Science writer at The Atlantic. Blogger at NatGeo's Phenomena. Author of I CONTAIN MULTITUDES, on animal-microbe partnerships, out 2016 edyong.flavors.me

The Sketch That Revolutionized DNA Sequencing

The Sketch That Revolutionized DNA Sequencing
By Ed Yong
theatlantic.com — The robot telescope settles on its target, a star that sits closer than all but a tiny fraction of the tens of billions of stellar systems that make up the Milky Way. Its mirror grabs light for 55 seconds, again and again. The robot telescope-called TRAPPIST-will observe the star for 245 hours across sixty-two nights, making 12,295 measurements.

Why Are Your Gut Microbes Different From Mine?

Why Are Your Gut Microbes Different From Mine?
theatlantic.com — To find out, scientists collected poop from thousands of people-but they ended up with more questions than answers. Please consider disabling it for our site, or supporting our work in one of these ways Subscribe Now >

A DNA Sequencer in Every Pocket

A DNA Sequencer in Every Pocket
theatlantic.com — A biotech company is building devices that will allow people to decipher genes in remote jungles, at sea, or even in space-and they say they're just getting started. Please consider disabling it for our site, or supporting our work in one of these ways Subscribe Now > Aboard the International Space Station, six people are currently orbiting the planet at 17,000 miles per hour, taking in fifteen sunrises and sunsets every day.

Future Smartphones Will Tell You What’s Killing Your Plants

Future Smartphones Will Tell You What’s Killing Your Plants
By Ed Yong
theatlantic.com — By amassing a huge library of leaf images, scientists are training computers to diagnose the diseases that threaten our food supply. Please consider disabling it for our site, or supporting our work in one of these ways Subscribe Now >

This Plant Bleeds Sweet Nectar To Recruit Ant Bodyguards

This Plant Bleeds Sweet Nectar To Recruit Ant Bodyguards
By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — Six years ago, Anke Steppuhn noticed that the bittersweet nightshade, when attacked by slugs and insects in a greenhouse, would bleed. Small droplets would exude from the wounds of its part-eaten leaves. At the same time, Steppuhn and her colleagues saw that the wild plants were often covered in ants.

Why We Sleep Badly on Our First Night in a New Place

Florida’s Dragon Problem

Florida’s Dragon Problem
theatlantic.com — Huge monitor lizards have invaded the state, and the rest of the U.S. is one unlucky boatload away. Ed Yong is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he covers science.

How to Survive a Fast, Venomous, Flesh-Destroying Snake

How to Survive a Fast, Venomous, Flesh-Destroying Snake
By Ed Yong
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com — The boy was thirteen years old when, while hunting for bush rats, he stuck his hand down the wrong hole. He was bitten by a saw-scaled viper. The boy's hand swelled up and his skin turned white. He started bleeding from huge open gashes in his knuckles and arms. Worse still, the flesh in his hand started rotting.

Dinosaurs Were Declining Way Before That Pesky Asteroid

Dinosaurs Were Declining Way Before That Pesky Asteroid
theatlantic.com — For at least 40 million years before their famed mass extinction, the dinosaurs were losing species faster than they could replace them.

Trees Have Their Own Internet

Trees Have Their Own Internet
theatlantic.com — A new study shows that trees of different species can exchange large amounts of carbon via the fungal internet that connects their roots. Please consider disabling it for our site, or supporting our work in one of these ways Subscribe Now >
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May 03, 2016

Andrew Gelman is right about the average quality of psych papers being published in PNAS. andrewgelman.com/2016/05/03/im-…

May 03, 2016

RT @pomeranian99: A bot was programmed to randomly pick objects on Thingiverse, remix them, post the result: arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/0… https:pic.twitter.com/OG1Nf8Vemg/t.co/OG1Nf8Vemg

May 03, 2016

RT @NatGeo: Snakebites kill up to 94,000 people worldwide every year—but a new, powerful antivenom may help reduce that number. https://t.con.natgeo.com/1rjstlW/LvU0l1Xhwx

May 02, 2016

RT @JessicaCussins: "Let people most affected by gene editing write #CRISPR rules" & other take-aways from Paris summit on Gene Editing htt…<a title="https://www.newscientist.com/article/2086548-let-people-most-affected-by-gene-editing-write-crispr-rules/" href="https://t.co/I9zRAB0XX5" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">newscientist.com/article/208654…

May 02, 2016

RT @kwren88: When it comes to the arrival of new diseases you must jump in with both feet or face the consequences later latimes.com/science/scienc…HK7Hm

May 02, 2016

@sethmnookin Like book writing and Legos but with your kidneys

May 02, 2016

RT @NatGeo: This just-discovered amphibian gets its name from a tall beast said to lurk in the rain forest. on.natgeo.com/1QOnIpy

May 02, 2016

David Deamer sent me the pages where he first sketched the concept of nanopore sequencing. theatlantic.com/notes/2016/05/… pic.twitter.com/8WTsMlG8ev


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