Most talked about The Economist stories

Canada’s astronomical boasting

economist.com — CANADIANS are known for humility. But leave the Earth's surface and you'll find the country's ego somewhere up in the thermosphere. Canada's government websites use doctored photographs of its contribution to the International Space Station to call special attention to itself.
Oct 31, 2014

RT @EconUS: O Canadarm! A country should not need to use doctored photos to get respect econ.st/108bKEG pic.twitter.com/MoPhtOzMUD

Show 21 more tweets from Josh Wingrove, Lloyd Alter and others...

Cracks in the atheist edifice

economist.com — THE coastal city of Wenzhou is sometimes called China's Jerusalem. Ringed by mountains and far from the capital, Beijing, it has long been a haven for a religion that China's Communist leaders view with deep unease: Christianity. Most cities of its size, with about 9m people, have no more than a dozen or so visibly Christian buildings.
Oct 31, 2014

RT @iandenisjohnson: An outstanding overview piece in @TheEconomist on the rapid spread of Christianity in China. economist.com/news/briefing/…

Oct 31, 2014

Experts think there are now more Christians than members of the Communist Party in China, most of them evangelicals. econ.st/1FYkcHB

Oct 31, 2014

Cracks in the atheist edifice: The rapid spread of Christianity in China is forcing an official rethink on religion: economist.com/news/briefing/…

Oct 31, 2014

An outstanding overview piece in @TheEconomist on the rapid spread of Christianity in China. economist.com/news/briefing/…

A modest proposal for the equitable treatment of the taller passenger

economist.com — THIS blog often applauds the impact that low-cost carriers have on the travelling habits of everyday consumers. Thanks to a canny mixture of operational efficiency...
Oct 31, 2014

Legroom on aeroplanes: A modest proposal for the equitable treatment of the taller passenger econ.st/1wLEAc3 via @TheEconomist

Oct 31, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: XL-sized travellers get a complimentary second seat on planes. Why not the tall? econ.st/13jrKWo pic.twitter.com/W0AOfagUCS

Oct 31, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: XL-sized travellers get a complimentary second seat on planes. Why not the tall? econ.st/13jrKWo pic.twitter.com/W0AOfagUCS

Oct 31, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: XL-sized travellers get a complimentary second seat on planes. Why not the tall? econ.st/13jrKWo pic.twitter.com/W0AOfagUCS

Oct 31, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: XL-sized travellers get a complimentary second seat on planes. Why not the tall? econ.st/13jrKWo pic.twitter.com/W0AOfagUCS

Show 1 more tweet from J. Carlisle Larsen

Ebola and politics

economist.com — ON SUNDAY scientists and physicians from around the world will be descending on New Orleans for the annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH), the world's leading convention on tropical diseases. The auspiciously timed gathering will include a number of high-profile sessions about Ebola, which promise to aid efforts to contain the disease.
Oct 31, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: A quarantine in New Orleans means Ebola experts will be unable to share their vital knowledge econ.st/1wQdbFX pic.twitter.com/KeBMrj4fHy

Oct 31, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: A quarantine in New Orleans means Ebola experts will be unable to share their vital knowledge econ.st/1wQdbFX pic.twitter.com/KeBMrj4fHy

Oct 31, 2014

RT @EconUS: Prioritising paranoia and politics over medicine and science is a terrible way to manage Ebola econ.st/1toSQ6U @natashaloder

Show 5 more tweets from Ananyo Bhattacharya, Natasha Loder and others...

Obituary: Gough Whitlam

economist.com — THE scene, perhaps the most dramatic in modern Australian politics, was replayed so often that it was a wonder the tape survived. Gough Whitlam, prime minister since 1972, now sensationally made ex-prime minister at a stroke by Her Majesty's representative, Governor-General Sir John Kerr, stood facing a phalanx of microphones on the steps of Parliament House.
Oct 31, 2014

Word of the day: Duumvirate. When there are two at the top. In Economist's obit for Gough Whitlam economist.com/news/obituary/…

Oct 31, 2014

The Gough Whitlam obit in @TheEconomist was always going to be a joy, and it is: econ.st/1u8oJnG

Oct 31, 2014

Scintillating Whitlam obit in Economist. "What the microphones did not pick up...was the swish of a purple robe" economist.com/news/obituary/…

The revolution is over

economist.com — TALKS to curb Iran's nuclear programme have less than a month to run. Even now, after 12 years of sporadic argument, Iran insists that it wants civilian nuclear power and not a bomb. But nobody really believes that.
Oct 31, 2014

"It says a lot about Iran that [Rohani's] cabinet contains more doctorates from American universities than Obama’s." econ.st/1FYoJto

Oct 31, 2014

RT @AntonLaGuardia: "The Revolution is over" special report on #Iran ow.ly/DAb06 Leader on nuke deal ow.ly/DAb07 (via@EconMEastAfrica)

Oct 31, 2014

Hassan Rohani's cabinet contains more members with doctorates from American universities than Barack Obama's econ.st/1FYoJto

Oct 30, 2014

RT @EconMedia: This week's cover: The new Iran and the prospects for a nuclear deal November 1st – 7th 2014 econ.trib.al/zdJg7fR pic.twitter.com/lZ7xxb47xa

Show 18 more tweets from Laura Rozen, Anton La Guardia and others...

China with legal characteristics

economist.com — DRAFTERS of Communist Party documents in China are masters of linguistic sleights; Deng Xiaoping invented the term "socialist market economy" to satisfy hardline ideologues while he steered the country towards capitalism. Now the party is trumpeting a new slogan: "Socialist rule of law with Chinese characteristics".
Oct 31, 2014

If Xi really wants to clean up the system, he should give citizens all rights in constitution. econ.st/1DDBeXz @TheEconomist

Beauties and beasts

economist.com — DRESSING up for Halloween is not just child's play. In America, around a third of adults will also don capes and splash on fake blood tonight, according to a survey by the National Retail Federation, a trade body.
Oct 31, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: Archive: Going ghoulish today? See our top US Halloween costumes chart from 2007: econ.st/1sRLViK pic.twitter.com/3sRzn6Fl7n

Orthodox Christianity in China

economist.com — AS A colleague has written in this week's print edition, Christianity in China is experiencing spectacular, but turbulent, growth; by one estimate, the number of Chinese Christians could by 2030 have reached 250m-the largest Christian population of any country in the world.
Oct 31, 2014

Orthodox Christianity in China: A comb worth fighting for | The Economist (blog) econ.st/1DDyIQW

Ukraine-Russia gas deal

economist.com — IT IS getting chilly in Kiev. During parliamentary elections on October 26th, as temperatures hit 7° Celsius, polling-station officials huddled in padded coats; one warmed her hand over an electric heater while handing out ballots with the other.
Oct 31, 2014

Ukraine needs gas, Russia needs money. Why let a little war interfere with profitable business operations? econ.st/1u0wDi9

Mr Matthew Bishop

economist.com — Our cookie policy has changed. Review our cookies policy for more details and to change your cookie preference.By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Location: New York, United States Languages: Contact: +1 212 541 0560 (office) Email this person Specialist Subjects: Biography Matthew Bishop is the Globalisation Editor of The Economist.

Daily chart: QE RIP

economist.com — Our cookie policy has changed. Review our cookies policy for more details and to change your cookie preference.By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. QE RIP by R.A., A.C.M. & L.P. The end of quantitative easing in America ON OCTOBER 29th the Federal Reserve brought to a close the monetary-stimulus programme known as "QE3".

The revolution is over

economist.com — FROM THE MOUNTAINS of the Caucasus to the waters of the Indian Ocean, Iranians are watching intently as their government haggles with foreign powers over trade sanctions imposed to restrain its nuclear programme. Pointing to a corner of his office, the owner of a struggling cannery says: "See that television set?
Oct 30, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: If you watch or read the American media, you probably have no idea what modern Iran is like econ.st/1nTiDou pic.twitter.com/MUfwqbANeg

Show 5 more tweets from Diana Cariboni, Josh Greenman and others...

Money and happiness

economist.com — Our cookie policy has changed. Review our cookies policy for more details and to change your cookie preference.By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Money and happiness by J.S. & A.M.
Show 2 more tweets from Kevin Anderson, Shubham Mukherjee

Everything that rises must converge

economist.com — POETS, songwriters and left-wing politicians hate the idea, but for decades opinion-poll evidence has been clear: money buys happiness and the richer you are, the more likely you are to express satisfaction with your life. Until now.
Oct 31, 2014

China’s GDP rose annually by 10% in 2007-14 and its happiness level rose 26 points. econ.st/1DDCrxQ @TheEconomist

Oct 31, 2014

Just over 40% of Indians consider themselves happy (and globally, the richer you are, the happier) econ.st/1FYoJts via @TheEconomist

Hungary's internet tax

economist.com — VIKTOR ORBAN has finally hit a speed bump. The popular Hungarian prime minister had been on an unstoppable roll this year, winning a two-thirds majority in parliament and waving off foreign criticism of his increasingly illiberal policies. But this week Mr Orban and his governing Fidesz party suddenly faced an unaccustomed sight: tens of thousands of protestors in the streets of Budapest (pictured).
Oct 31, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: Hungarian PM Viktor Orban was on an unstoppable roll. Then he decided to tax the internet econ.st/1yJo1vf pic.twitter.com/Cn0TzBoDFM

Oct 31, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: Hungarian PM Viktor Orban was on an unstoppable roll. Then he decided to tax the internet econ.st/1yJo1vf pic.twitter.com/Cn0TzBoDFM

Oct 30, 2014

RT @mattsteinglass: Hungarian PM Viktor Orban was on an unstoppable roll. Then he decided to tax the internet econ.st/1FYz9t7

Oct 30, 2014

RT @EconEurope: Hungarian PM Viktor Orban was on an unstoppable roll. Then he decided to tax the internet econ.st/1FYz9t7

Show 1 more tweet from Matt Steinglass

The revolution is over

economist.com — Our cookie policy has changed. Review our cookies policy for more details and to change your cookie preference.By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

A glimmer of hope

economist.com — JUST two months ago the bodies of Ebola victims turned away from teeming treatment centres lay dead in the streets of Monrovia, the capital of Liberia. Now, in those same facilities, many of the beds lie empty. Could the outbreak that has so devastated the country finally be subsiding?

The war against Islamic State

economist.com — "WE WILL resist to our last drop of blood together... if necessary we will repeat the Stalingrad resistance in Kobane." The words of Polat Can, a Syrian Kurdish commander, to describe the fight against Islamic State (IS) jihadists for the town on the Syrian-Turkish border may exaggerate the scale of the fighting, but makes plain the emotional and strategic symbolism now attached to Kobane.