Most talked about New Scientist stories

And now the weather, featuring climate change blame

newscientist.com — Continue reading page |1| 2 A new technique connecting individual weather events with the impact of greenhouse gas emissions could bring climate change into everyday weather reports "Well, the record-breakingly hot summer is showing no sign of cooling down. No thanks to us: the heatwave was made 35 per cent more likely by human greenhouse gas emissions."
Aug 28, 2014

RT @newscientist: "This heatwave was 35% us": Weather forecasts will have climate change blame - built in ow.ly/AOZHx pic.twitter.com/pL5awwwl2i

Your death microbiome could catch your killer

newscientist.com — MILLIONS want you dead. No, it's not a Twitter conspiracy, but a battle raging beneath your skin. The cells in your body are outnumbered 10 to one by microbial cells, and like it or not, eventually the microbes will win. Surprisingly, what happens next has largely been a mystery.
Aug 28, 2014

Finally...the #microbiome we've all been waiting for...the microbiome of DEATH bit.ly/1tGHBas

Fish reared on land replay the transition to four legs

newscientist.com — It was one of the key events in the evolution of animals - and now it has been replayed in the lab. Evolutionary biologists reared air-breathing fish on land for eight months and found that the experience encouraged the fish to develop skeletons better adapted for walking.

Swap bad memories for good at the flick of a switch

newscientist.com — Memory is a fickle beast. A bad experience can turn a once-loved coffee shop or holiday destination into a place to be avoided. Now experiments in mice have shown how such associations can be reversed. When forming a memory of a place, the details of the location and the associated emotions are encoded in different regions of the brain.

Sliding stones of Death Valley: Rocky riddle resolved

newscientist.com — I DIDN'T imagine it would be like this. A breath of wind, a crack and then it happened. After seven years of sleuthing, the mystery I'd been pursuing resolved itself instantly before my eyes. Exalted, I rushed down to the edge of the lake bed to watch more closely - slowly but surely, the rocks were moving and now I knew why (see graphic).
Aug 27, 2014

Death Valley's sliding stone mystery solved by Ralph Lorenz ow.ly/AMIL6

Aug 27, 2014

Sliding stones of Death Valley: Rocky riddle resolved - plus video newscientist.com/article/mg2232…

Aug 27, 2014

Sliding stones of Death Valley: Rocky riddle resolved - environment - 27 August 2014 - New Scientist: newscientist.com/article/mg2232…

Show 1 more tweet from Valerie Jamieson

Three ways the iceman controls his immune system

newscientist.com — The way of the iceman (Image: AP/Press Association) We can learn to consciously control our immune system - that's the surprising finding from research based on the techniques of the "iceman" Wim Hof, famous for his ability to withstand cold for long periods.

Five sites shortlisted for Rosetta's comet landing

newscientist.com — We're there, now where do we put the spacecraft? The European Space Agency's Rosetta probe has been scanning comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for sites where its Philae lander could touch down in November. The shortlist is now down to five. "I think in the end everyone was happy," says Philae manager Stephan Ulamec.
Aug 26, 2014

Finding a parking spot can be hard. Five possible parks for Rosetta comet probe: ow.ly/AK1Pf pic.twitter.com/mxoz4CTVLZ

Aug 26, 2014

RT @newscientist: We're here, now where to park? Landing sites for Rosetta comet probe announced ow.ly/AK1Pf pic.twitter.com/LZj1JuVmKF

Aug 26, 2014

RT @newscientist: We're here, now where to park? Landing sites for Rosetta comet probe announced ow.ly/AK1Pf pic.twitter.com/LZj1JuVmKF