Most talked about National Geographic stories

How An Antibiotic Gene Jumped All Over The Tree of Life

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Every living thing on the planet has to contend with bacteria. To many viruses, they are prey. To other bacteria, they are competitors. To animals and plants, they can be the cause of devastating diseases or beneficial partners that provide everything from nutrition to immunity to light.
Oct 24, 2014

RT @carlzimmer: How an antibiotic gene jumped all around the tree of life. Research by @Symbionticism &co. reported by @edyong209 http://t.…

Oct 24, 2014

How an antibiotic gene jumped all around the tree of life. Research by @Symbionticism &co. reported by @edyong209 phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/24/how…

Oct 24, 2014

How An Antibiotic Gene Jumped All Over The Tree of Life bit.ly/1ru0cmd from @edyong209

Oct 24, 2014

How an antibiotic gene jumped all over the tree of life. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/24/how… My new piece on @symbioticism's upcoming paper. Ft @surt_lab

Male Birds Poison Themselves to Appear Sexier-a First

news.nationalgeographic.com — Jason Bittel Published October 24, 2014 The lengths we go to for love can sometimes be dramatic-and so it is for male great bustards (Otis tarda), whose daredevil diet of poisonous beetles may actually help them get a date, a new study reveals.
Oct 24, 2014

Male bustards poison themselves to appear sexier to females—apparently a first in nature. Are you surprised?bit.ly/12qe3nY

Oct 24, 2014

Sounds about right RT @hofrench RT @NatGeo: Male birds poison themselves to look healthier: on.natgeo.com/1nCe4ib

See What This Man Can Create From a Bush

video.nationalgeographic.com — Oct. 24, 2014 - Tourists from all around the world come to Bishopville, South Carolina, to see Pearl Fryar's topiary garden. Fryar spends five to ten years getting each plant to take shape. He hopes visitors will learn valuable lessons about perseverance from his creations.

The New World of Travel Writing

intelligenttravel.nationalgeographic.com — As a writer, editor, and teacher, I care about travel writing that matters. My own journey of learning about and reflecting on the ever-evolving world of travel writing and publishing is a continual one, propelled each year by the Book Passage Travel Writers and Photographers Conference, held each summer in the Bay Area, where I live.

The Storytellers of Cooking: Treasured Books I Can’t Live Without

theplate.nationalgeographic.com — by José Andrés It's back to school season, and as I watch my daughters prepare for another year of their education, I like to reconnect with mine, too. I'm drawn into my library at home, where some of my second most valuable possessions, after my daughters, of course, are sitting, stacked next to each other on shelves.

Going Platinum: Reframing the Native American Experience

proof.nationalgeographic.com — I had heard of platinum prints before, but I wasn't really sure what made them unique. So I asked Heather Shannon, a photo archivist at the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI), to explain their significance.
Oct 24, 2014

Two Native American photographers return to the process used by Edward Curtis in the 19th century to chronicle life ow.ly/DiF9n

Elusive Wolverine Caught on Camera

voices.nationalgeographic.com — By Laurie McClellan for National Geographic, Polar Bear Watch It's one of the most elusive superstars of the northern wilderness: the wolverine. Nicknamed "the devil bear" for its fierce disposition, the wolverine is known to hunt moose and even tangle with grizzlies.
Oct 24, 2014

RT @NatGeo: Elusive wolverine nicknamed the "devil bear" spotted on camera: on.natgeo.com/1shRdDQ

Monster Sunspot Threatens Earth With Solar Storms

voices.nationalgeographic.com — The solar eclipse may steal the week's heavenly headlines, but a monster sunspot-the likes of which hasn't been seen for years-has turned toward Earth and may spew some serious solar storms. From the moment the gigantic s unspot cluster known as AR 2192 appeared on the eastern side of the sun on October 17, NASA solar scientists knew it was going to be a whopper.

One-Fifth of Human Genes Have Been Patented, Study Reveals

news.nationalgeographic.com — A new study shows that 20 percent of human genes have been patented in the United States, primarily by private firms and universities. The study, which is reported this week in the journal Science, is the first time that a detailed map has been created to match patents to specific physical locations on the human genome.

The World's Best Cities

shop.nationalgeographic.com — Delving into the heart and soul of more than 225 cities worldwide, this National Geographic travel volume is a glossy, glorious tribute to cosmopolitan life.
Oct 24, 2014

RT @FeatherAndFlip: Christmas shopping complete for all our traveling family. Great job, @natgeo and @anniefitz! shop.nationalgeographic.com/ngs/product/bo… … via @NatGeoStore

World's Longest Snake Has Virgin Birth-First Recorded in Species

news.nationalgeographic.com — Linda Qiu Published October 23, 2014 Virgin birth has been documented in the world's longest snake for the first time, a recent study says. An 11-year-old reticulated python named Thelma produced six female offspring in June 2012 at the Louisville Zoo in Kentucky, where she lives with another female python, Louise.
Oct 24, 2014

Have you heard the story of the six Jesus pythons in Kentucky? No father snakes. Just miracles. j.mp/1siNc20

Oct 24, 2014

"World's Longest Snake Has Virgin Birth—First Recorded in Species" ow.ly/DiuBG

Oct 23, 2014

A reticulated python called Thelma gave birth without sex—the 1st case of virgin birth in the world's longest snake. bit.ly/1whYRFU

Oct 23, 2014

RT @NatGeo World's longest snake has virgin birth—first recorded in species: on.natgeo.com/1wnw7cl

I Heart My National Park: Guadalupe Mountains

intelligenttravel.nationalgeographic.com — The Guadalupe Mountains of West Texas were once a reef growing beneath the waters of an ancient inland sea. That same vanished sea spawned the honeycomb of the Carlsbad Caverns, just 40 miles north across the New Mexico border. From the highway, the mountains resemble a nearly monolithic wall through the desert.