Ed Yong on Muck Rack

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London, UK
Freelance Journalist

Science writer, freelance journalist, husband. I CONTAIN MULTITUDES--on partnerships between animals & microbes--out in 2016. t.co/YXhREfEToe

I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (22 November 2014)

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Top picks "It is famous for fire, but you get there by water..." And so begins the best piece I've read this year-a masterpiece by Kathryn Schulz about wildfires, a tragedy, and our relationship with nature.

The Ed's Up #59

By Ed Yong
tinyletter.com — Froggys Fog Swamp Juice is billed as "the world's greatest fog". According to the manufacturers, it produces a long-lasting artificial mist that has been used in haunted houses, nightclubs, skating rinks, theme parks, and even police and fire departments. Colleen Farmer used it to study how an iguana breathes.

Stickleback genome reveals detail of evolution’s repeated experiment

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Apathy, weary sighs, and fatigue: these are the symptoms of the psychological malaise that Carl Zimmer calls Yet Another Genome Syndrome. It is caused by the fast-flowing stream of publications, announcing the sequencing of another complete genome. News reports about such publications tend to follow the same pattern.

What Disco Fog Taught Us About Iguana Lungs

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Froggys Fog Swamp Juice is billed as "the world's greatest fog". According to the manufacturers, it produces a long-lasting artificial mist that has been used in haunted houses, nightclubs, skating rinks, theme parks, and even police and fire departments. Colleen Farmer used it to study how an iguana breathes.

The Fault in Our Stars Might be a Virus

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — In June 2013, starfish on the western coast of North America started wasting away. At first, their arms curled from the tips, and they tied themselves into pretzel-like knots. Their bodies deflated. White festering sores appeared on their flesh. As the lesions spread, their flesh rotted away and their arms fell off.

I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (15 November 2014)

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Top picks This week, we put a robot on a comet. Randall Munroe of XKCD live-cartooned the whole thing (here's a GIF). Matthew Francis and Megan Garber wrote great explanations.

How objectification silences women - the male glance as a psychological muzzle

By Ed Yong
scienceblogs.com — For something intangible, a glance can be a powerful thing. It can carry the weight of culture and history, it can cause psychological harm, and it can act as a muzzle. Consider the relatively simple act of a man staring at a woman's body. This is such a common part of modern society that most...

The Ed's Up #58

By Ed Yong
tinyletter.com — This is arguably one of the most important microbiome studies this year. A team of scientists has shown that DNA extraction kits, and other lab reagents commonly used in microbe studies, are almost always contaminated by low levels of microbial DNA.This cabal of contaminants, which I'm going to call "the Brady Bunch", poses a problem for studies of microbe communities, or microbiomes.

Pregnant Snake Prepares For Motherhood By Eating Toxic Toads

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Some expectant mothers prepare for the arrival of their babies by reading books of parenting tips, painting nurseries, and buying a pram. The tiger keelback snake takes a different approach. When females get pregnant, they slither into the forest to eat as many poisonous toads as they can find.

Contaminomics: Why Some Microbiome Studies May Be Wrong

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — You've got a group of people with a mysterious disease, and you suspect that some microbe might be responsible. You collect blood and tissue samples, you extract the DNA from them using a commonly used kit of chemicals, and you sequence the lot. Eureka!
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Nov 22, 2014

RT @Kim_Moynahan: @edyong209 btw, on your rec, just got The Forest Unseen. Opened to random pg, read a paragraph, then burned all my manuscripts. Thx.

Nov 22, 2014

40 yrs ago, Donald Johanson discovered an incredible fossil called Lucy. Now he reflects on the find nature.com/news/lucy-disc…

Nov 22, 2014

@alicebell That would be a fun advanced trivia game. Answer these questions based on what people knew at X point in history.

Nov 22, 2014

At some point, I'm gonna run out of collective words (and have already doubled up on "hoard" apparently) twitter.com/search?f=realt…

Nov 22, 2014

FWIW, I think this week's selection of missing links is a particularly strong set. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/11/22/ive…

Nov 22, 2014

Every week, I scour the Internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's parade: phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/11/22/ive…

Nov 22, 2014

RT @carlzimmer: For those of us fascinated by viruses, 2015 is going to be a big year. Happy 100th birthday, phage! 2015phage.org/index.php

Nov 22, 2014

RT @RandomVentures: Blimey, it's the evening for interesting article on the internet. This one about passwords is epic: nytimes.com/2014/11/19/mag…

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