Science writer at The Atlantic. Blogger at Nat Geo's Phenomena. Author of I CONTAIN MULTITUDES, on animal-microbe partnerships, out 2016. http://t.co/KPpRi9xizW

Last Week, I Went to Space

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Last week, I rode a rocket-powered plane into space. We thundered down a runway at the Mojave Air & Space Port, then pointed the nose nearly straight up and hurtled toward the stars. As we climbed, the sky started darkening-and out the window to my right, the horizon flipped 90 degrees to the left.

How Columbus Said Hello: He Tried Dancing

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — What do you do when the Thingy From Elsewhere lands on your front lawn, steps out of its mysterious vehicle and says-um, well, you haven't the faintest idea what it's saying. You stare at it and look for signs of niceness (or not-so-niceness). And if it doesn't eat you, what do you do next?

Clearing the Body's Retired Cells Slows Aging, Extends Life

theatlantic.com — A series of experiments in mice has led to what some are calling "one of the more important aging discoveries ever." Please consider disabling it for our site, or supporting our work in one of these ways Subscribe Now >
Feb 03, 2016

Clearing the Body's Retired Cells Slows Aging, Extends Life theatlantic.com/science/archiv… My latest at the Atlantic.

Feb 03, 2016

"If it's correct, without wanting to be too hyperbolic, it’s one of the more important aging discoveries ever" theatlantic.com/science/archiv…

Feb 03, 2016

RT @edyong209: "If it's correct, without wanting to be too hyperbolic, it’s one of the more important aging discoveries ever" theatlantic.com/science/archiv…

Feb 03, 2016

RT @edyong209: "If it's correct, without wanting to be too hyperbolic, it’s one of the more important aging discoveries ever" theatlantic.com/science/archiv…

Feb 03, 2016

RT @edyong209: "If it's correct, without wanting to be too hyperbolic, it’s one of the more important aging discoveries ever" theatlantic.com/science/archiv…

Show 11 more tweets from Steve Silberman, Alan Boyle and others...

The Weird Thing About Cat Legs

By Ed Yong
theatlantic.com — Please consider disabling it for our site, or supporting our work in one of these ways Subscribe Now > One block of large enclosures houses the bigger species-snow leopard, puma, jaguar, and the extremely rare Amur leopard.
Feb 02, 2016

There's a weird thing about cat legs that unites domestic tabbies with crouching tigers. theatlantic.com/science/archiv…

Feb 02, 2016

In which I watch @JohnRHutchinson & co utterly fail to do science with some cats theatlantic.com/science/archiv…

Feb 02, 2016

In which @edyong209 ruins important scientific research by scaring away a bunch of cats: theatln.tc/1mawnLf

Feb 02, 2016

RT @andersen: In which @edyong209 ruins important scientific research by scaring away a bunch of cats: theatln.tc/1mawnLf

Feb 02, 2016

"We are, I realize, trying to out-stealth a cat. It's going about as well as you'd expect." So good, by @edyong209. theatlantic.com/science/archiv…

Show 9 more tweets from Tanya Lewis, Sarah Britten and others...

Last-Ditch Resistance: What Is The Role Of Food?

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — The sudden recognition of last-ditch antibiotic resistance moving across the globe-via mcr-1, a newly identified gene that protects bacteria against the action of the last-resort antibiotic colistin-vanished from the news this past month as concern for Zika virus ramped up. But it's about to become important again.
Feb 01, 2016

In China, researchers find supermarket chicken carrying 2 dire antibiotic resistance factors, MCR and NDM. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2016/02/01/col…

Feb 01, 2016

RT @marynmck: In China, researchers find supermarket chicken carrying 2 dire antibiotic resistance factors, MCR and NDM. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2016/02/01/col…

No, Really, Other Animals Don't Have Chins

By Ed Yong
theatlantic.com — "For these reasons, it is generally agreed that whatever the biological situation occurring on the front of the elephant lower jaw, it is fundamentally different from the condition in humans," says James Pampush, who recently reviewed the various possible origin stories for the human chin.
Jan 29, 2016

No, seriously, other animals don't have chins. Not cats, horses, elephants. A follow-up to y'day's chinvestigation: theatlantic.com/notes/2016/01/…

Jan 29, 2016

@pbump @GrahamDavidA It scratched its lower mandible, ashamed by its lack of protrusion. theatlantic.com/notes/2016/01/…

Jan 29, 2016

RT @edyong209: No, seriously, other animals don't have chins. Not cats, horses, elephants. A follow-up to y'day's chinvestigation: theatlantic.com/notes/2016/01/…

Jan 29, 2016

RT @edyong209: No, seriously, other animals don't have chins. Not cats, horses, elephants. A follow-up to y'day's chinvestigation: theatlantic.com/notes/2016/01/…

We're The Only Animals With Chins, and No One Knows Why

Jan 28, 2016

No one really knows why we have chins. Despite research and lots of chin scratching - apple.news/AcffKUX6uT_uF1…

Jan 28, 2016

Humans are the only animals with chins, and despite much chin-stroking, no one knows why. theatlantic.com/science/archiv…

Jan 28, 2016

In which I explain why the three little pigs were filthy liars theatlantic.com/science/archiv…

Show 41 more tweets from Elizabeth Lopatto, Chelsey Dulaney and others...

How Jaguars Survived the Ice Age

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — The mastodons, ground sloths, and sabercats are all gone. They all slipped into extinction around 10,000 or so years ago, along with an even wider variety of fantastic beasts and birds that fall under the category "megafauna." But not all the Ice Age megamammals died out.
Jan 27, 2016

RT @NatGeo: Mastodons, ground sloths, and sabercats disappeared after the Ice Age. How did jaguars survive? on.natgeo.com/1QEhnlD

Jan 28, 2016

How jaguars survived the ice age. Fascinating, by @Laelaps phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2016/01/27/how… (My 1st reaction was, wait there weren't cars back then…)

Jan 28, 2016

RT @mkonnikova: How jaguars survived the ice age. Fascinating, by @Laelaps phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2016/01/27/how… (My 1st reaction was, wait there weren't cars back then…)

Feb 01, 2016

RT @NatGeo: Mastodons, ground sloths, and sabercats disappeared after the Ice Age. How did jaguars survive? on.natgeo.com/1QEhnlD

Are These Crime Drama Clues Fact or Fiction?

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — I'm often just as surprised by what forensic scientists do as by what they can. In the Netflix documentary Making a Murderer , for instance, the question of whether police planted the main character's blood at a crime scene comes down to whether or not the FBI can detect a common laboratory chemical called EDTA in a bloodstain.
Jan 27, 2016

"The reality is that forensic science today is a strange mix of the high-tech and the outdated" - @GoryErika phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2016/01/26/are…

Jan 27, 2016

"The reality is that forensic science today is a strange mix of the high-tech and the outdated" bit.ly/1nnYGqg

To Lions, Zebras Are Mostly Gray

Jan 26, 2016

RT @edyong209: To lions, zebras mostly look grey. A post on stripe evolution, featuring Bill Bailey and Dr Seuss theatlantic.com/science/archiv…

Jan 26, 2016

Zebra stripes: rubbish for camouflage, probably quite good at deterring flies theatlantic.com/science/archiv…

Jan 26, 2016

RT @edyong209: Zebra stripes: rubbish for camouflage, probably quite good at deterring flies theatlantic.com/science/archiv…

Jan 27, 2016

Why are zebras stripey? No one knows but we're not short of hypotheses. theatlantic.com/science/archiv… (Also, the Onion: theonion.com/americanvoices…)

Show 1 more tweet from Adrienne LaFrance
More Articles →
Feb 05, 2016

RT @kathrynschulz: Thanks to a local meteor crater, I just learned the most wonderful word, astrobleme: star-wound.

Feb 05, 2016

@rmflight Nope. I have no interest in press releases and would be entirely happy if they just disappeared altogether.

Feb 05, 2016

"Movies are more likely to portray men’s stalking as charming and women’s as crazy." theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Feb 05, 2016

Another plug for @mwilsonsayres wonderful letter to students, on the subject of harassment: mathbionerd.blogspot.co.uk/2016/02/you-ar…

Feb 05, 2016

@cariromm @andersen He went on to be repeatedly terrorised by zombies, so that's where making creepy signs lands you.

Feb 05, 2016

RT @brookeborel: Lively! (wish Steve Hall were on Twitter) --> The Embarrassing, Destructive Fight over Biotech's Big Breakthrough https://…


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