Science writer, freelance journalist, husband. I CONTAIN MULTITUDES--on partnerships between animals & microbes--out in 2016. flavors.me/edyong

I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (20 December 2014)

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Top picks " The lizard was produced in the laboratory by mating two other species, and its creation defies conventional ideas about how new species evolve."

When Threatened By Worms, Bacteria Summon Killer Fungi

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — When you're the size of a human, you worry about lions and tigers and bears. But if you're a bacterium, a tiny nematode worm, just a millimetre long, can be a vicious predator. Nematodes are among the most common animals on the planet, and many of them hunt bacteria in soil and water.

Best of 2014 | Longreads Blog

blog.longreads.com — We asked a few writers and editors to choose some of their favorite stories of the year in specific categories. Here, the best in science writing. * * * Virginia Hughes Science reporter and soon-to-be science editor at BuzzFeed. I've thought about this story (an excerpt from Storr's book, The Unpersuadables ) many, many times since reading it.

Why Does This Weird Insect Flash Warnings After An Attack?

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Kate Umbers was hiking through Australia's Snowy Mountains in the autumn of 2008, when she saw her first mountain katydid-a thumb-sized insect with the colour and texture of a dead leaf. "I recognised it from the guide books and picked it up excitedly," she says. "It immediately vomited and flashed its bright colours."

Not Exactly Rocket Science

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Six years ago, I spent an hour at David Attenborough's house, talking to him about wildlife, film-making and his career. Three weeks ago, I spent 20 minutes in a London bar, telling people about the experience at an incarnation of Story Collider -the wonderful event where people tell personal stories about science.

I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (13 December 2014)

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Top picks Nine things I wish people understood about anxiety. Highly recommended, by Kady Morrison. TIME have gone and ruined a years-long run of mocking by choosing a really good Person(s) of the Year: the Ebola fighters.

The Long War Against the Iron Pirates

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Disease is an act of piracy. When microbes infect us, they steal our resources so they can thrive at our expense. We fight them off with direct attacks, using an army of immune cells and antibodies. But we also have subtler countermeasures: we can, for example, deprive them of the nutrients they need.

Genes from Chagas parasite can transfer to humans and be passed on to children

By Ed Yong
scienceblogs.com — Millions of people in Latin America have been invade by a parasite - a trypanosome called Trypanosome cruzi. They are passed on through the bite of the blood-sucking assassin bug and they cause Chagas disease, a potentially fatal illness that affects the heart and digestive system.

I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (06 December 2014)

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Top picks " My Great-Great-Aunt Discovered Francium. And It Killed Her." This piece by Veronique Greenwood, about the false romance of self-sacrificing scientists, is one of the best of the year-a wonderful piece of assured, considered writing that readers will savour and writers should deconstruct.

Electric Eels Can Remotely Control Their Prey’s Muscles

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — A fish swims in the Amazon, amid murky water and overgrown vegetation. It is concealed, but it's not safe. Suddenly, two rapid bursts of electricity course through the water, activating the neurons that control the fish's muscles. It twitches, giving away its position, and dooming itself.
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Dec 20, 2014

RT @AstroKatie: Tweeps who post cool sciency images with no attribution or additional info: all the side eye. #subtweetinghalftheinternet

Dec 20, 2014

My partner & I did a solo waltz at our dance school's Christmas social, & we didn't forget our steps, lose time, or explode. VICTORY.

Dec 20, 2014

Every week, I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's cavalcade phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/12/20/ive…

Dec 20, 2014

Watching a robin in the garden, annihilating a worm, with a little glint of velociraptor in its eye.

Dec 20, 2014

@kathrynschulz @megangarber Phone corrected weirded to worded. Stop subtweeting me, phone

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