Most talked about Popular Science stories

The 100 Greatest Innovations Of The Year

popsci.com — Each year, Popular Science picks the 100 greatest new innovations in technology to feature in our Best Of What's New issue. Discover the most exciting developments in consumer gadgets, sustainability, medicine, automobiles and more. Follow links in the captions to our special Best Of What's New website for in-depth analysis, Q&As, and our Grand Prize winners.
Nov 23, 2014

The 100 Greatest Innovations of the he Year from Popular Science magazine popsci.com/popular-scienc…

NASA's (Un)Censored Moonwalkers

popsci.com — A big part of going to the Moon was selling the program to the public. Not only was it important for NASA to gain support for the Apollo program, the agency stood to gain nothing by misrepresenting its missions to the taxpayers who were footing the bill.
Nov 23, 2014

RT @PopSci: Part of NASA's initial marketing strategy was transparency, including public release of unedited mission transcripts pops.ci/CNkWp2

Nov 21, 2014

NASA's (Un)Censored Moonwalkers. Public affairs ensured the public would read every word spoken on the Moon. pops.ci/w4yNc9

Ask Us Anything: Which Came First, The Chicken Or The Egg?

popsci.com — Welcome to our newest video series, called Ask Us Anything! And we really mean it. In each video, we'll answer the odd-ball, amusing, or just plain confounding questions you have about the world around you. We drew inspiration from the monthly column from the magazine, which is written by Daniel Engber (you can find those gems here).
Nov 21, 2014

Which came first, the chicken or the egg? @popsci's answer, animated: ow.ly/EGljI Now go ahead, #AskUsAnything

Worm Living In Human Brain Gets Its Genome Mapped

popsci.com — For many years, a Chinese man in the U.K. experienced a range of debilitating neurological symptoms with no understood origin--including headaches, memory loss, and seizures.
Nov 21, 2014

And removed, thankfully: Worm Living In Human Brain Gets Its Genome Mapped pops.ci/LVvuvH via @PopSci

Nov 21, 2014

RT @PopSci: A man had a worm living in his brain for 4 years. He recovered, and the worm was donated to science. Shudder. popsci.com/rare-brain-dwe…

Scientists Make Gecko-Inspired Wall Climbing Adhesive

popsci.com — Geckos, when not shilling for insurance companies, are most known for their climbing abilities that let them scale walls effortlessly. Thanks to their biology, geckos have one major advantages over humans who want to move vertically: they are small, and their bodies are light, so their natural adhesive just has to be good, not great.
Nov 21, 2014

It was only a matter of time. Researchers create adhesive pads that turn human hands into gecko toes: ow.ly/EGRPD