Most talked about National Geographic stories

These Mice Excel At Assembling The Ideal Sperm Swim Teams

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — In humans, it's every sperm for itself: sperm cells race to reach an egg and the first one there gets to fertilise it. But in many other animals, sperm can clump together to form cooperative bundles that outswim any solo cells. Take the deer mouse.
Jul 23, 2014

These Mice Excel At Assembling The Ideal Sperm Swim Teams bit.ly/WFg6Su from @edyong209

Jul 23, 2014

Teams that traditionally work well with 7 members: the Avengers; the Justice League; these rat sperm. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/07/23/the…

Jul 23, 2014

RT @edyong209: 7 sperm make the ideal swim team & promiscuous mice are best at hitting that number. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/07/23/the… By me, on @hopih…

Jul 23, 2014

7 sperm make the ideal swim team & promiscuous mice are best at hitting that number. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/07/23/the… By me, on @hopihoekstra's latest

American-Born Gangs Helping Drive Immigrant Crisis at U.S. Border

news.nationalgeographic.com — Scott Johnson Published July 23, 2014 Kelvin Arita has made the long, overland journey from Honduras to the United States twice in recent years, and twice has been sent home by U.S. authorities. On both trips he saw more horrors than he cares to remember: Young kids maimed by trains they had hoped would take them through Mexico.
Jul 23, 2014

RT @scott_c_johnson: American born gangs helping fuel the migrant crisis and, with Mex cartels, destabilizing Central America. @NatGeo bit.ly/1rMvjeN

Jul 23, 2014

RT @NatGeoMag: American-born gangs are to blame for much of violence in Central America that is spurring immigration crisis on.natgeo.com/1qAmM1C

Jul 23, 2014

American-born gangs are helping drive immigrant crisis at U.S. border. on.natgeo.com/1rBtggd via @scott_c_johnson

Jul 23, 2014

How L.A.'s gang culture is driving the child-immigration crisis at the U.S. border on.natgeo.com/1rBtggd via @NatGeo

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news.nationalgeographic.com — Joey Fening Published July 23, 2014 The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has been declaring a lot of no-fly zones lately. On Tuesday, after a rocket struck about a mile from Israel's Ben Gurion International Airport, the FAA prohibited U.S. airlines from flying to or from the airport for up to 24 hours.
Jul 23, 2014

Cool but scary global map on @FAANews' ever-evolving no-fly zones and restricted airspaces on.natgeo.com/1rBaS71 via @maggiemacy