Most talked about Popular Science stories

Ask Us Anything: Which Came First, The Chicken Or The Egg?

popsci.com — Welcome to our newest video series, called Ask Us Anything! And we really mean it. In each video, we'll answer the odd-ball, amusing, or just plain confounding questions you have about the world around you. We drew inspiration from the monthly column from the magazine, which is written by Daniel Engber (you can find those gems here).
Nov 21, 2014

Which came first, the chicken or the egg? @popsci's answer, animated: ow.ly/EGljI Now go ahead, #AskUsAnything

Worm Living In Human Brain Gets Its Genome Mapped

popsci.com — For many years, a Chinese man in the U.K. experienced a range of debilitating neurological symptoms with no understood origin--including headaches, memory loss, and seizures.
Nov 21, 2014

And removed, thankfully: Worm Living In Human Brain Gets Its Genome Mapped pops.ci/LVvuvH via @PopSci

Nov 21, 2014

RT @PopSci: A man had a worm living in his brain for 4 years. He recovered, and the worm was donated to science. Shudder. popsci.com/rare-brain-dwe…

NASA's (Un)Censored Moonwalkers

popsci.com — A big part of going to the Moon was selling the program to the public. Not only was it important for NASA to gain support for the Apollo program, the agency stood to gain nothing by misrepresenting its missions to the taxpayers who were footing the bill.
Nov 21, 2014

NASA's (Un)Censored Moonwalkers. Public affairs ensured the public would read every word spoken on the Moon. pops.ci/w4yNc9

Scientists Make Gecko-Inspired Wall Climbing Adhesive

popsci.com — Geckos, when not shilling for insurance companies, are most known for their climbing abilities that let them scale walls effortlessly. Thanks to their biology, geckos have one major advantages over humans who want to move vertically: they are small, and their bodies are light, so their natural adhesive just has to be good, not great.
Nov 21, 2014

It was only a matter of time. Researchers create adhesive pads that turn human hands into gecko toes: ow.ly/EGRPD

These Adaptable, Self-Replicating Robots Surely Won't Tear The World Apart ... Right?

popsci.com — Watching the University of Oslo's three-limbed robot squirm across the floor like a dismembered starfish brings to mind shudder-inducing flashbacks of Stargate SG-1. More particularly, visions of SG-1's creepy-crawly nemesis, the Replicators, spider-like robots capable of well...replicating themselves...but also able to learn from their surroundings, adapt and generally tear apart entire worlds ( or spaceships).
Nov 20, 2014

RT @stuarthorrex: These Adaptable, Self-Replicating Robots Surely Won't Tear The World Apart ... Right? bit.ly/1F81f3S

Nov 20, 2014

ahhhh MT @PopSci: These adaptable, self-replicating robots won’t tear the world apart… right? popsci.com/norwegian-rese… pic.twitter.com/hnynSBxqQG

How Women's Bra Sizes Weirdly Correlate To Their Spending Habits

popsci.com — If you want to make billions in 2014, you have to understand big data. Chinese web sales giant Alibaba understands this concept better than most, as it utilizes comprehensive data analytics to predict how consumers are going to spend their money.

TGI Friday’s In-Restaurant Drone Hovers Mistletoe Over Customers' Heads

popsci.com — Circling overhead, the drone finds its prey seated below. The robot is looking not for specific identifying characteristics of people, but rather suspect behaviors. In the booth by the window, both patrons just scooted closer to one another and are now sitting leg-touching-leg. The behavior registers, the robot flies, and then hovers perfectly overhead.
Nov 20, 2014

Like a kiss cam only so much worse | TGI Friday’s Drone Hovers Mistletoe Over Customers' Heads pops.ci/4Omlfq via @PopSci