Most talked about Discover Magazine stories

Illusion Makes People Speak with the Voice of Their Avatar

blogs.discovermagazine.com — Think you're in control of your own body? A simple virtual-reality session could not only make you feel like an avatar's body is your own, but make you speak more like the digital character.

A Fabulous Menu of Citizen Science for Thanksgiving!

blogs.discovermagazine.com — Dig into this serving of Thanksgiving projects with your friends and family! Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count Help researchers take census of winter Monarch butterflies. Count Monarchs in colonies, during the mornings around Thanksgiving. Get started! Thanksgiving Day Western Bird Count Help monitor winter bird populations in Western states.

Archaeologists Explore the Largest Greek Tomb Ever Found

Discover Magazine: The latest in science and technology news, blogs and articles

discovermagazine.com — Discover's 100 top stories of 2014 is jam-packed with the best in science from the past year. From space exploration to medicine, technology, paleontology and environment, we've got every field covered. Highlights include a spacecraft's rendezvous with a comet, the origins of the first Americans, how to defeat hackers and an inside look at the Ebola outbreak.
Nov 26, 2014

What's science done all year besides lament lack of $? See: @DiscoverMag's tell-all Top100Storiesof2014 (esp. #19&32) bit.ly/1y2kb35

"Imbeciles" on Twitter Continue to Distract Nassim Taleb

blogs.discovermagazine.com — Those of you familiar with Black Swan author Nassim Taleb know he has a formidable mind and an abrasive public persona. It is necessary to separate the two when analyzing his logic, which is what economist/writer Noah Smith does admirably in his Bloomberg column on Taleb's controversial GMO paper.

A Sex Researcher At A Furry Convention

blogs.discovermagazine.com — A report in the journal Archives of Sexual Behaviour describes an unusual field trip made by Canadian researcher Debra W. Soh - to a furry convention, expecting to witness some kind of sexual free-for-all (or free-fur-all).

How Dogs Drink Revealed in Super Slo-Mo Video

blogs.discovermagazine.com — It doesn't take scientific observation to know that dogs aren't the most graceful of drinkers. Blame it on their cheeks: dogs have what are called "incomplete cheeks," which allow them to open their mouths wide but, conversely, means they can't create suction like humans do when drinking through a straw.

A Better Way to Screen Airport Passengers, With Psychology

blogs.discovermagazine.com — This article was originally published on The Conversation. International airports are a busy place to be. Nearly 140,000 passengers pass through New York's JFK Airport every day. The internal security of the country depends on effective airport checks. All departing passengers pass through a series of security procedures before embarking their plane.
Nov 26, 2014

RT @DiscoverMag: The US spends millions for behavior-detection screening at airports. It doesn't work: bit.ly/1HELEed pic.twitter.com/fg1AAAuE6u

Nov 26, 2014

RT @DiscoverMag: The US spends millions for behavior-detection screening at airports. It doesn't work: bit.ly/1HELEed pic.twitter.com/fg1AAAuE6u

Flashback Friday: Does garlic protect against vampires? An experimental study.

blogs.discovermagazine.com — We all know that garlic will supposedly keep vampires at bay. But where does this legend come from, you ask? Who cares!? What we really want-no, NEED- to know is whether or not it actually works! But since actual vampires are in such short supply, how can anyone test this hypothesis?
Nov 25, 2014

RT @DiscoverMag: Does garlic protect against vampires? An experimental study. bit.ly/1r4UWG0

Can Doggie DNA Tests Decode Your Mutt’s Makeup?

blogs.discovermagazine.com — Mixed breed. Mongrel. Roadside setter. A something-something. Dogs of uncertain provenance get called a lot of things. When the animal arrives at a shelter, staff usually can make only an educated guess about the dog's parentage. Most of the dogs at my local animal control are assessed as "pit mixes" upon arrival - including the three I've adopted over the past 2 years.

Getting Rid of Invasive Species With a Little Electric Shock

blogs.discovermagazine.com — The problem of invasive species is a slippery one for fisheries managers. One of the most notorious invaders, Asian carp, now dominates large portions of freshwater in the central U.S., and keeping them out of the Great Lakes could cost upward of $18 billion, according to a recent study by the U.S.
Nov 25, 2014

RT @coreyspowell: "Backpack electrofishing"could be an effective way to push back invasive species. bit.ly/1zoYO95 pic.twitter.com/gOxQIUD4Xj

Failed Replications: A Reality Check for Neuroscience?

blogs.discovermagazine.com — An attempt to replicate the results of some recent neuroscience papers that claimed to find correlations between human brain structure and behavior has drawn a blank. The new paper is by University of Amsterdam researchers Wouter Boekel and colleagues and it's in press now at Cortex.

Termite Queen Clones Herself by Making Eggs Impervious to Sperm

blogs.discovermagazine.com — Even kings and queens that have six legs and live underground aren't immune to royal machinations. In one Asian termite species, queens choose to shut their mates out of the picture when it's time to breed a successor. They simply clone themselves to make new queens.
Nov 24, 2014

Termite Queen Clones Herself by Making Eggs Impervious to Sperm - Inkfish | DiscoverMagazine.com bit.ly/1AHGZ9r

Nov 24, 2014

RT @Inkfish: Don't want your mate's DNA in your daughter? Try secretly cloning yourself, say termite queens: blogs.discovermagazine.com/inkfish/2014/1…