Most talked about National Geographic stories

New Wildfire Science Shows That Small Steps Can Save Homes, Communities

news.nationalgeographic.com — Warren Cornwall Published July 30, 2014 When a wildfire swept through 2,000 acres in the hills north of San Diego, California, in May, it left behind a curious checkerboard of destruction. One neighborhood was reduced to ashes and twisted metal. But houses nearby suffered little more than scorched grass and singed trees.
Jul 30, 2014

New Wildfire Science Shows That Small Steps Can Save Homes, Communities on.natgeo.com/1nIIDRt via @NatGeo

Jul 30, 2014

How some San Diego homes survived the May wildfires and why others didn’t bit.ly/1nJsUBA via @NatGeo

Octopus Cares For Her Eggs For 53 Months, Then Dies

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — In April of 2007, Bruce Robison sent a submersible into a huge underwater canyon in California's Monterey Bay. At the canyon's base, 1400 metres below the surface, he spotted a lone female octopus-Graneledone boreopacifica-crawling towards a rocky slope. The team sent the sub to the same site 38 days later and found the same female, easily recognisable through her distinctive scars.
Jul 30, 2014

RT @FloridaMuseum: We've always loved octopi, now we love them even more. Octomom broods eggs 4.5 years, makes ultimate sacrifice: tinyurl.com/pd2awpv

Jul 30, 2014

RT @flashboy: If you'd like to cry about an octopus I can strongly recommend this article on.natgeo.com/WNv9tz

I Heart My City: Igor’s Venice

intelligenttravel.nationalgeographic.com — Venice native Igor Scomparin led tours all over Europe with Globus for a decade before returning home to be a "local host" for Monograms. Now, this tourism industry veteran's mission is to show the real, authentic Venice to travelers who come to visit his homeland.
Jul 30, 2014

RT @Marilyn_Res: Why Venetians go around the columns in St. Mark's Square, not through them ow.ly/zyI4F via @NatGeoTravel

Jul 30, 2014

RT @Marilyn_Res: Why Venetians go around the columns in St. Mark's Square, not through them ow.ly/zyI4F via @NatGeoTravel

Longest-Living Octopus Found, Guards Eggs for Record 4.5 Years

newswatch.nationalgeographic.com — If you thought nine months was long, consider watching over your eggs for four and half years-only to die at the end. A deep-sea octopus, Graneledone boreopacifica, has set a new record for brooding stamina-53 months, the longest developmental period known for any organism, according to a study published July 30 in the journal PLOS ONE .
Jul 30, 2014

A deep-sea octopus guarded her eggs for 4.5 years—which in the process makes her the longest-lived octopus known! bit.ly/1s4VCgt

Narcolepsy Paper Retracted

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Well, this is disappointing. Last December, I wrote a story for Nature News about a new paper, published in Science Translational Medicine, which seemed to confirm narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease. Here's what I wrote at the time: Narcolepsy is mostly caused by the gradual loss of neurons that produce hypocretin, a hormone that keeps us awake.
Jul 30, 2014

A big narcolepsy paper that I reported on last year has been retracted. Hate it when that happens. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/07/30/nar…

Why Deadly Ebola Virus Is Likely to Hit the U.S. But Not Spread

news.nationalgeographic.com — Karen Weintraub Published July 29, 2014 As the worst Ebola outbreak in human history rages across West Africa, the obvious question Americans are asking is: Could it come here? The answer is yes, it probably will. But it's not worth losing sleep over, experts say.

Nat Geo Staff Picks: America’s Best Beach Towns

intelligenttravel.nationalgeographic.com — Is there a magic formula for the perfect beach town? No, but America could offer up more than a few candidates if they were doling out the title. Here are just a few of them, recommended by Nat Geo Travel staffers.

Gas Cloud Wrapped in Dark Matter Is Like a Speeding Cosmic Burrito

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Wrapped in dark matter, an object known as the Smith Cloud is hurtling toward the Milky Way at more than 150 miles per second. Now 8,000 light-years away, the gassy clump of hydrogen is expected to smash into the galaxy in about 30 million years.

101 Geysers Spotted Erupting From Saturn Moon

newswatch.nationalgeographic.com — Erupting from fractures, 101 geysers dot the surface of Saturn's frozen moon, Enceladus, report NASA scientists. First spotted as plumes in 2005, the total number of geysers has been revealed by a long series of overflights by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.