Science writer at The Atlantic, starting Sept. Blogger at Nat Geo's Phenomena. Author of I CONTAIN MULTITUDES, on animal-microbe partnerships, out 2016. Husband

Leaky Vaccines Enhance Spread of Deadlier Chicken Viruses

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Over the past fifty years, Marek's disease-an illness of fowl-has become fouler. Marek's is caused by a highly contagious virus, related to those that cause herpes in humans. It spreads through the dust of contaminated chicken coops, and caused both paralysis and cancer. In the 1970s, new vaccines brought the disease the under control.
Jul 27, 2015

This study on virus evolution has implications for next-gen vaccines against things like HIV and malaria phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/27/lea…

Jul 27, 2015

RT @edyong209: This study on virus evolution has implications for next-gen vaccines against things like HIV and malaria phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/27/lea…

Jul 27, 2015

Nice piece by @edyong209 on the potential dangers of 'leaky' vaccines phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/27/lea… Wonder if it applies to RTS,S for malaria.

I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (25 July 2015)

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Some news Hi, I got a job! As of September, I'll be joining The Atlantic as their new full-time science staff reporter.
Jul 25, 2015

Every week, I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's smorgasbord phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/25/ive…

Abruptly Warming Climate Triggered Megabeast Revolutions

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Around 34,000 years ago, woolly mammoths went extinct from parts of Europe, only to be replaced by... woolly mammoths. The two groups-the disappearing individuals and their substitutes-belonged to the same species. If you looked at their fossils, you probably couldn't tell them apart.
Jul 24, 2015

Abruptly warming climate triggered cycles of disappearance and replacement among megabeasts. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/24/war…

Jul 24, 2015

RT @NatGeoScience: Thousands of years ago, abrupt climate change may have triggered the revolution of mammoths, bison, and more beasts: on.natgeo.com/1D01IYM

Jul 27, 2015

RT @JacquelynGill: Abruptly warming climate triggered megabeast revolutions: bit.ly/1VJ8NmT by @EdYong209

A Fossil Snake With Four Legs

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Snakes can famously unhinge their jaws, and open their mouths to extreme widths. David Martill from the University of Portsmouth did his best impression of this trick while walking through the Bürgermeister Müller Museum in Solnhofen, Germany. He was pointing out the museum's fossils to a group of students.

How Giant Prawns Could Fight Tropical Disease and Poverty

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — In 1986, after almost five years of construction, the Diama Dam was finally completed along the mouth of the Senegal River. The dam stopped saltwater from intruding upstream, thus creating a stable reservoir of freshwater for farmers and for Senegal's capital city of Dakar. But it also had unintended consequences.
Jul 20, 2015

Giant prawns could fight tropical disease (and poverty) by eating parasite-carrying snails. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/20/how… #prawnstar #hardcoreprawn

Jul 20, 2015

Fill river with prawns, which eat snails, which carry parasites, which cause schistosomiasis. Boom. Less schisto. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/20/how…

Jul 20, 2015

RT @edyong209: Fill river with prawns, which eat snails, which carry parasites, which cause schistosomiasis. Boom. Less schisto. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/20/how…

Show 3 more tweets from Charles Duhigg, Ed Yong and others...

I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (18 July 2015)

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Top picks "On the face of it, earthquakes seem to present us with problems of space: the way we live along fault lines, in brick buildings, in homes made valuable by their proximity to the sea.
Jul 18, 2015

Every week I scour the Internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's PLUTO phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/18/ive…

How To Make Better Health Predictions From Our Gut Microbes

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — We all know people who act very differently depending on the company they find themselves in. They can be delightful in some circles, and obnoxious in others. The same principles apply to the microbes in our bodies-our microbiome. They have important roles in digestion, immunity, and health, but none of them is inherently good.
Jul 16, 2015

It's not enough to find bacteria that are more/less common in a disease. In the microbiome, everything's contextual phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/15/how…

Jul 16, 2015

RT @edyong209: It's not enough to find bacteria that are more/less common in a disease. In the microbiome, everything's contextual phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/15/how…

This Beetle is Ruining Your Coffee With the Help of Bacteria

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — I am writing a book about partnerships between animals and microbes. In the process, I have consumed a frankly obscene amount of coffee, to the extent that the dedication might just read " To coffee, with thanks ". So, it is with mixed emotions that I now write this post, about an animal that is ruining coffee with the help of bacteria.
Jul 14, 2015

Animal-microbe symbioses are all fun and games until they COME FOR MY GODDAMN COFFEE, THEN KILL THEM WITH FIRE. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/14/thi…

Jul 14, 2015

RT @edyong209: Animal-microbe symbioses are all fun and games until they COME FOR MY GODDAMN COFFEE, THEN KILL THEM WITH FIRE. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/14/thi…

Jul 14, 2015

RT @edyong209: Animal-microbe symbioses are all fun and games until they COME FOR MY GODDAMN COFFEE. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/14/thi…

Show 3 more tweets from Jennifer Ouellette, Rachel Feltman and others...

How to Program One of the Gut’s Most Common Microbes

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Last month, I wrote a feature for New Scientist about smart probiotics-bacteria that have been genetically programmed to patrol our bodies, report on what they find, and improve our health. Here's how the piece began: "[There's a] growing club of scientists who are tweaking our microbiome-the microbes that live in or on our bodies-in pursuit of better health.
Jul 10, 2015

Gut Microbe Programming for Dummies: new genetic tools for hacking B-theta, one of our most common gut bacteria phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/10/how…

Jul 11, 2015

Another great piece by @edyong209 - on MIT'ers who hacked part of the gut micro biome to detect and treat disease. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/10/how…

15-minute writing exercise closes the gender gap in university-level physics

By Ed Yong
blogs.discovermagazine.com — Think about the things that are important to you. Perhaps you care about creativity, family relationships, your career, or having a sense of humour. Pick two or three of these values and write a few sentences about why they are important to you. You have fifteen minutes. It could change your life.
Jul 09, 2015

@Sci_Adv @AndrewR_Physics No. That's not what the data suggests. Gender equity and "stereotype threat" are key: j.mp/1JSEoyO

More Articles →
Jul 28, 2015

@pathogenomenick I'm seriously annoyed, by both the awfulness and the incompetence

Jul 28, 2015

"After the Ebola crisis, other viruses are a hot research topic again"<--tackiest possible lead to press release not remotely about Ebola

Jul 27, 2015

This study on virus evolution has implications for next-gen vaccines against things like HIV and malaria phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/27/lea…

Jul 27, 2015

RT @JacquelynGill: Abruptly warming climate triggered megabeast revolutions: bit.ly/1VJ8NmT by @EdYong209

Jul 27, 2015

"Cicadas don’t seem too bothered, continuing about their short existence as if losing your butt is totally normal" twitter.com/SmithsonianMag…

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