Most talked about Fast Company stories

New York Times Chief Data Scientist Chris Wiggins On The Way We Create And Consume Content Now

Jul 24, 2014

"How important is it that people engage regularly?" --@NYTimes' chief data scientist on the way we do content now fastcompany.com/3033254/most-c…

Jul 24, 2014

How the @nytimes is using data, and how it might use it in the future: bit.ly/1sXWAh6

Jul 24, 2014

RT @stevesooch: "How important is it that people engage regularly?" --@NYTimes' chief data scientist on the way we do content now: fastcompany.com/3033254/most-c…

Jul 24, 2014

RT @FastCompany: @nytimes chief data scientist Chris Wiggins (@chrishwiggins) on how we create and consume content: f-st.co/6PXaSgx

A Simulator That Lets You Fight The Giant Monsters From Pacific Rim? Yes, Please

fastcompany.com — You can already swap bodies with someone of the opposite sex and explore 's Upper West Side apartment using virtual reality. What you haven't been able to do, though, is punch a gigantic monster in the face. Thankfully, that will soon change.

Five Ways Watson Will Change Computing

fastcompany.com — Watson, IBM's artificial intelligence computing platform, is changing the way we compute. From its roots as a robotic contestant on Jeopardy, the machine-learning marvel is now being positioned as a tool for doctors, businesspeople, and scientists worldwide--one that can answer any question posed to it in natural English.

These New Billboards Talk To Your Smartphone

fastcompany.com — Clear Channel Outdoor, one of the world's largest advertising companies, has a vision: smart billboards enabled with NFC and QR codes that beam content to the phones of passersby with a bump or even perhaps just a nod. These high-tech billboards, part of a project called Connect, debuted in Europe earlier this year.
Jul 24, 2014

At @fastcompany, why @disney @ccoutdoor's new billboards are beaming movie trailers to your smartphone. fastcompany.com/3033242/these-…

Madefire's Digital Comics Come to Android

fastcompany.com — Back in 2012, a Bay Area startup called Madefire introduced "motion books"--digital comics which melded simple animation and sound effects with traditional graphic storytelling elements such as panels and word balloons. They were available only on the iPad at first and, indeed, felt like they'd been invented to be read on Apple's tablet.
Jul 24, 2014

I talked to the folks at Madefire about their new comics app for Android & competing with Amazon/ComiXology. fastcompany.com/3033462/madefi…

Which State Has The Cheapest Legal Pot? Leafly Tells You

fastcompany.com — For one of the most discussed products in the country, there's a lot we don't know about marijuana. That's beginning to change. Leafly, a Seattle-based company that claims to be the largest online resource and community for cannabis, released a document that offers a whiff of the data it has collected about the domestic legal marijuana business, estimated to be growing at 68% a year.

When Wearable Tech Saves Your Life, You Won’t Take It Off

fastcompany.com — The problem with wearables is that usually people stop wearing them. According to one recent report, one-third of users of activity-tracking wearables, like the Fitbit and the Jawbone, toss their devices aside after just six months.
Jul 24, 2014

When Wearable Tech Saves Your Life, You Won’t Take It Off bit.ly/1rydW2a

Jul 24, 2014

RT @hjsoch: When Wearable Tech Saves Your Life, You Won’t Take It Off flip.it/Tl8Z8

5 Dream Jobs You Probably Didn't Know Exist

Jul 24, 2014

.@meganhchan Panda nanny is a real thing! 5 dream jobs you probably didn't know exist fastcompany.com/3033437/5-drea… by @RGillett23

Jul 24, 2014

@FastCompany: 5 Dream Jobs You Probably Didn't Know Exist f-st.co/qU8C5wj” panda nanny? & I thought I had it good

Why You Should Be Working From Home Today

fastcompany.com — If you decide you'd like to try working from home, you know the usual advice: schedule a meeting with your supervisor, and ask to try it one day a week. But which day? For most people, the default answer is "Friday," which makes sense. Your manager knows that Friday is less productive than, say, Tuesday.