Most talked about Computerworld stories

The Google shakeup continues: Andy Rubin is out

computerworld.com — The corporate shakeup at Google continues and now it's Andy Rubin, the former head of the company's Android business and the current head of its robotics arm, who's out. A Google spokesperson confirmed to Computerworld Thursday night that Rubin is leaving the company, but declined to say how his departure might affect Google's robotics efforts.

FCC's Wheeler mulls hybrid approach to net neutrality

computerworld.com — The U.S. Federal Communications Commission appears set to reclassify broadband so that it comes under the agency's authority, but without explicitly prohibiting special access deals between broadband and content companies, according to a news report.

NASA puts finishing touches on its first Mars-bound spacecraft

computerworld.com — NASA engineers and technicians on Thursday put the finishing touches on Orion, the spacecraft designed to take astronauts into deep space. Thursday's work marked the conclusion of construction on the first spacecraft designed to carry humans past the moon.

Google's RAPPOR aims to preserve privacy while snaring software stats

computerworld.com — Google is applying a surveying technique from the 1960s to a project that aims to collect data about users' computers without compromising their privacy. The project is nicknamed RAPPOR, which stands for Randomized Aggregatable Privacy-Preserving Ordinal Response. Google plans to present a paper on it next week at the ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security.

Andy Rubin says BYE BYE GOOGLE

computerworld.com — Andy Rubin, key driving force behind the wildly successful Android OS, and ex-current lead robotics researcher at Google is leaving the company for greener pastures. Latest in a series of highly publicized departures, Rubin is moving on after a restructuring blitz has placed control of many key projects into the hands of executive Sundar Pichai.

Major banks prep their own mobile payment apps

computerworld.com — Several major national and international banks are planning to launch their own mobile payments apps next year. The banks would be major competitors to handset makers Apple and Google because unlike others pushing mobile wallet technology, such as mobile phone carriers and retailers, they already have an intimate relationship with consumers and know their spending habits.

IT spending reality check: 2014's mixed message

computerworld.com — Tech budgets and hiring are down from earlier optimistic projections, but IT's confidence is holding steady.

Hands on: The first things you notice about Verizon's Droid Turbo

computerworld.com — With the Nexus 9, Nexus 6, and Lollipop all landing in our laps over the next few weeks, you might think we'd be fresh out of room for any more new stuff here in AndroidLand. Well, my friends, you'd be wrong.
Oct 30, 2014

RT @jr_raphael: Hands on: The first things you notice about Verizon's Droid Turbo goo.gl/t8KqOA "Like a Moto X on steroids" pic.twitter.com/urw30mdtZg

Oct 30, 2014

Hands on: The first things you notice about Verizon's Droid Turbo goo.gl/t8KqOA "Like a Moto X on steroids" pic.twitter.com/urw30mdtZg

Zuckerberg looks to connect with regular folk in his first 'community Q&A'

computerworld.com — If you've always wondered if Mark Zuckerberg has a favorite hoodie, or a favorite programming language, now's your chance to find out. Facebook's chief will host his first community Q&A next Thursday at 5 p.m. Eastern, giving the public a chance to ask any questions they might have for him.
Oct 30, 2014

Facebook’s Zuckerberg looks to connect with regular folk in his first 'community Q&A’ @zachminers computerworld.com/article/284187…

Apple surrenders top tablet satisfaction spot to Amazon

computerworld.com — Just five months after Apple took J.D. Power's tablet satisfaction award away from Samsung, it lost it today to up-and-coming Amazon. Apple's iPad finished in second place in the latest satisfaction survey conducted by J.D. Power and Associates, with a score of 824 out of a possible 1,000.
Oct 30, 2014

RT @gkeizer: Apple surrenders top tablet satisfaction spot to Amazon in J.D. Power's survey and scoring. computerworld.com/article/284155…

Vulnerabilities in command-line tools prompt wget and tnftp patches

computerworld.com — The critical Shellshock vulnerabilities found last month in the Bash Unix shell have motivated security researchers to search for similar flaws in old, but widely used, command-line utilities.

One code to rule them all: Dronecode

computerworld.com — Drones have just found their new best friends: coders. On Oct. 13, the Linux Foundation unveiled a nonprofit organization called the Dronecode Project, an open-source development initiative uniting thousands of coders for the purpose of building an aerial operating system for drones.

Sencha's Space melds desktop and smartphone management

computerworld.com — Sencha, best known for its cross-platform development tools, has designs on the management market with Space.

Microsoft releases stopgap POODLE protection for Internet Explorer

computerworld.com — Microsoft on Wednesday gave Windows customers an easier way to block attacks against Internet Explorer (IE) meant to steal browser session cookies and impersonate victims. Two weeks after Google researchers revealed the "POODLE" attack method and about the same length of time before Microsoft releases its next round of security updates, Microsoft offered one of its automated "Fixit" tools to disable SSL 3.0, an aged and vulnerable Internet encryption standard.
Oct 30, 2014

RT @gkeizer: Microsoft releases stopgap POODLE protection for Internet Explorer. computerworld.com/article/284098…

Drupal warns unpatched users: Assume your site was hacked

computerworld.com — Users of Drupal, one of the most popular content management systems, should consider their sites compromised if they didn't immediately apply a security patch released on Oct. 15. The unusually alarming statement was part of a "public service announcement" issued by the Drupal project's security team Wednesday.

What Google really gained from owning Motorola

computerworld.com — Lenovo and Motorola -- who woulda thunk? As we all try to make sense of Google's shocking sale -- and what it might mean for the future of Motorola products -- it's worth considering what exactly Google got out of its 20-month-long Moto ownership.
Oct 30, 2014

What Google really gained from owning Motorola: goo.gl/WC9c4J Written nine months ago today, and more relevant now than ever.

The Charge of the Troll Brigade: What to know about #GamerGate

computerworld.com — There are two ways to think about #GamerGate. The short version is that it's a loosely-organized mob of so-called "gamers" rallied around a Twitter hashtag focused on the harassment of women -- primarily, but not only, female game developers -- under the pretense of pushing for higher standards in video game journalism.

After rocket explosion, no air, water pollutants detected

computerworld.com — The initial assessment of the explosion that destroyed an Antares rocket and cargo craft on launch Tuesday evening showed no signs that the blast emitted pollution into the water or air around the launch area in Virginia.
Oct 30, 2014

#NASA: After rocket explosion, no air, water pollutants detected around #wallopsisland. bit.ly/1rVPVzB #Cygnus

Sorry movie goers, Google Glass, other wearables banned from cinemas

computerworld.com — Going to the movies this weekend? You better leave your pair of Google Glass at home or at least in your bag. The Motion Picture Association of America and the National Association of Theatre Owners announced on Wednesday that wearable devices must be turned off and put away at show time.