Science writer at The Atlantic. Blogger at Nat Geo's Phenomena. Author of I CONTAIN MULTITUDES, on animal-microbe partnerships, out 2016. http://t.co/KPpRi9xizW

A $1 Paper Microscope is Bringing Science to Everyone

theatlantic.com — Technology The super-cheap Foldscope carries on a centuries-long tradition of simple, curiosity-enabling microscopes. Please consider disabling it for our site, or supporting our work in one of these ways Subscribe Now > It took about six months for the jungle to kill Aaron Pomerantz's microscope.
Sep 01, 2015

It took six months for the jungle to kill @AaronPomerantz's fancy microscope. So he ordered a $1 origami one. theatlantic.com/technology/arc…

Sep 01, 2015

On simple curiosity-enabling microscopes, from Leeuwenhoek to the modern $1 Foldscope theatlantic.com/technology/arc… My latest for @TheAtlantic

Show 4 more tweets from Ed Yong, Davide Castelvecchi and others...

Ed Yong - The Atlantic

By Ed Yong
theatlantic.com — The Atlantic covers news and analysis on politics, business, culture, technology, national, international and life on the official site of The Atlantic Magazine.

Bug Stops Food Halfway Down Its Gut to Make Room for Microbes

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Your gut is a long continuous tube. Food goes in one end, gets digested and stripped of nutrients, and is shunted out the other end. That's the case in ants and elephants, lions and sea lions, hawks and hawk moths. But not in stinkbugs.
Aug 31, 2015

These bugs stop the flow of food halfway down their gut to make room for microbes phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/31/bug… (Yes, my blog is still going.)

Aug 31, 2015

RT @edyong209: These bugs stop the flow of food halfway down their gut to make room for microbes phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/31/bug… (Yes, my blog is still going.)

Aug 31, 2015

RT @edyong209: These bugs stop the flow of food halfway down their gut to make room for microbes phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/31/bug… (Yes, my blog is still going.)

Sep 01, 2015

RT @number_three: Weird & awesome: Insect’s intestinal organ specialized for microbes bit.ly/1FgDNju bit.ly/1FgDOnB via @ed…

Show 1 more tweet from April Fulton

‘Phantom Road’ Experiment Shows How Traffic Noise Harms Birds

theatlantic.com — Technology A clever experiment reveals how fake traffic noise drives songbirds out of forests and harms the ones that stay behind. Please consider disabling it for our site, or supporting our work in one of these ways Subscribe Now > To do that, his team, including masters student and postdoctoral researcher Christopher McClure , recorded the sound of a dozen cars zooming through Glacier National Park.
Aug 31, 2015

Scientists build "phantom road" in forest to show how traffic noise harms birds. theatlantic.com/technology/arc… My new piece at the Atlantic.

Aug 31, 2015

While I interviewed this guy about traffic noise pollution, a fire engine drove past his office and drowned him out theatlantic.com/technology/arc…

Aug 31, 2015

RT @edyong209: While I interviewed this guy about traffic noise pollution, a fire engine drove past his office and drowned him out theatlantic.com/technology/arc…

Aug 31, 2015

RT @edyong209: Scientists build "phantom road" in forest to show how traffic noise harms birds. theatlantic.com/technology/arc… My new piece at the Atlantic.

Aug 31, 2015

RT @edyong209: While I interviewed this guy about traffic noise pollution, a fire engine drove past his office and drowned him out theatlantic.com/technology/arc…

Show 7 more tweets from Melissa C. Lott, Ed Yong and others...

I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (29 August 2015)

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Top picks Read the New Yorker's devastating Hiroshima story from 1946, of six ordinary lives, brutally interrupted. Here's David Attenborough saying a blue whale's heart is the size of a car.
Aug 29, 2015

Every week I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's tranche. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/29/ive…

Brian Nosek's Reproducibility Project Finds Many Psychology Studies Unreliable

theatlantic.com — A new study shows that the field suffers from a reproducibility problem, but the extent of the issue is still hard to nail down. Please consider disabling it for our site, or supporting our work in one of these ways Subscribe Now >
Aug 28, 2015

A massive team tried to replicate 100 published psychology studies. Most failed. Here's what that means. theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Aug 27, 2015

Massive study quantifies psychology's reproducibility problem. theatlantic.com/health/archive… Me on @BrianNosek's Reproducibility Project

Aug 27, 2015

My first piece in my new Atlantic job; feels good to return to the topic of reproducibility in science after a hiatus theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Aug 27, 2015

RT @edyong209: My first piece in my new Atlantic job; feels good to return to the topic of reproducibility in science after a hiatus theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Aug 27, 2015

RT @edyong209: My first piece in my new Atlantic job; feels good to return to the topic of reproducibility in science after a hiatus theatlantic.com/health/archive…

Show 28 more tweets from Robinson Meyer, Tim Carmody and others...

The Bacteria That Turn Amoebas Into Farmers

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Most people think of bacteria as germs, signs of filth, or unwanted bringers of disease. Slowly, that view is changing. It is now abundantly clear that the bacteria that live on the bodies of other creatures help their hosts by digesting food, providing nutrients, protecting against disease, detoxifying poisons, slaughtering prey, and even creating light.

When Parasites Attack, Flies Diversify Their Babies’ Genes

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Imagine an animal that reproduced by budding off genetically identical clones. This asexual creature doesn't have to bother with finding or attracting mates: it is a self-contained factory for making more of itself. This sounds like a recipe for success, but asexual animals are far from successful.
Aug 13, 2015

When parasites attack, flies can diversify their babies' genes! My new post on a very cool study. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/13/whe…

Aug 13, 2015

RT @edyong209: When parasites attack, flies can diversify their babies' genes! My new post on a very cool study. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/13/whe…

Aug 13, 2015

RT @edyong209: When parasites attack, flies can diversify their babies' genes! My new post on a very cool study. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/13/whe…

Aug 14, 2015

More on fruit flies diversifying the genes of their offspring when attacked by parasites from @edyong209: ow.ly/QUKdt

This Frog Uses Its Spiky Face to Deliver a Venomous Headbutt

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — When Carlos Jared was first 'stung' by the venomous face of the Greening's frog, he didn't realise what had happened. He had picked up one of the small creatures, and it started thrashing about as if trying to headbutt his hand. At first, it felt like being abraded by rough sandpaper.

I’ve Got Your Missing Links Right Here (01 August 2015)

By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Sign up for The Ed's Up -a weekly newsletter of my writing plus some of the best stuff from around the Internet. Top picks A new illness or mass hysteria? The village in Kazakhstan where people fall asleep for days. Incredible story by Sarah Topol. One of the big myths: scientists know how drugs work.
Aug 01, 2015

RT @edyong209: Every week I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's bonanza. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/01/ive…

Aug 01, 2015

Every week I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's bonanza. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/01/ive…

Aug 01, 2015

RT @edyong209: Every week I scour the internet for good reads (mostly science) so you don't have to. Here's this week's bonanza. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/01/ive…

More Articles →
Sep 03, 2015

Just read Robert Krulwich's tribute to his late friend Oliver Sacks and now have something in my eye. phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/03/the…

Sep 03, 2015

"It’s just this kind of situation that prompted Scotland Yard to form a team of super-recognizers." - @GoryErika phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/01/do-…

Sep 03, 2015

Why are there fish 8,370 metres below the ocean surface but none at 8,400 metres? deepseanews.com/2015/08/why-ar… Really interesting by @RebeccaRHelm

Sep 03, 2015

RT @BrendanNyhan: Argh nytimes.com/2015/09/01/opi… Attributing all reproducibility problems to hidden moderators & ignoring questionable researc…

Sep 03, 2015

@giagia @AdamRutherford @aoifemcl LOL, you summoned a random fuckwit. Like saying Candyman in front of the mirror.


Are You a Journalist?

Make a Portfolio

Create a free Muck Rack account to customize your profile and upload a portfolio of your best work.