA's are becoming security theater. theatlantic.com/technology/arc… Google's machines can solve them 99% of the time.
Show 3 more tweets from Kashmir Hill, Ben Smith, Alexis Madrigal

A New Golden Age for Media?

theatlantic.com — For the first time in a long while, people with money are excited about the news business.
RT @blathnaidhealy: "For most of the news business, for most of its history, just getting by was the norm” theatlantic.com/magazine/archi…
RT @pmarca: Great piece on history & future of the news business by Justin Fox of HBR -- theatlantic.com/magazine/archi…
RT @pmarca: Great piece on history & future of the news business by Justin Fox of HBR -- theatlantic.com/magazine/archi…

What Happened to Skywriting?

theatlantic.com — Skywriting is a rare art now. But less than a century ago, it was considered the future of advertising. The technique was relatively simple. Engine-heated paraffin oil mixed with exhaust to produce fluffy streams of white smoke that pilots loop-de-looped into letters on the sky's canvas.

A Bullseye in the Sky Over Texas

theatlantic.com — When we see patterns in the atmosphere from space, they tend to be in the clouds of powerful storms. These all have roughly the same form: they look like a spiral galaxy with arms spinning out from the core. But meteorologists have detected other organizational principles at work.

How to Stop Wasting Time Comparison Shopping

theatlantic.com — Recently, my husband and I wanted to buy some new sheets. But how to choose? Would they lose their shape over the years? Begin to pill? A friend pointed us to Sweethome's recent sheet review. This was no joke.

John Roberts and the Color of Money

theatlantic.com — My friend and MIT colleague Tom Levenson watched, with some interests, the debate between myself and Jonathan Chait. On a whim, Tom pulled together some more thoughts on campaign finance reform that, I think, help spin this conversation forward. His insights are below.
Wonderfully smart (and justifiably angry) by @tomlevenson: John Roberts and the Color of Money The Atlantic theatlantic.com/politics/archi…
John Roberts and the Color of Money - Applying the history of white supremacy in America to the McCutcheon decision. theatlantic.com/politics/archi…
RT @ericmjohnson: Terrific piece by @TomLevenson on the race and gender implications of SCOTUS equating money with speech: http://t.co/Iw6V…
Terrific piece by @TomLevenson on the race and gender implications of SCOTUS equating money with speech: j.mp/1l8nYCg
Show 1 more tweet from Jamelle Bouie

Recognizing When Kids Benefit From Their Parents' Divorce

theatlantic.com — A growing body of literature now suggests that the earlier we turn back the clock in kids' development, the more profound the impact of their environment. Early childhood is critical-race and class differences in achievement are pretty much evident by the time kids reach kindergarten, for instance.
RT @TheAtlanticHLTH: Recognizing When Kids Benefit From Parents Getting Divorced | bit.ly/1gAI9Wb
RT @TheAtlantic: "Would kids really be better off if their parents stayed together?" theatln.tc/1pa6Thi

This Is What It's Like to Drive on a Glow-in-the-Dark Highway

theatlantic.com — In the Dutch city of Oss, 60 miles southeast of Amsterdam, there's a highway named N329. During the day, N329 is a stretch of road like so many others around the world-paved, painted, studded with signs. At night, however, N329-a 500-meter stretch of it, anyway-transforms. Its markings glow in the dark.
What cd go wrong RT @TheAtlantic This is what it's like to drive on a glow-in-the-dark highway theatln.tc/1ipr0Te pic.twitter.com/3IKVcN2RId
A Glow-in-the-Dark Highway - Energy-trapping paint is bringing a Tron-like aesthetic to the roads of the Netherlands. theatlantic.com/technology/arc…
Tron, IRL! This is what it's like to drive down a glow-in-the-dark highway theatln.tc/1ipr0Te

Does Traditional College Debate Reinforce White Privilege?

theatlantic.com — It used to be that if you went to a college-level debate tournament, the students you'd see would be bookish future lawyers from elite universities, most of them white. In matching navy blazers, they'd recite academic arguments for and against various government policies. It was tame, predictable, and, frankly, boring.
RT @globalnation: RT @vanessa_hua: Does Traditional College Debate Reinforce White Privilege? - Jessica Carew Kraft - The Atlantic http://t…
I loved EVERYTHING in this piece about #CEDA debate & AfAm students by @writingkraft such found memories m.theatlantic.com/education/arch…
This hijacking of debate tourneys is a travesty, and it's doing a disservice to students. Worse, it's being rewarded: theatlantic.com/education/arch…
Fascinating piece blows up whole idea of "race debate": Does Traditional College Debate Reinforce White Privilege? theatlantic.com/education/arch…
Show 3 more tweets from Libby A. Nelson, Matthew Zeitlin, Jamelle Bouie

The Confidence Gap

theatlantic.com — F or years, we women have kept our heads down and played by the rules. We've been certain that with enough hard work, our natural talents would be recognized and rewarded. We've made undeniable progress. In the United States, women now earn more college and graduate degrees than men do.
Great read tho > theatlantic.com/features/archi… MT @Slate New books teach women to be overconfident blowhards- Just like men! slate.me/1j2vZY4
"Evidence shows that women are less self-assured than men—and to succeed, confidence matters as much as competence" theatlantic.com/features/archi…
Show 77 more tweets from Alicia Menendez, Ruchika Tulshyan, Fatima Manji, Erin McCann, Rebecca Traister, Alastair Sharp, Amy Wood, Cecilia Kang, Margaret Ely, Jada Graves and others...

404 Error - The Atlantic

theatlantic.com — The Atlantic brings you the smartest journalism on the Web. Just not right here. Oops. Seems that the page you're looking for has gone missing. Please check the URL, or let us know if we have a bad link on our site. You might also try our sitemap.
Interesting and provocative story about race on the college debate circuit. Take a gander: theatlantic.com/education/arch… via @writingkraft

Why Your Neighbors Will Finance Solar Panels for Your Roof

theatlantic.com — Here's another reason to be nice to the neighbors: They might just give you a no-money-down, low-cost loan to put solar panels on your roof, and once you pay off that debt you'll get essentially free electricity as long as you own your home. Welcome to the latest innovation in renewable energy: The crowdsourced solar loan.
Why Your Neighbors Will Finance Solar Panels for Your Roof. Crowdfunding comes to solar loans. My @TheAtlantic story: theatlantic.com/technology/arc…

A Breathtaking Tour Above the Moab Desert

theatlantic.com — Favorites From Around the Web Apr 16, 2014 | 27-part series Filmmaker Ian Cresswell rigs an HD camera atop a remote-controlled "octocopter" for some spectacular aerial views. To see more of Cresswell's work visit his Vimeo. Courtesy of Ian Cresswell About This Series Outstanding short films selected by Atlantic staff

China's Forgotten Liberal Hero

theatlantic.com — 25 years ago yesterday, a senior Chinese politician named Hu Yaobang complained of dizziness at a meeting in Beijing, and asked to be excused. Moments later, he collapsed with a fatal heart attack. The 74-year-old Hu, one of China's most senior leaders just two years before, was dead.
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