Most talked about The Atlantic stories

The 3-Word Tweet That Cost a Politician Her Job

theatlantic.com — One of the difficulties of navigating countries and cultures that are not your own is decoding the subtext of what you observe-understanding the power of context, and appreciating not just what's said but what's left unsaid.
Nov 22, 2014

RT @jonronson: American magazine patiently (and accurately) decodes for the US the Emily Thornberry saga (thanks @bernardmc) m.theatlantic.com/international/…

Nov 22, 2014

"The English equivalent of Obama's comment in 2008 about people 'clinging to guns and religion'" brilliant via @urilf theatln.tc/1BYrjQD

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Why Is the Smithsonian Standing Behind Bill Cosby?

theatlantic.com — Simmie Knox/David Stansbury/Smithsonian Bill Cosby did not want to talk about rape with the Associated Press. That much he made clear in an interview with AP arts reporter Brett Zongker, who interviewed Cosby and his wife, Camille, upon the opening of an exhibit of their collection of African American art at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art.
Nov 21, 2014

RT @DRUDGE_REPORT: MAG: Why Is the Smithsonian Standing Behind Bill Cosby? drudge.tw/1vxWgbu

Nov 21, 2014

Really interesting read about art and ethics: Why Is the @smithsonian Standing Behind Bill Cosby? theatlantic.com/entertainment/…

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Princess Leia and Sexiest Man Alive: The Week in Pop-Culture Writing

theatlantic.com — Where the Fuck is Princess Leia? Glynnis MacNicol | Medium "Somewhere in the pink ghetto otherwise known as their girls toys section I figured I would find something. I didn't. Not a thing." "The Sexiest Man Alive was born in Rockefeller Center, on the 29 th floor of the Time-Life Building, inside the offices of one of the most popular magazines in America."
Nov 22, 2014

Princess Leia and Sexiest Man Alive: The Week in Pop-Culture Writing theatlantic.com/entertainment/…

Castro: 'Oswald Could Not Have Been the One Who Killed Kennedy'

theatlantic.com — Fidel Castro shares at least one belief with the majority of Americans: He is convinced that the assassination of President John F. Kennedy was not the work of a lone gunman, but was the culmination of a broad conspiracy.

A Time Capsule on the Moon

theatlantic.com — A decade from now, if all goes well, a spacecraft with a high-tech drill will land in the South Pole-Aitken basin of the moon. There, it will bore 66 feet down into the surface and collect samples of the mantle to bring back to Earth.
Nov 22, 2014

RT @shirklesxp: Lunar Mission One will drill into the moon's south pole *and* leave behind a time capsule (maybe w/ your hair inside) theatlantic.com/technology/arc…

America Just Launched Its 500th Drone Strike

theatlantic.com — The most consistent and era-defining tactic of America's post-9/11 counterterrorism strategies has been the targeted killing of suspected terrorists and militants outside of defined battlefields. As one senior Bush administration official explained in October 2001, "The president has given the [CIA] the green light to do whatever is necessary.

Why Do People Write Graffiti on Bathroom Walls?

theatlantic.com — "Well sung of Yore, a Bard of Wit/That some Folks read, but all Folks shit/But now the Case is alter'd quite/Since all who come to Boghouse write." So was written on a boghouse sometime in the early 18th century-a boghouse being a public toilet.
Nov 21, 2014

"If I can stop you from scribbling a book proposal titled Women Draw Hearts, Men Draw Penises for just a moment ..." theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Nov 21, 2014

Why do we scribble on public bathroom walls? @TheAtlantic looks at the history of mid-poo poetry and graffiti: theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Nov 21, 2014

Me on why people write bathroom graffiti—it’s not because men want to be pregnant, but one guy thought so! theatlantic.com/health/archive…

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The Best 71-Second Animation You'll Watch Today

theatlantic.com — http://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/383057/a-tale-of-momentum-inertia/ No good deed goes unpunished in this goofy short produced by HouseSpecial, a Portland-based animation studio. It's on the shorter side-the whole story lasts just longer than a minute-yet it's animated with remarkable specificity and humor. (The rock monster's eyebrows, for example, are just delightful.)

Ted Cruz: Confused About Cicero

theatlantic.com — For better than two millennia, politicians have invoked classical Greek and Roman literature to construct, defend, and challenge ideologies of power. On Thursday, November 20, Senator Ted Cruz channeled his inner Cicero and delivered his own rendition of " In Catilinam (Against Catiline)" to denounce President Obama's planned executive actions on immigration reform.
Nov 21, 2014

A classicist explains the problems with Ted Cruz's Cicero speech in the Senate Thursday theatlantic.com/politics/archi…

Obama Immigration Speech: The President Fulfills His Promise to Progressives

theatlantic.com — In his decision to act, by himself, on immigration, President Obama chose between two sides of his political self. It's hard to remember now, but once upon a time, bipartisanship was near the heart of Obama's political appeal.
Nov 21, 2014

RT @Ollieso: "In his youth, Obama wasn’t an aspiring politician. He was an aspiring activist." theatlantic.com/politics/archi… Great piece by @peterbeinart

Nov 21, 2014

RT @cunyjschool: CUNY prof @PeterBeinart on Obama's #immigration speech: The President Fulfills His Promise to Progressives: buff.ly/1vwkSRV

Nov 21, 2014

And @PeterBeinart has the most robust defense of Obama's action I've seen, although I disagree with the moral frame: theatlantic.com/politics/archi…

Nov 20, 2014

RT @djpressman: Insightful MT @PeterBeinart: as a young man, Obama yearned to help lead a new civil rights movement. Tonight he did. theatlantic.com/politics/archi…

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Service Dogs for Sexual-Assault Survivors

theatlantic.com — After running away from home at 13, Alicia was pulled into a small-time child-prostitution ring and repeatedly abused until she escaped three years later. The experience left scars, but it wasn't until she was sexually assaulted again during her junior year of college that she developed post-traumatic stress disorder, causing her to constantly relive her trauma in nightmares and flashbacks.
Nov 21, 2014

RT @RoniShayne: Rape victims develop PTSD at an even higher rate than veterans. Service dogs could help. My piece for @TheAtlantic theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Nov 21, 2014

RT @RoniShayne: Rape victims develop PTSD at an even higher rate than veterans. Service dogs could help. My piece for @TheAtlantic theatlantic.com/health/archive…

When Private School Tuition Costs More Than College

theatlantic.com — Tuition for a typical private high school in the Southeast costs a relativelymodest $18,900 a year. But move a few hours north and that price tag becomes far more daunting. A private school in New York or New Jersey, for example, costs $34,400.
Nov 21, 2014

RT @TheAtlantic: Private high schools in New England charge more than $35,000 a year on average in tuition theatln.tc/1xWrd71

Nov 21, 2014

RT @TheAtlantic: Private high schools in New England charge more than $35,000 a year on average in tuition theatln.tc/1xWrd71

The Rape Accusations Against Bill Cosby Must Not Be Ignored

theatlantic.com — On Monday, 66-year old Joan Tarshis accused Bill Cosby of raping her. Tarshis says the attack took place in 1969, when she was 19 and working as comedy writer: ...[H]e told me that he wanted to work on a monologue together, and I had an idea for something about an earthquake that had just happened.
Nov 22, 2014

RT @ConnieSchultz: "I don't have many writing regrets. But this is one of them." @tanehisicoates on rape claims against Bill Cosby. theatlantic.com/entertainment/…

Nov 21, 2014

The Rape Accusations Against Bill Cosby Must Not Be Ignored - The Atlantic theatlantic.com/entertainment/…

Nov 21, 2014

RT @SeanWoods12: This is pretty damn great and shows you how a writer can wrestle with a story for years: The Cosby Show theatlantic.com/entertainment/…

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An Incredibly Simple Way to Defuse Political Fights

theatlantic.com — "It's Official," said the headline on a Bloomberg News article from last month, "Partisan Rancor Worst in Over a Century." The good news is that this headline is slightly misleading. According to the rancor index that the story cited-which is based on the frequency of newspaper reports of disagreement among federal politicians-peak rancor was actually reached last year, during the government shutdown.
Nov 21, 2014

“The liberal conceded that the government 'should be mindful of people’s religious exercise...'" theatln.tc/1uKltfe

Nov 21, 2014

“viewing a concession created a more positive reaction to the ideological opponent.” theatln.tc/1xKbqKY

Nov 21, 2014

The science behind why President Obama always grants a rhetorical concession to the other side in his speeches. theatln.tc/11KBHeQ

Africa Nears Eradication of Polio

theatlantic.com — One month after quelling its deadly Ebola outbreak, Nigeria stands poised to make another public health triumph-the near-eradication of polio. Since 2012, when the World Health Organization declared the crippling infectious disease a "global health emergency," the West African country (the last center of polio on the continent) has overhauled its strategies for combating the scourge.

The Case for Napping at Work

theatlantic.com — http://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/382937/sleep-at-work/ Most Americans don't get enough sleep. People are exhausted. Isn't it time for a wake-up call? James Hamblin makes the case for napping at work. About This Series Off-beat perspectives on health topics from Dr. James Hamblin
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Why Baseball Player Giancarlo Stanton's 13-Year, $325 Million Marlins Contract Doesn't Make Him Overpaid

theatlantic.com — On Wednesday, the Miami Marlins held a press conference to formally announce that Giancarlo Stanton, the team's star right fielder, had signed a 13-year, $325-million contract extension. During the proceedings, a reporter asked the 25-year-old Stanton whether he was embarrassed to be earning so much money.
Nov 21, 2014

Arguing that a baseball player deserves MORE than the $325 mil contract he got is the definition of a scalding take theatlantic.com/entertainment/…

After 61 Losses, You'd Celebrate Tying 0-0, Too

theatlantic.com — They're back at their day jobs this week, putting on their hats, trudging through the Apennine rain. Aldo is an accountant. Alessandro works in a ceramics shop. Mirko, that rascal, is actually a professional soccer player. I'm talking about the members of San Marino soccer team, who last Saturday ended a run of 61 consecutive defeats with a 0-0 draw against visiting Estonia.
Nov 21, 2014

Fantastic @Noahgordon10 piece on San Marino's soccer team, which just broke a 61-loss drought with ... a tie. theatlantic.com/entertainment/…

The Economic Case Against Majoring in Fun Things

theatlantic.com — For many, the reality of student debt doesn't hit home until you make your first payment. Though you may have read your paperwork and done the math on how much monthly debt repayment will cost, in practice, paying the piper can come as a shock.
Nov 21, 2014

Good thing I thought majoring in the sciences was fun, I guess. "The Economic Case Against Majoring in Fun Things" theatlantic.com/business/archi…