Most talked about National Geographic stories

Climate Forecast: More Southwest Droughts and Australian Floods

news.nationalgeographic.com — Warren Cornwall Published January 26, 2015 People living around the Pacific Ocean, including in parts of Asia, Australia, and western North and South America, should expect wilder climate swings in the 21st century.

Measles Are Back: Key Questions and Answers on Disease, Vaccinations

news.nationalgeographic.com — Karen Weintraub Published January 24, 2015 The battle against measles in the United States was considered won 15 years ago. Starting in 2000, virtually all new cases of measles came from abroad, and the disease was no longer regularly seen in the U.S. But around 60 people have contracted measles in the U.S.
Jan 26, 2015

RT @APIC: Measles are back, via @NatGeo @kweintraub "Cover your mouth when you cough [...] and wash your hands often. news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2015/01/1…

What Climate Change Looks Like, ‘Everyday’

proof.nationalgeographic.com — Good ideas tend to spread like wildfire on the Internet. This has proved to be true for the Everyday family of accounts on Instagram. The original account, @EverydayAfrica, is the brainchild of photographer Peter DiCampo and friends.

I Heart My National Park: Everglades

intelligenttravel.nationalgeographic.com — Conservation photographer and National Geographic Emerging Explorer Carlton Ward, Jr. , has been captivated by Florida's Everglades National Park since he was a child. So much so that he's made protecting it-and the amazing wildlife that lives there-his life's work.

Slugs and Bugs: 6 Bizarre Animal Mascots in U.S. Sports

news.nationalgeographic.com — Liz Langley Published January 25, 2015 Ever been psyched out by a clam? Probably not, but that doesn't stop many U.S. sports teams from choosing small and, some might say, unsightly animals to represent themselves. But what these critters lack in beauty they make up for in toughness and resilience-hence their role as mascots.

New Proposal to Protect Alaskan Wilderness Most Sweeping in Decades

news.nationalgeographic.com — Craig Welch Published January 25, 2015 No president in 35 years has made as sweeping a conservation proposal as President Barack Obama did today by urging Congress to transform the oil-laden coastal plain of Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge into what would be the largest wilderness area in the nation's history.

Why Bill Nye Calls Evolution 'Undeniable' and Creationism 'Inane'

news.nationalgeographic.com — Jane J. Lee Published January 25, 2015 With a jaunty bow tie and boyish enthusiasm, Bill Nye the Science Guy has spent decades decoding scientific topics, from germs to volcanoes, for television audiences. Last February, the former engineer defended the theory of evolution in a televised debate with young-Earth creationist Ken Ham, a vocal member of a group that believes the Earth is only 6,000 years old.

Rosetta Spacecraft, First to Orbit Comet, Finds Surprises Aplenty

Jan 26, 2015

Rosetta Spacecraft, First to Orbit Comet, Finds Surprises Aplenty on.natgeo.com/1L89T6p

The Cost of Climate Change in 2050

ngm.nationalgeographic.com — Higher seas mean greater financial exposure for coastal cities, where populations are growing and the value of buildings and infrastructure is increasing. More frequent flooding would likely disrupt insurance underwriting and with it the financing that drives development in cities such as Miami.

Mass Death of Seabirds in Western U.S. Is 'Unprecedented'

news.nationalgeographic.com — Craig Welch Published January 23, 2015 In the storm debris littering a Washington State shoreline, Bonnie Wood saw something grisly: the mangled bodies of dozens of scraggly young seabirds. Walking half a mile along the beach at Twin Harbors State Park on Wednesday, Wood spotted more than 130 carcasses of juvenile Cassin's auklets -the blue-footed, palm-size victims of what is becoming one of the largest mass die-offs of seabirds ever recorded.
Jan 25, 2015

What's causing the "massive, unprecedented" seabird die-off along the west coast? @CraigAWelch reports on.natgeo.com/1BScI8M via @NatGeo

Jan 24, 2015

Mass Death of Seabirds in Western U.S. Is 'Unprecedented' on.natgeo.com/15ns9Ya via @NatGeo

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Photo of the Day

photography.nationalgeographic.com — A yellow-billed Alpine chough flies above Italy's Gran Paradiso National Park in this National Geographic Photo of the Day from Stefano Unterthiner.
Jan 24, 2015

Gran Paradiso Massif Image, Italy -- National Geographic Photo of the Day on.natgeo.com/1B2T44z

Week's Best Space Pictures: Stars Wheel, a Balloon Hoists, and a Storm Churns

news.nationalgeographic.com — Stars careen across the Himalaya, scientists search for an afterglow, and a cyclone kicks up a fuss in this week's best space pictures.

Our Favorite Photos of the Food We Eat, From Plow to Plate

news.nationalgeographic.com — From sugarcane farmers in Mozambique to fishermen on the Philippines's Sulu Sea, here's a collection of some of the best photographs from our Future of Food series.

Sand Surfing the Sahara

National Geographic Magazine - NGM.com

ngm.nationalgeographic.com — Peeking from its burrow, a puffin snips off a bloom to dress up its temporary home on Skomer Island, where 6,000 pairs breed. Burrows usually extend several feet or more to keep egg and chick safe. Chicks are rarely seen, staying hidden for six weeks or so until flying off one night.
Jan 24, 2015

RT @NatGeoPhotos: "Communing with puffins makes people happy. I call it puffin therapy." 7 intimate photos of the clown-faced seabird: on.natgeo.com/1yOYcfU

Terrified Baby Impala Becomes Young Cheetahs’ First Hunting Lesson

voices.nationalgeographic.com — Professional guide and lodge owner Mikey Carr-Hartly was on safari in Kenya's Masai Mara, when he witnessed a remarkable encounter between a cheetah family and a young impala. "We were in an area of the southern Mara called Majani ya Chai, not far from Salas Camp," said Mikey.

Watch Jumbo Asteroid Zip Past Earth

news.nationalgeographic.com — Andrew Fazekas Published January 23, 2015 A mountain-size space rock will sail past Earth on Monday, offering stargazers a close look at an interplanetary pinball. Luckily, NASA says there is no risk of collision, but it will be a rare astronomically close encounter that backyard telescope owners can watch.

100 Years of National Geographic Maps: The Art and Science of Where

news-beta.nationalgeographic.com — The coordinates of the office of The Geographer of the National Geographic Society are 38° 54' 18" N, 77° 2' 12" W. You might say that Juan José Valdés, who currently holds that title, knows exactly where he stands.
Jan 26, 2015

100 Years of National Geographic Maps: The Art and Science of Where on.natgeo.com/1xUUfC8

Jan 23, 2015

100 Years of National Geographic Maps: The Art and Science of Where on.natgeo.com/1AZVxgf

Jan 23, 2015

100 Years of National Geographic Maps: The Art and Science of Where ow.ly/HPsz7 [I love maps! Who's with me?]