Most talked about The New Yorker stories

Madison Bumgarner, The Best

newyorker.com — I missed Christy Mathewson somehow but caught almost everyone else, down the years-Lefty Grove, Carl Hubbell, Sandy Koufax, Bob Gibson, Jack Morris, Curt Schilling, Randy Johnson-but here was the best.
Oct 30, 2014

"watching Bumgarner is like feeling an expertly administered epidural nip in between a couple of vertebrae" newyorker.com/news/sporting-…

Oct 30, 2014

Can it get any sweeter for a #SFGiants fan than having Roger Angell's exquisite coda to Game 7? newyorker.com/news/sporting-… via @newyorker

Oct 30, 2014

Roger Angell, a New Yorker contributor since 1944, still writes with such elegant effortlessness: newyorker.com/news/sporting-…

Oct 30, 2014

I love Roger Angell more than I love Madison Bumgarner, but only a little bit more: newyorker.com/news/sporting-… via @newyorker

Oct 30, 2014

RT @MySecondEmpire: "Roger Angell, a senior editor and a staff writer, has contributed to The New Yorker since 1944." Think about that. newyorker.com/news/sporting-…

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Could Mexico’s Missing Students Spark a Revolution?

newyorker.com — Read Francisco Goldman's first report from Mexico. On Sunday morning, a heartbreaking headline appeared on the news Web site SinEmbargo, which is based here in Mexico City: "I Know My Son Is Alive and That He Will Be a Teacher."
Oct 30, 2014

RT @NewYorker: Crisis in Mexico: Could Forty-Three Missing Students Spark a Revolution? nyr.kr/1G0GpVe

Oct 30, 2014

Good briefing by @PacoGoldman on the current crisis in Mexico --> Could 43 missing students spark a revolution? nyr.kr/1065EES

Oct 30, 2014

Could 43 missing students spark a revolution? Read Francisco Goldman on Mexico. #Longreads ow.ly/DB9Z1

The Empty Elections of 2014

newyorker.com — At this late stage in the prostitution, cretinization, and putrefaction of the American political system, it's hard to get worked up about anything, and that, doubtless, explains why most voters aren't paying much attention to the midterm elections. Or, rather, they are trying to pay no attention.
Oct 30, 2014

On the prostitution, cretinization and putrefaction of the 2014 election: newyorker.com/news/john-cass… via @newyorker

Oct 30, 2014

RT @EliStokols: "Pity, for example, the unfortunate citizens of Colorado..." Good @JohnCassidy on 2014's empty elections nyr.kr/1yKjvNg #COpolitics

Oct 30, 2014

Great piece, gets past the political horse-race blah-blah: RT @NewYorker: @JohnCassidy: The Empty Elections Of 2014 nyr.kr/1ua9vi1

Oct 30, 2014

"Pity, for example, the unfortunate citizens of Colorado..." Good @JohnCassidy on 2014's empty elections nyr.kr/1yKjvNg #COpolitics

Tim Cook and the End of Gay Rights as a Wedge Issue

newyorker.com — On Thursday morning, the head of one of the world's most admired companies, Tim Cook, of Apple, announced that he is gay. Although not entirely a surprise, Cook had guarded his privacy.

McDonald’s Versus the Haters

newyorker.com — In "Modern Meat," an examination of America's high-tech animal-production system, published in 1984, the journalist and hog farmer Orville Schell admitted that he felt silly, when ordering pork in a restaurant, asking about the life of the pig. "How many restaurant managers are besieged by customers worried about how the meat they are eating is raised?"
Oct 30, 2014

Crap -- and lots of it RT"@JeffreyLAT: A profound question for our fatty times, what's in a #BigMac? newyorker.com/culture/cultur… via @newyorker"

Oct 30, 2014

A profound question for our fatty times, what's in a #BigMac? newyorker.com/culture/cultur… via @newyorker

Is the Field of Psychology Biased Against Conservatives?

newyorker.com — On January 27, 2011, from a stage in the middle of the San Antonio Convention Center, Jonathan Haidt addressed the participants of the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. The topic was an ambitious one: a vision for social psychology in the year 2020.
Oct 30, 2014

Social psychologists' political orientation: 90% socially liberal; 82% fiscally liberal/moderate. @jonhaidt supported newyorker.com/science/maria-…

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Billionaires to Retain Control of Government

newyorker.com — WASHINGTON ( The Borowitz Report )-With just one week to go until the midterm elections, a new poll indicates that billionaires are likely to retain control of the United States government. The poll, conducted by the University of Minnesota's Opinion Research Institute, shows that the proxy candidates of billionaires are likely to win ninety-eight per cent of next Tuesday's races, with the remaining two per cent leaning billionaire.
Oct 30, 2014

RT @MarkLeibovich: $igh // Midterms Prediction: Billionaires to Retain Control of Government newyorker.com/humor/borowitz… via @newyorker

Oct 30, 2014

$igh // Midterms Prediction: Billionaires to Retain Control of Government newyorker.com/humor/borowitz… via @newyorker

Oct 30, 2014

RT @NewYorker: .@BorowitzReport: A poll shows that the proxy candidates of billionaires are likely to win 98% of next week’s races nyr.kr/1pUpKsd

Oct 30, 2014

RT @ritholtz: Midterms Prediction: Billionaires to Retain Control of Government newyorker.com/humor/borowitz… via @newyorker

Good News in a Very Bad Year

newyorker.com — The year 2014 has been what people of previous empires-the British by way of the Romans-called an annus horribilis. The list of horrors spans the globe.
Oct 30, 2014

RT @NewYorker: “Horror is more attention-grabbing than heroism.” George Packer on good news in a bad year: nyr.kr/1vk8uym pic.twitter.com/MfPRAb35Gj

Oct 30, 2014

RT @atotalmonet: "It’s always tempting to believe that things have never been worse than they are now—and it’s never true." newyorker.com/news/daily-com…

Oct 30, 2014

RT @tnynewsdesk: "It’s always tempting to believe that things have never been worse than they are now—and it’s never true." newyorker.com/news/daily-com…

Oct 30, 2014

"It’s always tempting to believe that things have never been worse than they are now—and it’s never true." newyorker.com/news/daily-com…

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The World Series is Almost Over

newyorker.com — O.K., a blowout, but who knew? Every year along about this time, friends start asking me, "Who's going to win tonight? Whadda you think?" But of course I have no clue. Baseball's absolute unpredictability makes amateurs of us all, and after the Royals' wholly unexpected 10-0 shellacking of the Giants in last night's Game Six we can all get ready for the finale tonight with cheerful idiocy.
Oct 30, 2014

The great Roger Angell called it well before the game, but was polite enough to pretend not to newyorker.com/news/sporting-…

Oct 29, 2014

For the record, Roger Angell called it: "unless the Royals score..." (Panik took care of that), "that little edge..." newyorker.com/news/sporting-…

Oct 29, 2014

Roger Angell: "Baseball's absolute unpredictability makes amateurs of us all." So true; great piece newyorker.com/news/sporting-… via @newyorker

Oct 29, 2014

RT @NewYorker: “Baseball’s absolute unpredictability makes amateurs of us all.” Roger Angell on the #WorldSeries: nyr.kr/1pZ7D4y

Oct 29, 2014

RT @NewYorker: “Baseball’s absolute unpredictability makes amateurs of us all.” Roger Angell on the #WorldSeries: nyr.kr/1pZ7D4y

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Obama Urged to Apologize for Anti-Fear Remark

newyorker.com — WASHINGTON ( The Borowitz Report)-President Obama is coming under increasing pressure to apologize for a controversial remark that he made on Tuesday, in which he said that the nation's Ebola policy should be based on facts rather than fear.

Killer Sorority Meeting!

newyorker.com — Welcome, new sorority sisters! As your chapter president, I called this meeting after hearing that you're nervous about sleeping in the house for the first time. A little birdie told me that you're afraid sorority houses attract serial killers and other psychopathic predators. But, ladies, that's just a myth perpetuated by movies and television!

The Sporting Scene: The New Yorker

newyorker.com — Dispatches on football, baseball, basketball, hockey, boxing, and more.

How Haley Joel Osment Survived Being a Child Star

newyorker.com — When he was four years old, Haley Joel Osment had his picture taken by a stranger as he and his mother walked through the front doors of IKEA. A few days later, his mother took a call from an advertising agency, which was offering her son the chance to audition for a role in a Pizza Hut television commercial.
Oct 30, 2014

RT @NewYorker: Haley Joel Osment discusses how he survived being a child star: nyr.kr/1FYZ83v

Oct 30, 2014

RT @NewYorker: Haley Joel Osment discusses how he survived being a child star: nyr.kr/1FYZ83v

Oct 30, 2014

Breathing, eating. RT @NewYorker: Haley Joel Osment discusses how he survived being a child star: nyr.kr/1FYZ83v

Oct 30, 2014

“It’s a blessing to do any work.” An interview with a grown-up Haley Joel Osment. newyorker.com/culture/cultur…

Rome, Open City - The New Yorker

newyorker.com — Handheld cameras tremble with the urgency of open wounds and violent emotion in Roberto Rossellini's 1945 drama of the Italian resistance to the capital's occupation by Nazi Germany. It's a tale of two women: Pina (Anna Magnani), a widowed mother who is pregnant with the child of a resistance fighter whom she is about to marry, and Marina (Maria Michi), a night-club performer in love with another leading resister and longtime anti-Fascist.
Oct 30, 2014

RT @andrewpatner: Chicagoans: Not 2 be missed @FilmCenter Oct 31-Nov 6 restored "Rome, Open City" (1945) @tnyfrontrow writes @NewYorker newyorker.com/goings-on-abou…

Medical Meals

newyorker.com — I knew a wonderful surgeon who packed his own lunches: a bowl of instant ramen, a jar of salsa, and a package of pre-shredded Cheddar cheese. After mixing and microwaving these components, he'd enjoy his meal with a can of diet soda. But not everyone has the time or the disposition to bring in food.

The Smell of Death

newyorker.com — By day, Lillian Egner works as a program manager for the Soap Factory, an experimental art space in downtown Minneapolis. A typical week for Mike McGinley, who works at St. Croix Sensory, his family's business, involves odor-testing kitty litter and training environmental-protection officers in the correct use of the Nasal Ranger, a nose-mounted, megaphone-shaped "field olfactometer" invented by his father to measure smell.
Oct 30, 2014

Great, icky post by @nicolatwilley on how to smell-design a haunted house. "The Smell of Death," The New Yorker ow.ly/DAxsR

The Collapse - The New Yorker

newyorker.com — On an April morning in Manhattan last year, Steven Davis, the former chairman of the law firm of Dewey & LeBoeuf, reached for his ringing cell phone. He was sitting in the back seat of a taxi, on the way downtown to renew his passport.

In the Same Space: Eirini and Andreas Vourloumis

newyorker.com — As a child in Greece, the photographer Eirini Vourloumis was very close to her grandfather, Andreas Vourloumis, a figurative painter who was part of the group of significant Greek artists known collectively as the Thirties Generation. Vourloumis, now thirty-five, said that her grandfather helped to raise her and showed her "how to look at things" as an artist.
Oct 30, 2014

Moving, beautiful dialogue between a painter grandfather & a photographer granddaughter newyorker.com/culture/photo-… @NewYorker @EiriniVourloumi

Fishy Freedom - The New Yorker

newyorker.com — On a recent Wednesday that felt like the first of winter, about a hundred and fifty children-mostly under seven-and their parents gathered at Pier 40, over at West Street and Houston. Their mission: to thank for their service the numerous small riverine creatures that have whispered their secrets to the kids since last spring, and liberate them.