Science writer at The Atlantic, starting Sept. Blogger at Nat Geo's Phenomena. Author of I CONTAIN MULTITUDES, on animal-microbe partnerships, out 2016. Husband

I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (01 August 2015)

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Top picks A new illness or mass hysteria? The village in Kazakhstan where people fall asleep for days. Incredible story by Sarah Topol. One of the big myths: scientists know how drugs work.
Aug 01, 2015

RT @edyong209: Every week I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's bonanza. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/01/ive…

Aug 01, 2015

Every week I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's bonanza. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/01/ive…

Aug 01, 2015

RT @edyong209: Every week I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's bonanza. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/01/ive…

Why Do Glowing Sharks Glow?

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — There are about 550 species of shark in the oceans. Around twelve percent of them glow. These luminous fish belong to two groups: the kitefin sharks and the lanternsharks. They are little creatures, no bigger than 50 centimetres long, and they feed on small fish, squid, and crustaceans.
Jul 28, 2015

There are about 550 species of shark in the oceans. Around twelve percent of them glow. Why? phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/28/glo… My new post.

Jul 28, 2015

RT @edyong209: There are about 550 species of shark in the oceans. Around twelve percent of them glow. Why? phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/28/glo… My new post.

Jul 28, 2015

RT @debcha: Twelve percent of shark species GLOW IN THE DARK. GLOW IN THE DARK SHARKS. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/28/glo… [@edyong209, obviously]

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Leaky Vaccines Enhance Spread of Deadlier Chicken Viruses

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Over the past fifty years, Marek's disease-an illness of fowl-has become fouler. Marek's is caused by a highly contagious virus, related to those that cause herpes in humans. It spreads through the dust of contaminated chicken coops, and caused both paralysis and cancer. In the 1970s, new vaccines brought the disease the under control.
Jul 27, 2015

This study on virus evolution has implications for next-gen vaccines against things like HIV and malaria phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/27/lea…

Jul 27, 2015

RT @edyong209: This study on virus evolution has implications for next-gen vaccines against things like HIV and malaria phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/27/lea…

Jul 27, 2015

Nice piece by @edyong209 on the potential dangers of 'leaky' vaccines phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/27/lea… Wonder if it applies to RTS,S for malaria.

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I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (25 July 2015)

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Some news Hi, I got a job! As of September, I'll be joining The Atlantic as their new full-time science staff reporter.
Jul 25, 2015

Every week, I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's smorgasbord phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/25/ive…

Abruptly Warming Climate Triggered Megabeast Revolutions

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Around 34,000 years ago, woolly mammoths went extinct from parts of Europe, only to be replaced by... woolly mammoths. The two groups-the disappearing individuals and their substitutes-belonged to the same species. If you looked at their fossils, you probably couldn't tell them apart.
Jul 24, 2015

Abruptly warming climate triggered cycles of disappearance and replacement among megabeasts. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/24/war…

Jul 24, 2015

RT @NatGeoScience: Thousands of years ago, abrupt climate change may have triggered the revolution of mammoths, bison, and more beasts: on.natgeo.com/1D01IYM

Jul 27, 2015

RT @JacquelynGill: Abruptly warming climate triggered megabeast revolutions: bit.ly/1VJ8NmT by @EdYong209

Jul 29, 2015

Ack. Misread that write-up on climate and megafauna extinctions study earlier. A bit more nuanced. Good piece here: phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/24/war…

A Fossil Snake With Four Legs

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Snakes can famously unhinge their jaws, and open their mouths to extreme widths. David Martill from the University of Portsmouth did his best impression of this trick while walking through the Bürgermeister Müller Museum in Solnhofen, Germany. He was pointing out the museum's fossils to a group of students.

How Giant Prawns Could Fight Tropical Disease and Poverty

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — In 1986, after almost five years of construction, the Diama Dam was finally completed along the mouth of the Senegal River. The dam stopped saltwater from intruding upstream, thus creating a stable reservoir of freshwater for farmers and for Senegal's capital city of Dakar. But it also had unintended consequences.
Jul 20, 2015

Giant prawns could fight tropical disease (and poverty) by eating parasite-carrying snails. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/20/how… #prawnstar #hardcoreprawn

Jul 20, 2015

Fill river with prawns, which eat snails, which carry parasites, which cause schistosomiasis. Boom. Less schisto. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/20/how…

Jul 20, 2015

RT @edyong209: Fill river with prawns, which eat snails, which carry parasites, which cause schistosomiasis. Boom. Less schisto. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/20/how…

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I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (18 July 2015)

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Top picks "On the face of it, earthquakes seem to present us with problems of space: the way we live along fault lines, in brick buildings, in homes made valuable by their proximity to the sea.
Jul 18, 2015

Every week I scour the Internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's PLUTO phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/18/ive…

How To Make Better Health Predictions From Our Gut Microbes

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — We all know people who act very differently depending on the company they find themselves in. They can be delightful in some circles, and obnoxious in others. The same principles apply to the microbes in our bodies-our microbiome. They have important roles in digestion, immunity, and health, but none of them is inherently good.
Jul 16, 2015

It's not enough to find bacteria that are more/less common in a disease. In the microbiome, everything's contextual phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/15/how…

Jul 16, 2015

RT @edyong209: It's not enough to find bacteria that are more/less common in a disease. In the microbiome, everything's contextual phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/15/how…

This Beetle is Ruining Your Coffee With the Help of Bacteria

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — I am writing a book about partnerships between animals and microbes. In the process, I have consumed a frankly obscene amount of coffee, to the extent that the dedication might just read " To coffee, with thanks ". So, it is with mixed emotions that I now write this post, about an animal that is ruining coffee with the help of bacteria.
Jul 14, 2015

Animal-microbe symbioses are all fun and games until they COME FOR MY GODDAMN COFFEE, THEN KILL THEM WITH FIRE. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/14/thi…

Jul 14, 2015

RT @edyong209: Animal-microbe symbioses are all fun and games until they COME FOR MY GODDAMN COFFEE, THEN KILL THEM WITH FIRE. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/14/thi…

Jul 14, 2015

RT @edyong209: Animal-microbe symbioses are all fun and games until they COME FOR MY GODDAMN COFFEE. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/07/14/thi…

Show 3 more tweets from Jennifer Ouellette, Rachel Feltman and others...
More Articles →
Aug 03, 2015

RT @kissane: I smile at babies, at dogs, and when I'm happy. It's remarkably relaxing. nytimes.com/2015/08/02/fas…

Aug 03, 2015

RT @kathrynschulz: "False idea, false appearance, false story, false body": turns out figment, feign, fiction & effigy all share a root. ht…

Aug 03, 2015

Jericho the lion, Cecil's brother who was reputedly also killed, is alive and not Cecil's brother. But still a lion. news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/150802…

Aug 03, 2015

RT @vero_greenwood: Exploration is NOT a universal urge. It's bizarre that it's held up as a universal good. aeon.co/magazine/cultu…

Aug 03, 2015

RT @AdrienneLaF: Where to move to escape climate-change-related doom: Switzerland, maybe. theatlantic.com/technology/arc…

Aug 03, 2015

RT @realscientists: And, yes, the beaches in Madagascar are beautiful. Almost makes up for the terrestrial leeches. pic.twitter.com/mrRCoE7ZNj

Aug 03, 2015

RT @RachelFeltman: Bees naturally vaccinate their babies, scientists find wpo.st/5jGT0

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