Most talked about The Economist stories

What China means by "democracy"

economist.com — RECENTLY Tony Abbott, the prime minister of Australia, embarrassed himself a little by gushing over Chinese President Xi Jinping's talk of China becoming "democratic". Specifically Mr Xi said China had the goal of becoming "a modern socialist country that is prosperous, democratic, culturally advanced and harmonious" by the middle of the century.
Nov 26, 2014

Politics while waiting for #lateline. Tony Abbott hailed Xi's promise of democracy in China by 2050. Not so fast: economist.com/blogs/economis…

Nov 26, 2014

For all you Tony Abbott fans out there, I wrote about what China means by "democracy" economist.com/blogs/economis…

House prices at the border

economist.com — IT IS tempting for economists to couch Europe's great debates-over immigration, burden-sharing, competitiveness-in technocratic terms. What effect do new arrivals have on the wages of the local population? How can debts be mutualised without giving debtor countries an incentive to spend wildly?
Nov 26, 2014

Really interesting piece on the large differences in house prices along either side of the Dutch-German border: economist.com/blogs/freeexch…

Nov 26, 2014

The value that Dutch people attach to living among their fellow-countrymen economist.com/blogs/freeexch… @mattsteinglass

Daily chart: OPEC flexing

economist.com — Our cookie policy has changed. Review our cookies policy for more details and to change your cookie preference.By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. OPEC flexing by THE DATA TEAM OIL ministers from the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) will meet on November 27 th in Vienna to discuss what to do about falling oil prices.

The bravery of the batsman

economist.com — PHIL HUGHES, an Australian cricketer, is in a critical condition after being hit on the head by a short-pitched ball yesterday. Mr Hughes, who was playing for South...
Nov 26, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: Cricket is an inherently dangerous sport. But could helmets be making cricketers less safe? econ.st/1rulFfo pic.twitter.com/dK8ARIv5lx

Nov 26, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: Cricket is an inherently dangerous sport. But could helmets be making cricketers less safe? econ.st/1rulFfo pic.twitter.com/dK8ARIv5lx

The worst American airports for winter flying

By Old Row
economist.com — WINTER weather wreaks all sorts of havoc on business travellers. But perhaps the worst consequence of snowshowers, hailstorms and outright blizzards are the flight...

The Ferguson verdict

economist.com — HOW surprised should we be that a grand jury in Missouri failed to indict a police officer for killing an unarmed black man? In one sense, very surprised: it is very...
Nov 26, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: Police officers sometimes kill people for no good reason. They're almost never indicted for it econ.st/1yX6fEI pic.twitter.com/Gl5VadsVqf

Nov 26, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: Police officers sometimes kill people for no good reason. They're almost never indicted for it econ.st/1yX6fEI pic.twitter.com/Gl5VadsVqf

Nov 26, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: Police officers sometimes kill people for no good reason. They're almost never indicted for it econ.st/1yX6fEI pic.twitter.com/Gl5VadsVqf

Nov 26, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: White Americans need to recognise that if black Americans mistrust the police, they often have good reason to do so econ.st/1ybaflE

Nov 26, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: Police officers sometimes kill people for no good reason. They're almost never indicted for it econ.st/1yX6fEI pic.twitter.com/Gl5VadsVqf

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The million-dollar debutant

economist.com — TWO years ago Matthew Thomas was settling into his eighth year teaching at a high school in New York City. He had nearly finished writing a 640-page, loosely autobiographical, debut novel about an Irish-American family's rise into the middle class in the face of the husband's crippling illness.

The Americas: Justin time

economist.com — Nothing enrages Canada's ruling Conservatives more than to hear the third-party Liberals described as the natural governing party of Canada. The Liberals may have held office for much of the last century, but the Tories have held sway since early 2006.
Nov 26, 2014

This punditry from the Economist offers first suggestion I've seen/heard that federal election will be delayed. economist.com/news/21631839-…

Harvard under fire

economist.com — IN 1978 the Supreme Court, in the Bakke case, struck down racial quotas in higher education. Summing up, Justice Lewis Powell called the undergraduate admissions...

Payback time | The Economist

economist.com — In 2015 the chief executives of big multinationals will worry a lot about pay: not their own, but that of their toiling staff. Rising labour costs will squeeze profit margins, which are at peak levels. Bosses will have to decide whether to resist or accommodate this pressure.

The Canada Summit

economist.com — It's time for Canada to apply fresh thinking to policy-making and business strategy to unleash the country's potential as a global powerhouse. The Economist's first-ever Canada Summit will explore the pressing ques
Nov 26, 2014

The Canada Summit by The Economist Dec. 3 in Toronto -- magazine's first confab on Canadian issues ow.ly/EsCs6

Deflation and the markets

economist.com — THE longer the chart, the clearer the picture can become. At the start of 2014, it was hard to find an investor who was bullish on government bonds; economic growth...

Hyphens | The Economist

economist.com — There is no firm rule to help you decide which words are run together, hyphenated or left separate. In general, try to avoid putting hyphens into words formed of one word and a short prefix, so asexual, biplane, declassify, disfranchise, geopolitical, neoclassicism, neoconservative, neoliberal, neolithic, neologism, neonatal, overdone, overeducated, preoccupied, preordained, prepay, realign, redirect, reopen, reorder, subhuman, underdone, upended, tetravalent, etc.
Nov 26, 2014

It's great that @economist puts its style guide online: economist.com/style-guide/hy… Reinforces its brand as a pub devoted to excellent writing

On the streets of Ferguson

economist.com — "IT IS not as bad as they say," insisted Kelly. At the Marley's Bar & Grill, a place she runs with her husband Martin on South Florissant Road in Ferguson,...
Nov 25, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: Police departments are frequently not good at their core function. #Ferguson is not an outlier econ.st/1y9Dmpo pic.twitter.com/jIiWVRyuGO

Nov 25, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: Police departments are frequently not good at their core function. #Ferguson is not an outlier econ.st/1y9Dmpo pic.twitter.com/jIiWVRyuGO

Nov 25, 2014

How Ferguson’s police handled Mr Brown’s shooting/aftermath symptomatic of problems of race, class, law econ.st/1ySn97j @TheEconomist

The voucher business

economist.com — PHYSICAL resemblance may lead to physical attraction, according to Jorn Eiting, a founder of Soul2Match, a Californian site that sets up dates for its users by comparing their faces. To stop cheats (people who post fake photos "that make them look like Brad Pitt") he has hooked up with miiCard, a service that uses bank-account data to verify online identities.

The world in numbers: Countries

economist.com — Algirdas Butkevicius of the Social Democratic Party leads an ideologically diverse coalition, but all parties are agreed on the broad direction: an open economy, close alignment with Western powers in foreign policy and strong support for European integration. Energy security will be a policy priority; Russia supplies 100% of the country's gas at present.
Nov 26, 2014

RT @EconWorldin: #Lithuania will become the 19th member of the euro zone on January 1st as the litas gives way to the euro econ.st/1FgUInB

The world in numbers: Industries

economist.com — Five years after the Great Recession, the global economy is in dispiriting shape. But 2015 holds hope of improvement. Developing countries will rediscover some missing momentum, to expand by 5.3%; rich-world nations, too, will speed up to 2.5% growth, thanks largely to a revitalised US.

The world in numbers: Countries

economist.com — Forever encircled, Germany is confronting ill winds from a revanchist Russia and an economically enfeebled Europe. Angela Merkel, the chancellor, in effect the European Union's interlocutor, is held back by an electorate unwilling to shoulder the cost of supporting the euro or standing up to Russia.
Nov 26, 2014

RT @EconWorldin: The world in numbers: In #Germany, caution will characterise economic policy at home and growth will be modest econ.st/1C4mKo6

The Ferguson verdict

economist.com — THANKS to a number of leaks, it was no surprise when Robert McCulloch announced that a grand jury did not indict Darren Wilson, the white police officer who...
Nov 25, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: As the Ferguson trial reaffirms, it's very hard to indict a police officer for killing someone econ.st/1rndnpq pic.twitter.com/7umFrODPBF

Nov 25, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: As the Ferguson trial reaffirms, it's very hard to indict a police officer for killing someone econ.st/1rndnpq pic.twitter.com/7umFrODPBF

Nov 25, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: As the Ferguson trial reaffirms, it's very hard to indict a police officer for killing someone econ.st/1rndnpq pic.twitter.com/7umFrODPBF

Nov 25, 2014

RT @TheEconomist: As the Ferguson trial reaffirms, it's very hard to indict a police officer for killing someone econ.st/1rndnpq pic.twitter.com/7umFrODPBF

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