Most talked about National Geographic stories

The Central Park Zoo Hidden From View

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — In 2003, an army of 350 scientists and volunteers swept out across Central Park. Their mission, called a BioBlitz, was to find as many species as possible over the course of 24 hours. At the end of the day, they had compiled a catalog of 836 species of plants and animals.
Oct 01, 2014

RT @carlzimmer: New on the Loom: Where can you go to a 843-acre preserve with 167,000 species? Answer: Central Park phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/01/the…

Oct 01, 2014

New on the Loom: Where can you go to a 843-acre preserve with 167,000 species? Answer: Central Park phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/01/the…

Top Shot: Lone Lighthouse

tumblr.com — Top Shot: Lone Lighthouse Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day's Daily Dozen. The Daily Dozen is 12 photos chosen by the Your Shot editors each day from thousands of recent uploads. Our community has the chance to vote for their favorite from the selection.

Gut Bacteria Still Get Fed When Hosts Are Too Sick to Eat

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — For bacteria, the mammalian gut is like Shangri-La. It's warm and consistently so, sheltered from the environment, and regularly flooded with a nutritious soup. But what happens when this all-you-can-eat buffet stops serving? What happens to microbes if their host stops eating?
Oct 01, 2014

Gut Bacteria Still Get Fed When Hosts Are Too Sick to Eat bit.ly/1rJXi0p from @edyong209

Oct 01, 2014

Gut bacteria still get fed, even when hosts are sick and stop eating. My take on a cool new study phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/01/gut…