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Most Talked About NPR Stories

Book News: Happiness Study Says Library Trips Are As Good As A Pay Raise

npr.org — The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly. Going to the library gives people the same kick as getting a raise does - a £1,359 ($ 2,282) raise, to be exact - according to a study commissioned by the U.K.'s Department for Culture, Media & Sport.
UK "happiness study" finds a trip to the library feels as good as getting a raise: n.pr/1lICbWA
Via @nprnews: Book News: Happiness Study Says Library Trips Are As Good As A Pay Raise n.pr/1lICbWA
RT @nprnews: Book News: Study Says Library Trips Can Make You Happy As A Pay Raise n.pr/1k8ObRI
RT @nprnews: Book News: Study Says Library Trips Can Make You Happy As A Pay Raise n.pr/1k8ObRI

U.N. Blames Rebel Forces For South Sudan Massacre

npr.org — Hundreds of civilians were massacred in the South Sudanese town of Bentiu this week. Bodies littered the streets, and were piled high in churches and mosques where the victims had sought shelter. For more, Steve Inskeep talks to Andrew Green, the South Sudan bureau chief for the Voice of America.
I talked to @NPRinskeep this morning about Bentiu massacre and ongoing fighting in #SouthSudan: npr.org/2014/04/24/306…
RT @MorningEdition: In a state called Unity, forces in South Sudan are accused of massacring civilians. Latest from @_andrew_green n.pr/1lIiZsh

CIA Is Quietly Ramping Up Aid To Syrian Rebels, Sources Say

npr.org — The U.S. is providing more arms and training to the moderate rebels in Syria, under a growing secret program run by the CIA in Jordan. Sources tell NPR that secret program could be supplemented by a more public effort in the coming months involving American military trainers.
RT @Max_Fisher: Feels like we’ve heard this before RT @Katulis: CIA quietly ramping up aid to Syria's rebels, per multiple sources bit.ly/1iaGStu
Feels like we’ve heard this before RT @Katulis: CIA quietly ramping up aid to Syria's rebels, per multiple sources bit.ly/1iaGStu
RT @Katulis: CIA quietly ramping up aid to Syria's rebels, according to multiple sources n.pr/Pu5FN9
US covertly "providing more arms & training" to Syria rebels via CIA program based in Jordan, NPR reports: npr.org/blogs/parallel…
Show 1 more tweet from Laura Rozen

New Yorkers Protest Long Shadows Cast By New Skyscrapers

npr.org — Skyscrapers are a hallmark of large cities. Modern engineering makes it possible to erect something as tall as the Empire State Building on a very small footprint. Although developers love them, in New York - the city of skyscrapers - residents have been upset at the shadows these buildings cast over public spaces like Central Park.
"New Yorkers Protest Long Shadows Cast By New Skyscrapers" npr.org/2014/04/23/305… I'm gonna file this one in the "a little late" folder
Here is my latest piece on the shadows from super towers that are falling on Central Park. npr.org/2014/04/23/305…
New Yorkers Protest Long Shadows Cast By New Skyscrapers n.pr/1hhIhcw
Between the New Yorker and this report from NPR, I'm eyerolling so hard I'm going to tip over backward. npr.org/2014/04/23/305…
Show 2 more tweets from Timothy Stenovec, Jeff MacGregor

The FDA Moves To Regulate Increasingly Popular E-Cigarettes

npr.org — The Food and Drug Administration says it will formally propose regulating e-cigarettes. Early Thursday, the agency unveiled a long-awaited rule that would give it power to oversee the increasingly popular devices, much in the way that it regulates traditional cigarettes.
Via @nprnews: FDA Moves To Regulate Increasingly Popular E-Cigarettes n.pr/Pu0tc6
Good morning. And, yes. Via @nprnews: The FDA Moves To Regulate Increasingly Popular E-Cigarettes n.pr/Pu0tc6
The Food and Drug Administration announces plans to regulate e-cigarettes for the first time. ow.ly/w6ZsM
RT @nprnews: The FDA Moves To Regulate Increasingly Popular E-Cigarettes n.pr/1hmfXu4

DEP says residents not exposed to harmful air pollution during Chevron well fire

stateimpact.npr.org — Nearby residents and emergency crews that responded to a February explosion at a natural gas well site in southwest Pennsylvania were not exposed to harmful air pollution, according to the state Department of Environmental Protection.
DEP says residents not exposed to harmful air pollution during Chevron well fire n.pr/QFG7gV via @KatieColaneri

Georgia Law OKs Guns In Schools, Churches

npr.org — Georgians will now be able to carry firearms in such places as schools, bars, churches and government buildings under a sweeping new law signed by the governor on Wednesday. The Safe Carry Protection Act, also known to critics as the "Guns Everywhere Bill," was signed by Gov.
"The Guns Everywhere Law" In Georgia, people can carry guns in schools, bars, churches, govt buildings under new law. npr.org/blogs/thetwo-w…

Why Are We Spiteful, Even Though It Bites Us Back?

npr.org — Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures USA Maybe you turn up your music when your neighbor complains about the noise. Or maybe you curse a baby princess because you didn't get invited to her christening, as in "Sleeping Beauty" and its latest incarnation, the upcoming movie "Maleficent."
On spite: Why do people willingly inconvenience or even harm themselves in order to harm others? n.pr/Pudr9V @nprnews

Jobless Claims Bounce Up From Earlier Weeks' Low Levels

npr.org — Ted Jackson /The Times-Picayune/Landov After two straight weeks in which the figures tracked near their lowest levels in seven years, the number of first-time applications for jobless benefits rose more than expected last week. The Employment and Training Administration says there were 329,000 such claims filed, up by 24,000 from the previous week's slightly revised figure.
Via @nprnews: Jobless Claims Bounce Up From Earlier Weeks' Low Levels n.pr/1lISxif

When Money Trumps Need In College Admissions

npr.org — At some schools, the admissions process itself can work against low-income students, according to Georgia Nugent, former president of Kenyon College and a senior fellow at the Council of Independent Colleges. Nugent says during her tenure at Kenyon, there were low-income students at the bottom of the admissions list who sometimes weren't accepted so the school could make room for more affluent students.
Credit where due: @npr college affordability coverage has been very good. Woke up to this today. ow.ly/w79p1

Teen Chinese Golfer Getting Used To Attention

npr.org — SHENZHEN, China (AP) - One year after his stunning debut at the Masters, Chinese 15-year-old golfer Guan Tianlang is growing accustomed to being in the spotlight. Guan looked composed and confident as he shot a 1-under 71 in the first round of the China Open on Thursday in front of a gallery that grew to more than 100 spectators midway through the front nine.
@NPRnews Teen Chinese Golfer Getting Used To Attention - Teen Chinese golfer getting used to attention ow.ly/2FZaXd

Stowaway Teen's Father Was Shocked To Hear Son Was In Hawaii

npr.org — The father of a teen who last weekend survived a 5 1/2 flight from California to Hawaii in the wheel well of a passenger jet says that: "When I watched the analysis about the extraordinary and dangerous trip of my son on local TVs and that Allah had saved him, I thanked God and I was very happy."
Via @nprnews: Stowaway Teen's Father Was Shocked To Hear Son Was In Hawaii n.pr/1lIGGjW

With Aereo Before Supreme Court, Cloud Computing Is Up In The Air

npr.org — The Supreme Court is considering the legality of Aereo, an internet service that allows users to stream and record live television. Some fear a broad ruling against the company could have major implications for cloud computing. Zachary Seward, senior editor of the website Quartz, explains more.
Went on @npratc to discuss the Aereo case and its implications for the cloud n.pr/RObKWN

In Age Of Custom-Tailored Ed Tech, Teachers Shop Off The Rack

npr.org — Sorry! We can't seem to find the page you were looking for. Please visit the NPR Help Center to report this page as missing, or use the links below to continue your search. It's a shame that your page is lost, but at least it's in good company; stick around to browse through NPR stories about lost people, places and things that still haven't turned up.
if you read between the lines, teachers not so happy w/ ed-tech: npr.org/2014/04/23/306…

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