Most talked about The New Yorker stories

The Holly and the I.V.

newyorker.com — At some point between Thanksgiving and Christmas, after the leftover turkey is gone but before the mail-order fruitcake arrives, many Americans engage in the annual ritual of putting up decorations. There is no data set on when most people embark on this task, but an existing record-the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System ( NEISS), a U.S.
Dec 22, 2014

(Artificial trees, which occupy their own category, account for one in ten injuries.) newyorker.com/tech/elements/… ht @AaronLucchetti

Dec 22, 2014

15% involve chairs or ladders MT @NewYorker: Christmas decorations send 15,000 to US emergency rooms every year nyr.kr/1AzYjvR

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Favorite Books of 2014

newyorker.com — For me, the great discovery of 2014 was the work of Elizabeth Harrower, an eighty-six-year-old Australian novelist who lives quietly in Sydney, and who has not published a novel since the nineteen-sixties.
Dec 22, 2014

RT @mmechomski: the great discovery of 2014 was the work of Elizabeth Harrower, an 86 yr old Australian writer ~James Wood @colvinius newyorker.com/books/page-tur…

Dec 22, 2014

“Women never become art monsters..Nabokov didn’t even fold his umbrella. Vera licked his stamps for him.”Jenny Offill nyr.kr/1xFD2kR

Dec 22, 2014

“We never understand how little time there is. This is what you want to say to people—that there’s no time for lies.” nyr.kr/1xFD2kR

Dec 22, 2014

"I can’t recommend this brilliant, austere writer strongly enough;… like…a long lost sister of Muriel Spark’s." j.mp/1CoWowa

Dec 22, 2014

@nxthompson & DAMN, what a great review to open it. Extra pts 4 hiliting an improbable & overlooked book. j.mp/1CoWowa

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Children’s Holiday Letters to Satan

newyorker.com — Each year, due mostly to minor misspellings and very poor penmanship, hundreds of children's letters are sent to Satan, Dark Lord of the Underworld. Always in the market for the souls of innocents, Satan will often take the time to respond. Dear Satan, What I really want this year more than anything is a Barbie Dream House.

We Can Handle the Truth

newyorker.com — Of the many loud and shouty movie scenes to air our nation's moral laundry, possibly the loudest and the shoutiest comes in "A Few Good Men," when Jack Nicholson, playing the wolf-eyed Colonel Jessup, talks about the underside of uniformed defense. Jessup has been called in to testify in court-martial proceedings.

Comment - The New Yorker

newyorker.com — To perceive Christmas through its wrapping becomes more difficult with every year. There was a little device we noticed in one of the sporting-goods stores-a trumpet that hunters hold to their ears so that they can hear the distant music of the hounds.

Ladylike: Julia Gillard’s Misogyny Speech

newyorker.com — Australians living in the United States are accustomed to their American friends passing along "news" from back home about dingoes and crocodiles. Australia's a long way away, after all. But this morning, something weirdly substantial made the rounds: a fifteen-minute clip of Australian parliamentary proceedings in which Australia's first woman Prime Minister, Julia Gillard, calls the leader of the opposition, Tony Abbott, a misogynist, and does so with genuine anger.

Liz and Lindsay - The New Yorker

newyorker.com — It's worth paying attention to whatever movie Lindsay Lohan is in. Her personal problems, even in their facile abstraction to tabloid fodder, have been terribly sad to contemplate; they would be so were she talentless and unheralded, but they're all the sadder for their derailment of-and substitute for-her work onscreen.

A Visit from Saint Nicholas (in the Ernest Hemingway Manner)

newyorker.com — It was the night before Christmas. The house was very quiet. No creatures were stirring in the house. There weren't even any mice stirring. The stockings had been hung carefully by the chimney. The children hoped that Saint Nicholas would come and fill them. The children were in their beds.
Dec 22, 2014

A Visit from Saint Nicholas (in the Ernest Hemingway Manner) dlvr.it/7vLDbB

The Cartoon Lounge: Bugged

video.newyorker.com — Bob Mankoff, The New Yorker's cartoon editor, has a cold. This week, he pulls out some illness-themed cartoons and answers the question, "Why are cartoons listed as drawings in the magazine's table of contents?" Watch on newyorker.com!
Dec 22, 2014

RT @NewYorkerVideo: Our cartoon editor has a cold. In his office, with sick-themed cartoons and tissues and the sniffles and all: video.newyorker.com/watch/the-cart…

Out of the West - The New Yorker

newyorker.com — On a beautiful day in Wyoming, in 1880, three men gather on a slight rise behind some rocks, ready to do a bit of killing. Two of them-William Munny (Clint Eastwood) and Ned Logan (Morgan Freeman)-are retired professional assassins, disgusted with their past but broke and therefore willing to shoot a couple of cowhands, unknown to either of them, for cash.

The Merchant - The New Yorker

newyorker.com — "Can I have your attention, please? Can I have your attention, please?" A dozen or so times a day at J. Crew headquarters, in Manhattan, a voice comes over the intercom with a low-fidelity reverb that brings to mind a muezzin's call to prayer.
Dec 22, 2014

@VictoriaPeckham Probably not, no. But it RULES the US high streets. Drexler's a retail genius - NYer profile: newyorker.com/magazine/2010/…

An Ambush, the Police, and a Tragedy in Brooklyn

newyorker.com — At ten o'clock on Saturday night, everything was calm at the intersection of Park and Tompkins Avenues, in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn-one block north of where, seven hours earlier, a man named Ismaaiyl Brinsley allegedly killed two New York City police officers in an ambush. There were bright lights, rows of patrol cars, and few pedestrians.
Dec 22, 2014

Low level writing Nyer has shrunk yo n Ambush and a Tragedy in Brooklyn newyorker.com/news/news-desk… via @newyorker

Dec 21, 2014

RT @NewYorker: RT @nxthompson: “You just do your job--and hope you go home at the end of the day.” An officer in Bed-Stuy last night nyr.kr/1AUgFp9

Dec 21, 2014

RT @nxthompson: Officers on the scene last night: calm and dignified. SBA and Pataki on Twitter: anything but. nyr.kr/1HklqdU

Dec 21, 2014

RT @nxthompson: Officers on the scene last night: calm and dignified. SBA and Pataki on Twitter: anything but. nyr.kr/1HklqdU

Dec 21, 2014

RT @nxthompson: Officers on the scene last night: calm and dignified. SBA and Pataki on Twitter: anything but. nyr.kr/1HklqdU

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“Selma” and “American Sniper” Reviews

newyorker.com — At the beginning of Ava DuVernay's extraordinary "Selma," we hear Martin Luther King, Jr. (David Oyelowo), indulging a private joke with Coretta Scott King (Carmen Ejogo), about how, long ago, they were going to settle down in a small university town and lead a simple life as a preacher and his wife.
Dec 22, 2014

RT @starfishncoffee: Another great SELMA review RT @NewYorker: David Denby reviews “Selma” and “American Sniper” nyr.kr/13c5I76

A Copy Editor’s Twelve Days of Christmas

newyorker.com — On the first day of Christmas my true love gave to me a Webster's and O.E.D. On the second day of Christmas my true love gave to me two Magic Rubs and a Webster's and O.E.D. On the third day of Christmas my true love gave to me three Black Wings, two Magic Rubs, and a Webster's and O.E.D.

There Is No “Genius of the System”

newyorker.com — Nostalgia for the great old Hollywood studios makes us forget that movies are wilder, more daring, and more original than ever.
Dec 21, 2014

Richard Brody’s zoomed-out look at the sky-is-falling thinking re: Hollywood franchises. Essential, essential reading newyorker.com/culture/richar…

Dec 21, 2014

RT @tnyfrontrow: Against nostalgia for the midrange drama & the so-called studio era, which gets in the way of seeing greatness today: http…

Dec 21, 2014

Against nostalgia for the midrange drama & the so-called studio era, which gets in the way of seeing greatness today: newyorker.com/culture/richar…

Gates Spends Entire First Day Back in Office Trying to Install Windows 8.1

newyorker.com — REDMOND, WASHINGTON (The Borowitz Report)-Bill Gates's first day at work in the newly created role of technology adviser got off to a rocky start yesterday as the Microsoft founder struggled for hours to install the Windows 8.1 upgrade.
Dec 21, 2014

Gates Spends Entire First Day Back in Office Trying to Install Windows 8.1 newyorker.com/humor/borowitz… via @newyorker

Four Charts That Defined the World in 2014

newyorker.com — Many of the economic trends that have defined countries' fortunes over the past year are especially striking when seen visually-how in the U.S., for example, unemployment declined, or how, in Russia, the ruble plummeted. Here are four charts that reveal trends with particularly far-reaching implications for the global economy as a whole: 1.

The Walking Alive

newyorker.com — I am writing this while walking on a treadmill. And now you know the biggest problem with working at a treadmill desk: the compulsion to announce constantly that you are working at a treadmill desk.

Talking Turkey - The New Yorker

newyorker.com — "Not for vegetarians" alert. Howard Hawks's 1941 drama "Sergeant York," a thematically focussed bio-pic starring Gary Cooper as Alvin York, a Tennessee backwoods pacifist (at least as far as humans are concerned) and ace marksman who overcame his religious convictions and became a hero of the First World War, features some notable scenes of York's prowess with a rifle-and the wiles he employs to demonstrate it.
Dec 21, 2014

@JoeLeydon @Lexialex Sergeant York was a target of those hearings; here's a post with a few quotes and links: newyorker.com/culture/richar…