Science writer at The Atlantic. Blogger at Nat Geo's Phenomena. Author of I CONTAIN MULTITUDES, on animal-microbe partnerships, out 2016. http://t.co/KPpRi9xizW

I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (29 August 2015)

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Top picks Read the New Yorker's devastating Hiroshima story from 1946, of six ordinary lives, brutally interrupted. Here's David Attenborough saying a blue whale's heart is the size of a car.
Aug 29, 2015

Every week I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's tranche. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/29/ive…

Brian Nosek's Reproducibility Project Finds Many Psychology Studies Unreliable

theatlantic.com — A new study shows that the field suffers from a reproducibility problem, but the extent of the issue is still hard to nail down. Please consider disabling it for our site, or supporting our work in one of these ways Subscribe Now >
Aug 28, 2015

A massive team tried to replicate 100 published psychology studies. Most failed. Here's what that means. theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Aug 27, 2015

Massive study quantifies psychology's reproducibility problem. theatlantic.com/health/archive… Me on @BrianNosek's Reproducibility Project

Aug 27, 2015

My first piece in my new Atlantic job; feels good to return to the topic of reproducibility in science after a hiatus theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Aug 27, 2015

RT @edyong209: My first piece in my new Atlantic job; feels good to return to the topic of reproducibility in science after a hiatus theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Aug 27, 2015

RT @edyong209: My first piece in my new Atlantic job; feels good to return to the topic of reproducibility in science after a hiatus theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Show 28 more tweets from Robinson Meyer, Tim Carmody and others...

The Bacteria That Turn Amoebas Into Farmers

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Most people think of bacteria as germs, signs of filth, or unwanted bringers of disease. Slowly, that view is changing. It is now abundantly clear that the bacteria that live on the bodies of other creatures help their hosts by digesting food, providing nutrients, protecting against disease, detoxifying poisons, slaughtering prey, and even creating light.

When Parasites Attack, Flies Diversify Their Babies’ Genes

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Imagine an animal that reproduced by budding off genetically identical clones. This asexual creature doesn't have to bother with finding or attracting mates: it is a self-contained factory for making more of itself. This sounds like a recipe for success, but asexual animals are far from successful.
Aug 13, 2015

When parasites attack, flies can diversify their babies' genes! My new post on a very cool study. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/13/whe…

Aug 13, 2015

RT @edyong209: When parasites attack, flies can diversify their babies' genes! My new post on a very cool study. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/13/whe…

Aug 13, 2015

RT @edyong209: When parasites attack, flies can diversify their babies' genes! My new post on a very cool study. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/13/whe…

Aug 14, 2015

More on fruit flies diversifying the genes of their offspring when attacked by parasites from @edyong209: ow.ly/QUKdt

This Frog Uses Its Spiky Face to Deliver a Venomous Headbutt

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — When Carlos Jared was first 'stung' by the venomous face of the Greening's frog, he didn't realise what had happened. He had picked up one of the small creatures, and it started thrashing about as if trying to headbutt his hand. At first, it felt like being abraded by rough sandpaper.

I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (01 August 2015)

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Top picks A new illness or mass hysteria? The village in Kazakhstan where people fall asleep for days. Incredible story by Sarah Topol. One of the big myths: scientists know how drugs work.
Aug 01, 2015

RT @edyong209: Every week I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's bonanza. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/01/ive…

Aug 01, 2015

Every week I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's bonanza. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/01/ive…

Aug 01, 2015

RT @edyong209: Every week I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's bonanza. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/01/ive…

Why Do Glowing Sharks Glow?

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — There are about 550 species of shark in the oceans. Around twelve percent of them glow. These luminous fish belong to two groups: the kitefin sharks and the lanternsharks. They are little creatures, no bigger than 50 centimetres long, and they feed on small fish, squid, and crustaceans.
Jul 28, 2015

There are about 550 species of shark in the oceans. Around twelve percent of them glow. Why? phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/28/glo… My new post.

Jul 28, 2015

RT @edyong209: There are about 550 species of shark in the oceans. Around twelve percent of them glow. Why? phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/28/glo… My new post.

Jul 28, 2015

RT @debcha: Twelve percent of shark species GLOW IN THE DARK. GLOW IN THE DARK SHARKS. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/28/glo… [@edyong209, obviously]

Show 1 more tweet from Lauren Beukes

Leaky Vaccines Enhance Spread of Deadlier Chicken Viruses

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Over the past fifty years, Marek's disease-an illness of fowl-has become fouler. Marek's is caused by a highly contagious virus, related to those that cause herpes in humans. It spreads through the dust of contaminated chicken coops, and caused both paralysis and cancer. In the 1970s, new vaccines brought the disease the under control.
Jul 27, 2015

This study on virus evolution has implications for next-gen vaccines against things like HIV and malaria phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/27/lea…

Jul 27, 2015

RT @edyong209: This study on virus evolution has implications for next-gen vaccines against things like HIV and malaria phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/27/lea…

Jul 27, 2015

Nice piece by @edyong209 on the potential dangers of 'leaky' vaccines phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/27/lea… Wonder if it applies to RTS,S for malaria.

I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (25 July 2015)

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Some news Hi, I got a job! As of September, I'll be joining The Atlantic as their new full-time science staff reporter.
Jul 25, 2015

Every week, I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's smorgasbord phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/25/ive…

Abruptly Warming Climate Triggered Megabeast Revolutions

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Around 34,000 years ago, woolly mammoths went extinct from parts of Europe, only to be replaced by... woolly mammoths. The two groups-the disappearing individuals and their substitutes-belonged to the same species. If you looked at their fossils, you probably couldn't tell them apart.
Jul 24, 2015

Abruptly warming climate triggered cycles of disappearance and replacement among megabeasts. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/24/war…

Jul 24, 2015

RT @NatGeoScience: Thousands of years ago, abrupt climate change may have triggered the revolution of mammoths, bison, and more beasts: on.natgeo.com/1D01IYM

Jul 27, 2015

RT @JacquelynGill: Abruptly warming climate triggered megabeast revolutions: bit.ly/1VJ8NmT by @EdYong209

Jul 29, 2015

Ack. Misread that write-up on climate and megafauna extinctions study earlier. A bit more nuanced. Good piece here: phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/24/war…

More Articles →
Aug 30, 2015

@bernatolle Ludicrous. Those have exactly the same problems.

Aug 30, 2015

NatGeo piece on animals with the (relatively) biggest/smallest babies news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/150828… is missing the kiwi. audubon.org/sites/default/…

Aug 30, 2015

On Intern'tl Bat Weekend, I honour the New Zealand lesser short-tailed bat, which can fly but largely can't be arsed youtube.com/watch?v=B3S1gc…

Aug 30, 2015

It's International Bat Weekend! Mark it by being a billionaire, dressing up, & punching people with mental health problems, because reasons.


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