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Most Talked About Bloomberg Businessweek Stories

John Henry and the Making of a Boston Red Sox Baseball Dynasty

businessweek.com — Successful Team Building Andrew Hetherington for Bloomberg Businessweek It's Opening Day at Fenway Park, more than an hour before game time, and the seats are already jammed. No surprise here. Boston Red Sox fans feed on emotion.
RT @BradWieners: “A sorghum bean can’t pull its hamstring"...How #Redsox won 3 WS in 10 yrs & the method's limits @JoshuaGreen http://t.co…
I'll be on @Morning_Joe at 7, talking new @BW cover: "John Henry and the Making of a Red Sox Dynasty" buswk.co/1mCFpwl

The Dumb Way We Board Airplanes Remains Impervious to Good Data

businessweek.com — If the conference calls that come with earnings reports attracted exhausted travelers instead of financial analysts and journalists, there's no way Delta, United, American, and Southwest could make it through the week without getting an earful about the agonies of boarding an airplane.
Fastest Way to Board Planes: "Outside In." Read, watch, debate buswk.co/QyyedJ via @BW
The dumb way we board airplanes remains impervious to good data buswk.co/QyyedJ via @BW
Boarding planes silly and set to continue that way, ignoring data that could improve the process. mobile.businessweek.com/articles/2014-…
Show 6 more tweets from Ana Marie Cox, Ramesh Ponnuru, Shelley Youngblut, Andrew Grossman, John Tozzi, Joshua Green

We Gave You a Sweet Job Overseas. Then We Brought You Home. Now You’re Quitting?

businessweek.com — Photograph by Steven Taylor/Getty Images, photo illustration by 731 Multinationals invest plenty sending employees abroad and holding their hands to keep them happy during overseas assignments. The companies generally neglect the workers when they bring them back to headquarters, leading about 25 percent to quit their jobs in the first two years after returning.
RT @maryjanenot: Expats have the support of their companies. Coming back is a diff. story. @iesebs Prof.Reiche explains buswk.co/1jSdKEX by @nickleiber
RT @maryjanenot: Expats have the support of their companies. Coming back is a diff. story. @iesebs Prof.Reiche explains buswk.co/1jSdKEX by @nickleiber

Game That Brings Out the Worst In Us Is a Huge Hit

businessweek.com — April 24 (Bloomberg) --Cards Against Humanity is described as a "party game for horrible people." Its development originated from a successful Kickstarter campaign, and has dominated the top spot in Amazon's toys and games category. Here's what happens when a group of Bloomberg employees play one of

Apple Sells More iPhones Than Expected, Fewer iPads

businessweek.com — earnings showed a tale of two mobile devices: The iPhone is doing better than expected, and the iPad is doing worse. Apple was bound to see a drop in iPhone sales form last quarter, when it moved many of its just-released 5S model, but the 43 million iPhones sold last quarter easily beat analysts' forecasts of 37 million.
Call me, maybe? --> Apple Sells More iPhones Than Expected, Fewer iPads buswk.co/1rmzI7T via @BW

An Apparel-Making Revival? This 'Made in USA' Story Doesn't Hold Up

businessweek.com — Photograph by Atisha Paulson/Bloomberg There's been a lot of talk about apparel makers coming back to the U.S. Glenn Beck launched a line of made-in-America clothing in 2012. USA Today reported last year that jobs are "trickling back," citing reshoring by Brooks Brothers, Saks, and dozens of smaller companies as evidence.
RT @petercoy: An apparel-making revival? I report that this 'made in USA’ story doesn't hold up buswk.co/QymGHf via @BW
RT @petercoy: An apparel-making revival? I report that this 'made in USA’ story doesn't hold up buswk.co/QymGHf via @BW
An apparel-making revival? I report that this 'made in USA’ story doesn't hold up buswk.co/QymGHf via @BW

U.K. Resurrecting Loans for 95% of Value Deemed Risky: Mortgages

businessweek.com — Bloomberg News When James Seabury found his first home in northeast England in November, he had to borrow almost all of the 140,500-pound ($236,000) purchase price. "Seven thousand pounds was all we had for a deposit," said Seabury, 30, a town planner whose loan covered 95 percent of the purchase price.

Obama Says U.S. Ready to Move on Additional Russia Sanctions (1)

businessweek.com — Bloomberg News President Barack Obama said the U.S. and its allies have additional sanctions against Russia ready to go as the crisis in Ukraine escalated with Ukrainian security forces moving against pro-Russian separatists.

MTN Says Users Rise 1.1% as Nigeria Counters South Africa Drop

businessweek.com — Bloomberg News MTN Group Ltd. (MTN), Africa's largest wireless operator, said subscriber numbers across its 22 markets rose 1.1 percent in the first quarter after growth in Nigeria countered a decline in customers in South Africa.
Mobile phone growth in #Nigeria starting to ebb? MTN says users rise "marginally" by 1.1% in its biggest market - buswk.co/1f6c8uk

Russia to Refrain From Rate Increase on Ukraine Woes, Poll Shows

businessweek.com — Bloomberg News Russia's central bank will probably refrain from seeking to counter accelerating inflation with higher interests rates as the economy comes under increasing strain in the escalating Ukrainian crisis. Policy makers will leave the benchmark one-week auction rate will at 7 percent at a meeting in Moscow tomorrow, according to 22 of 23 economists in a Bloomberg survey.
Russia to Refrain From Rate Increase on Ukraine Woes, Poll Shows buswk.co/1rmN2ZK via @BW

Salmond Takes Scottish Independence Campaign Over Hadrian’s Wall

businessweek.com — Bloomberg News Scottish nationalist leader Alex Salmond took his campaign for independence across the border, arguing that Scotland can become an economic counterweight to London and benefit less affluent parts of England.
RT @ACBerlin: Salmond Takes Scottish Independence Campaign Over Hadrian’s Wall - Businessweek via @BW buswk.co/1mAZ1ku

Globalization's Peak Year Was 2007

businessweek.com — Global Economics Photograph by Daniel Acker/Bloomberg A broad new measure of globalization puts its peak year to date as 2007. Financial flows went into a steep decline when the global financial crisis hit in 2008 and still haven't recovered, according to the new report by the McKinsey Global Institute.

Ross School of Business Wants A 200-Year-Old Oak to Make Like a Tree and Leave

businessweek.com — Business Schools Photograph by Joel S. Johnson/Michigan Photography Business schools spare little expense to make their campuses sparkle for alumni, recruiters, and prospective students. For the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business, that means spending $300,000 to uproot a 65-foot-tall tree and transplant it across the business school campus.
RT @BWbschools: Cost-per-student at public research universities: $28,325. Cost for @MichiganRoss to move this old tree: $300K: buswk.co/1rm8sGu
RT @JanetLorin: U Michigan's Ross School of Business wants a 200-year-old oak to make like a tree and leave buswk.co/1lFq0OM via @BW
U Michigan's Ross School of Business wants a 200-year-old oak to make like a tree and leave buswk.co/1lFq0OM via @BW

Raytheon Recovering From Missile Delivery Delays, Air Force Says

businessweek.com — Bloomberg News has recovered almost 30 percent of about $621 million withheld by the U.S. Air Force since 2012 because it missed deadlines for delivering missiles. Raytheon, the world's largest missile maker, received $179 million of the performance payments that had been held back as of March 5, Ed Gulick, a spokesman for the Air Force, said in an e-mailed statement.
Raytheon Recovering From Missile Delivery Delays, Air Force Says - Businessweek via @BW buswk.co/1lG9TAp

None

businessweek.com — Bloomberg News Paul Volcker hasn't endeared himself to Wall Street bond dealers. That's just fine with Fidelity Investments. While the U.S. Dodd-Frank Act's Volcker Rule has curtailed the ability of banks to use their own money for trading, the biggest money managers have stepped in, using their growing buying power to absorb at a discount large amounts of bonds that get put up for sale.
RT @LisaAbramowicz1: Where did all those bonds go last summer during the big selloff? Fidelity may have gotten a bunch at a discount. buswk.co/1lDvsSj
RT @sharrington_: Wall Street may hate the Volcker Rule, but big bond manager Fidelity loves it. buswk.co/1mD6n9y @LisaAbramowicz1 @mkmcollins
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