Most talked about New Scientist stories

New Scientist presents The Anti-Zoo

newscientist.com — 50 of the most unexpected animals known to science, from New Scientist
Nov 21, 2014

RT @valeriejamieson: the ANTI-ZOO is where to meet the creatures you won't want to cuddle. The latest collection from @newscientist newscientist.com/antizoo

Nov 21, 2014

RT @valeriejamieson: the ANTI-ZOO is where to meet the creatures you won't want to cuddle. The latest collection from @newscientist newscientist.com/antizoo

Nov 21, 2014

the ANTI-ZOO is where to meet the creatures you won't want to cuddle. The latest collection from @newscientist newscientist.com/antizoo

Workouts are no antidote to death by desk job

newscientist.com — Editorial: " Don't take life sitting down" MICHAEL JENSEN is talking to me on the phone, but his voice is drowned out by what sounds like a vacuum cleaner. Or maybe it's a lawnmower. I'm used to bad connections, but Jensen isn't using Bluetooth on a busy freeway.
Nov 22, 2014

RT @newscientist: A bout of high-intensity exercise does not cancel out the effect of sitting for hours on end. bit.ly/deathbydeskjob pic.twitter.com/wFyQmzvbQa

Watch a tapeworm squirm through a living man's brain

newscientist.com — MRI showing a tapeworm moving across a man's brain (Image: Nagui Antoun) A tapeworm that usually infects dogs, frogs and cats has made its home inside a man's brain. Sequencing its genome showed that it contains around 10 times more DNA than any other tapeworm sequenced so far, which could explain its ability to invade many different species.
Nov 21, 2014

RT @ClareWilsonMed: "Over 4 yrs the abnormality moved across his brain. Finally doctors decided to operate - pulled out a 1 cm worm." bit.ly/1uNGVlh

Nov 21, 2014

"Over 4 yrs the abnormality moved across his brain. Finally doctors decided to operate - pulled out a 1 cm worm." bit.ly/1uNGVlh

Saturn's calming nature keeps Earth friendly to life

newscientist.com — Earth's comfortable temperatures may be thanks to Saturn's good behaviour. If the ringed giant's orbit had been slightly different, Earth's orbit could have been wildly elongated, like that of a long-period comet. Our solar system is a tidy sort of place: planetary orbits here tend to be circular and lie in the same plane, unlike the highly eccentric orbits of many exoplanets.
Nov 21, 2014

It's not enough to be in the habitable zone. You need a decent orbit. We have Saturn to thank ow.ly/EFWHa pic.twitter.com/HpEsi4qoNF

Today on New Scientist

newscientist.com — Magic shoes: How to hear yourself instantly happy Perception-skewing shoes can make you feel slimmer, happier and full of energy by retuning your body's soundtrack If you would like to reuse any content from New Scientist, either in print or online, please contact the syndication department first for permission.
Nov 21, 2014

RT @newscientist: Today on New Scientist: how to hear yourself happy, tapeworm in the brain, smartwatch predicts seizures and more ow.ly/EG8KL

How to short-circuit the US power grid

newscientist.com — PREDICTING how rumours and epidemics percolate through populations, or how traffic jams spread through city streets, are network analyst Jian-Wei Wang's bread and butter. But his latest findings are likely to spark worries in the US: he's worked out how attackers could cause a cascade of network failures in the US's west-coast electricity grid - cutting power to economic powerhouses Silicon Valley and Hollywood.
Nov 21, 2014

@starsandstripes @psael As predicted in 2009. DHS were initially speechless when I told them about this research newscientist.com/article/mg2032…

Huge genome helped frog tapeworm feast on man's brain

newscientist.com — MRI showing a tapeworm moving across a man's brain (Image: Nagui Antoun) A tapeworm that usually infects dogs, frogs and cats has made its home inside a man's brain. Sequencing its genome showed that it contains around 10 times more DNA than any other tapeworm sequenced so far, which could explain its ability to invade many different species.
Nov 21, 2014

RT @newscientist: Here's a gif of a tapeworm moving around in an unfortunate man's brain pic.twitter.com/ng44P6DbhD ow.ly/EEgyB

Nov 21, 2014

Morning viewing: watch a tapeworm squirming through a man's brain zite.to/1F8G55E

Listen to the thump of Philae landing on comet 67P

newscientist.com — (Image: ESA/ATG medialab) So that's what landing on a comet sounds like. Researchers at the German Aerospace Centre have just released a short clip recorded by the European Space Agency's Philae probe as it first made contact with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko last week.

The Engineering Challenges

newscientist.com — In the first of a four-part series on the future of gas exploration in Australia, New Scientist examines the multibillion-dollar investment in a revolutionary new approach for extracting gas from isolated parts of the ocean
Nov 20, 2014

RT @newscientist: Engineers are pioneering a new way of processing gas - entirely at sea. ow.ly/EnSO4 (Sponsored by APPEA)

Today on New Scientist

newscientist.com — Us vs universe: Unfuzzying the uncertainty principle There is a loophole in Heisenberg's quantum uncertainty principle - and we're squeezing light through it to detect gravitational waves What it's like to have Parkinson's for 15 minutes A theatre company in London is using simple technology to build a first-hand experience of disabling conditions like Parkinson's If you would like to reuse any content from New Scientist, either in print or online, please contact the syndication department first for permission.
Nov 20, 2014

RT @newscientist: Today on New Scientist: 8 ways we bend the laws of physics, hackathon vs Ebola, Philae's thumpdown and more ow.ly/EC3n7

Webcam and CCTV security flaw shows us to prying eyes

newscientist.com — A networking loophole has made it easy to have a peek at what everyone else is doing by accessing cameras connected to the internet UNIVERSAL Plug and Play was never meant to be quite so universal.
Nov 20, 2014

Today's webcam scare is not entirely new news - remember the UPnP vulnerability? newscientist.com/article/mg2172…

Magic shoes: How to hear yourself instantly happy

newscientist.com — Continue reading page |1| 2 |3 Perception-skewing shoes can make you feel slimmer, happier and full of energy by retuning your body's soundtrack (Image: Andrew Lyons) AS A rule, I don't remove my shoes in public. But today I'm making an exception.
Nov 21, 2014

The shoes that trick your brain into making you feel slimmer and happier> bit.ly/1ta1bce by @CorrinneBurns +video #neuroscience

Us vs the universe: 8 ways we bend the laws of physics

newscientist.com — (Image: Dan Matutina) OK, so no one said understanding the cosmos was easy. Try as we might to understand natural phenomena, we often run smack bang into limits set by the laws of physics. Does that put us off? Not a bit of it.

Penal code: The coming world of trial by algorithm

Nov 19, 2014

RT @bldgblog: Artificially intelligent urban infrastructure, ubiquitous surveillance, and the coming age of "trial by algorithm": bit.ly/1zDBRzR

What it's like to have Parkinson's for 15 minutes

newscientist.com — I'm at a close friend's wedding, waiting to give a speech. Public speaking always makes me anxious, but today it's worse than usual: my hand is shaking noticeably and I can't seem to make it stop. The loss of control is unnerving.

Today on New Scientist

newscientist.com — Plastic pads let you climb walls like Spider-Man Using a new adhesive, climbers can now shimmy up walls gecko-style.
Nov 19, 2014

RT @newscientist: Today on New Scientist: why it's simpler to be 2 things at once, mystery Russian spacecraft, weed evolution and more ow.ly/ExViy

Contact lenses with built-in video could be 3D printed

newscientist.com — Who needs Glass when you've got contact lenses that can display video and even detect health problems? What's more, lenses with these capabilities could one day be created using a 3D printer. Most of today's 3D printers work with scraps of plastic or metal and turn them into simple objects.
Nov 21, 2014

RT @PeterGuber: RT @mediaredef Forget Glass: Contact lenses with built-in video could be 3D printed (@PaulMarks12 - @newscientist) redef.it/b5gw