Most talked about New Scientist stories

#Rosettawatch: first snaps of Philae's arrival on 67P

newscientist.com — Here's what you see when you bounce off a comet. This blurry picture, the first image snapped by the European Space Agency's Philae lander after its touchdown on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November, was one of the initial warning signs that things hadn't gone as planned.

Born to dance: The animals with natural rhythm

newscientist.com — Dogs and ducks are duds on the dance floor. So how come cockatoos and sea lions can move to a beat, and what does that tell us about our own musicality? THE Remo drum company has provided kits for the Beatles, Led Zeppelin and the Rolling Stones.
Dec 18, 2014

And it's a great read MT @d_a_robson My swan song for @newscientist On dancing animals, appropriately enough newscientist.com/article/mg2243…

Dec 18, 2014

I also loved the fact that this sealion got in a strop when the Backstreet boys were played too much: newscientist.com/article/mg2243…

Dec 18, 2014

My swan song for @newscientist has finally been published! On dancing animals, appropriately enough newscientist.com/article/mg2243…

Giant robotic insect takes its first steps

newscientist.com — A robot that looks like a giant insect is taking its first steps, advancing cautiously on its crutch-like limbs. The six-legged bot, known as Hector, can move each of its legs independently, which allows it to tackle a wider range of surfaces than other similar-bodied robots that typically walk by moving three legs at a time.

#RosettaWatch: Comet lander could wake up next year

newscientist.com — Researchers at the European Space Agency are anxiously awaiting their Christmas presents: new pictures of the Philae lander snapped by the orbiting Rosetta spacecraft just a few days ago. They should reveal whether the probe can wake up next year and continue studying comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko up close.
Dec 17, 2014

Plucky comet lander #Philae may be getting enough sunlight to survive and may wake up next month RT @newscientist newscientist.com/article/dn2671…

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Fear artificial stupidity, not artificial intelligence

newscientist.com — Stephen Hawking thinks computers may surpass human intelligence and take over the world. We won't ever be silicon slaves, insists an AI expert It is not often that you are obliged to proclaim a much-loved genius wrong, but in his alarming prediction on artificial intelligence and the future of humankind, I believe Stephen Hawking has erred.
Dec 18, 2014

I, for one, am still preparing to welcome our new robot overlords ow.ly/G6kK7

Tech in a Minute: Can machines ever be intelligent?

newscientist.com — Sandrine Ceurstemont, editor, New Scientist TV Machines may be capable of impressive feats, but can they ever be truly intelligent? In this animation produced by The Open University, we follow a famous thought experiment proposed by philosopher John Searle that challenges the notion of strong AI - that a machine can ever successfully perform an intellectual task as well as a human.
Dec 18, 2014

#ExMachina is about how to distinguish between consciousness and simulation. Great vid on the Chinese Room: ow.ly/G6oro

Zoologger: Baby lobster with a taste for jellyfish surfing

newscientist.com — Species: Ibacus novemdentatus Habitat: Western Pacific and Indian Oceans What do you get when you cross a crustacean with a steamroller? The smooth fan lobster is no joke but its cartoon-flat proportions certainly make it look like a punchline.

Not again! First ever case of anxiety-induced déjà vu

newscientist.com — HAVE you read this before? A 23-year-old man from the UK almost certainly feels like he has - he's the first person to report persistent déjà vu stemming from anxiety rather than any obvious neurological disorder. Nobody knows exactly how or why déjà vu happens, but for most of us it is rare.
Dec 17, 2014

First person to report persistent déjà vu stemming from anxiety... sounds terrifying. newscientist.com/article/mg2243…

Today on New Scientist

newscientist.com — Mangrove forest planted as tsunami shield The 2004 tsunami killed 227,000 people in Indonesia. Fred Pearce visits Aceh to see the living coastal defences meant to soak up the energy of future waves Thought control makes robot arm grab and move objects By analysing brain activity linked to hand and arm movements, a team has created a robotic arm that a paralysed woman can control with her thoughts Born to dance: The animals with natural rhythm Dogs and ducks are duds on the dance floor.
Dec 17, 2014

RT @newscientist: Today on New Scientist: block rockin' beasts, evolution, asteroid soil for space farms, sexology and more ow.ly/G3HPf

Rhyme and reason: Writing poems in computer code

newscientist.com — Beyoncé's tweets as sacred text, error messages that tell a tragic tale and the looping program of a failing relationship: we parse a new literary phenomenon ON STAGE at Stanford University in California last February, the words of Beyoncé were being intoned as a religious text. Next came Richard Branson.

Is sexology just too human to study?

newscientist.com — The Institute of Sexology, Wellcome Collection , London, to September 2015 On show: in 1896, transvestism was a subject for sexologists (Image: Wellcome Library, London) Can we hope to study something as human as sex in any scientific way? A new exhibition and two books leave plenty of room for doubt SEX.

'This is our policy': New Scientist after 3000 issues

newscientist.com — A lot has changed in science, and science journalism, over the past 58 years - but our responsibilities remain the same "MAY we introduce ourselves and explain our aims? It can be done quite briefly. The New Scientist is published for all those men and women who are interested in scientific discovery and in its industrial, commercial and social consequences.
Dec 17, 2014

3000! RT@newscientist A lot has changed over 58 years. But 3000 issues later our responsibilities remain the same ow.ly/G0XLC

Dec 17, 2014

RT @newscientist: A lot has changed over 58 years. But 3000 issues later our responsibilities remain the same ow.ly/G0XLC pic.twitter.com/tRiEwpKsNg

Dec 16, 2014

RT @newscientist: A lot has changed over 58 years. But 3000 issues later our responsibilities remain the same ow.ly/G0XLC pic.twitter.com/tRiEwpKsNg

Dec 16, 2014

RT @newscientist: A lot has changed over 58 years. But 3000 issues later our responsibilities remain the same ow.ly/G0XLC pic.twitter.com/tRiEwpKsNg

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Smart shoes with lasers make strides in mobility

newscientist.com — THE right shoes can do more than complement your outfit. A new mobility aid named Path helps people who have trouble walking - simply by being fitted to their shoes. Lise Pape, an engineer at InnovationRCA at the Royal College of Art in London, was inspired to build the system by her father, who was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease more than 10 years ago.

Curiosity rover detects Martian methane burps

newscientist.com — Now you don't, now you see it. NASA's Curiosity rover has sniffed out short-lived bursts of methane on Mars, contradicting its initial methane-less reports. The find suggests that something is actively producing the gas, although it is unclear whether it is alien microbes or simply underground water interacting with rock.

Asteroid soil could fertilise farms in space

newscientist.com — Continue reading page |1| 2 We can now grow plants in microgravity - and crops grown in asteroid soil could sustain vast human populations off-planet IF YOU want to start a space farm, head for an asteroid.
Dec 16, 2014

Space farms. They're happening already. And asteroids could fertilise them for millennia ow.ly/G0Zk7 pic.twitter.com/vj2IWzreVZ

Today on New Scientist

newscientist.com — All the latest on newscientist. com: bespoke cancer drugs in a day, climate change and Christmas trees, pretty vacant graphics, mountain sculpting and more
Dec 16, 2014

RT @newscientist: Today on New Scientist: bespoke cancer drugs in a day, climate change and Christmas trees, vacant graphics and more ow.ly/FZLwe

Man vs sherry trifle: Can I eat myself drunk?

newscientist.com — What happens if you try to get mashed on potatoes and sauced on sauce? It's a sobering insight into what really happens to the booze we cook with I LOVE cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food. Ah, the old ones are the best.
Dec 18, 2014

Man vs sherry trifle: Can I eat myself drunk? 29 December 2014 - New Scientist: #eatmyselfpissed newscientist.com/article/mg2243…

Dec 16, 2014

myth: alcohol doesn't burn off when you cook. So your dinner could send you over the drink-drive limit newscientist.com/article/mg2243…

Radio-controlled mouse hints at new diabetes treatment

newscientist.com — A radio-controlled mouse might sound like a child's toy, but this version is flesh and blood and not for playing with. Genetically altered mice have shown that it is possible to regulate processes within the body remotely, opening the door to new ways of treating chronic disease.
Dec 16, 2014

RT @SciencePunk: Way cool: genetically engineered mouse releases insulin when liver cells detect radio signal: newscientist.com/article/dn2670…

Dec 16, 2014

Remote-controlled #diabetes - genetically modified mouse releases #insulin on receipt of radio signal. bit.ly/1wEKxoX

Dec 16, 2014

RT @SciencePunk: Way cool: genetically engineered mouse releases insulin when liver cells detect radio signal: newscientist.com/article/dn2670…