Most talked about Discovery News stories

Unfinished vases found in Pompeii reveal panic as eruption loomed

news.discovery.com — French and Italian archaeologists digging out a pottery workshop in Pompeii have brought to light 10 raw clay vases, revealing a frozen-in-time picture of the exact moment panicked potters realized they were facing an impending catastrophe. The vases were found sealed under a layer of ash and pumice from Mount Vesuvius' devastating eruption of 79 A.D.

Ancient Egyptian Mummy Wearing Jewels Found

news.discovery.com — Spanish archaeologists digging in Egypt have unearthed a female mummy still wearing her jewels. The mummy was discovered in the necropolis below the temple of Pharaoh Thutmosis III (1490-1436 BC), on the west bank of the Nile in Luxor (southern Egypt). The find dates to the Middle Kingdom (2137-1781 BC).

1 in 3 Adults Drink Excessively, but Aren't Alcoholics

news.discovery.com — About a third of U.S. adults drink excessively, but most of these people are not alcoholics, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study analyzed information from more than 138,000 U.S. adults between 2009 and 2011.

Small 'Underwater Pompeii' Found Off Greek Island

news.discovery.com — Remains of an ancient settlement, complete with a ruined pottery workshop, have been found on the bottom of the Aegean sea off the small island of Delos, the Greek ministry of culture has announced. Dubbed by the Greek media "a small underwater Pompeii," the structures lay at a depth of just 6 feet on the northeastern coast of Delos.

Worm Lives in Man's Head for Four Years

news.discovery.com — A worm lived in a man's head near his brain for four years, according to a new study that also determined the parasite had an incredibly long genome. The research, conducted at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, reveals the genetic secrets of the elusive parasite with origins in the Far East.
Nov 21, 2014

Worm Lives in Man's Head for Four Years: No wonder this man wasn't feeling well: The worm causes sparganosis, ... bit.ly/1qCMZx2

10 Foods You Could Eat After a Global Catastrophe

news.discovery.com — If an asteroid strikes or a nuclear winter ensues, survivors could live on at least 10 foods that in some cases may seem gross but are all nutritious.
Nov 20, 2014

10 Foods You Could Eat After a Global Catastrophe: If an asteroid strikes or a nuclear winter ensues, survivor... bit.ly/1qz0EoQ

X-Rays: Next-Gen Way to Travel and Talk in Space?

news.discovery.com — NASA scientists say they have figured out a way to use X-rays to both communicate with long-distance spacecraft, as well as navigate as they sail past the outer limits of the solar system. They say that using X-rays is faster than existing radio wave communications, can carry more information and won't be blocked when spacecraft enter a planet's thick atmosphere.

Iceland Lava Field Is Larger Than Manhattan: Photos

news.discovery.com — A volcanic eruption at Iceland’s Holuhraun Lava Field is the largest since the 18th century.

Toronto Zoo Panda Has a Blast in First Winter Frolic

news.discovery.com — After wet snow blanketed the greater Toronto area on Monday, a male giant panda named Da Mao made the most of what was clearly an enjoyable turn of weather events for him, thestar.com reported.

Vases in Pompeii Reveal Panic Before Eruption

news.discovery.com — French and Italian archaeologists digging a pottery workshop in Pompeii have brought to light 10 raw clay vases, revealing a frozen-in-time picture of the exact moment panicked potters realized they were facing an impending catastrophe. The vases were found sealed under a layer of ash and pumice from Mount Vesuvius' devastating eruption of 79 A.D.