Most talked about National Geographic stories

In Jungles of India, New Phone App Helps Indigenous Tribes Embroiled in Maoist Insurgency

news.nationalgeographic.com — Anthony Loyd Published September 26, 2014 BHANPUR, India-An Android app designed to give voice to tribes at the heart of India's Maoist insurgency was launched September 20 as part of a campaign by activists to end the conflict through the combination of oral tradition and new technology.
Oct 23, 2014

In Jungles of India, New Phone App Helps Indigenous Tribes Embroiled in #Maoist Insurgency - on.natgeo.com/ZXIoJi via @NatGeo

For Bhutan, it Takes a Community to Save the Snow Leopard

newswatch.nationalgeographic.com — The snow leopard, like most of the world's big cats, survives by keeping a low profile. Yet its secretive nature and penchant for living among some of the steepest, remotest mountain ranges on the planet have not saved the cat from human intrusions throughout most of its range.
Oct 23, 2014

For Bhutan, it Takes a Community to Save the Snow Leopard on.natgeo.com/1xcxud5 via @NatGeo

Photographing Giant Tortoises on an Island That Wants to Kill You

proof.nationalgeographic.com — Thomas Peschak is full of energy. Passionate, full-blown, infectious, energy. When I sat down to interview him for a series of blog posts about his recent trip to Aldabra Atoll for National Geographic Magazine, he stoked the conversation with a mix of heady scientific research, and down-and-dirty descriptions about what life is like for tortoises-and photographers-on the brutally harsh island environment.
Oct 23, 2014

Photographing Giant Tortoises on an Island That Wants to Kill You | PROOF on.natgeo.com/1FCk2p0

Photo of the Day

photography.nationalgeographic.com — A Napoleon wrasse swims through a school of fish in the Great Barrier Reef in this Photo of the Day from the National Geographic Photo Contest.

Mountain Goats Are Shrinking-A Lot-Because of Global Warming

news.nationalgeographic.com — Brian Clark Howard Published October 22, 2014 Wild mountain goats in the Italian Alps have gotten significantly smaller over the past few decades in response to a warming climate, scientists reported Tuesday.

Deinocheirus Exposed: Meet The Body Behind the Terrible Hand

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — For 50 years, the dinosaur was just a pair of arms. But what arms! Each was eight feet (2.4 metres) long, and ended in three eight-inch (20-centimetre) claws. You can understand why the scientists who discovered this beast called it Deinocheirus mirificus, from the Greek for "terrible hand, which is unusual".
Oct 23, 2014

Deinocheirus Exposed: Meet The Body Behind the Terrible Hand bit.ly/1rjK1YN from @edyong209

Oct 22, 2014

RT @wendyzuk: Brilliant. Scientists solve 50 year old dino puzzle - so discovering this awesome beasty phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/22/dei… pic.twitter.com/99uu6UjtQi

Oct 22, 2014

"Deinocheirus was much weirder than anyone imagined—like something out of a bad sci-fi movie.“ bit.ly/1ylIeHr pic.twitter.com/iZ7vmBsgnd

Oct 22, 2014

RT @edyong209: Meet Deinocheirus, a colossal, horse-faced, toothless, slow-moving, hump-backed, fan-tailed, giant-clawed dinosaur. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/22/dei…

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