Journalist for @MPRNews. Wanderer. Traveler. Reader. Writer. Hiker. Amateur cook. Simplicity seeker. Lover of all things Latin America. Thoughts are my own.

Rochester wants Mayo to move on massive project

austindailyherald.com — Published 10:20am Wednesday, February 3, 2016 By Elizabeth Baier MPR.org/90.1 FM ROCHESTER - Sitting in the heart of downtown Rochester, there's an empty lot and three vacant buildings. It's supposed to be the first piece of Mayo Clinic's Destination Medical Center, a massive 20-year project, funded partly by the Legislature, intended to remake the downtown, generate $5 billion in private investment and draw 32,000 new residents to the city.

'Destination' unknown: Rochester wants Mayo to move on massive project

mprnews.org — Nearly three years after Mayo Clinic won state funding to help build its massive Destination Medical Center project, Rochester leaders want shovels in the ground but say it's been a slow start.
Feb 02, 2016

RT @MPRnews: 'Destination' unknown: Rochester wants Mayo to move on massive project ow.ly/XQdyk pic.twitter.com/J45uMqXIuT

Feb 02, 2016

RT @MPRnews: Rochester wants Mayo to move on massive Destination project ow.ly/XQgrD | @ElizabethBaier w/story, 8:27 ow.ly/XQgrE

Researchers give 2nd chance to American chestnut

thestate.com — Long rows of tightly planted American chestnut trees line a field here near the Minnesota-Iowa border. But these aren't your great-grandfather's chestnuts. Those 80-foot giants with massive trunks - the kind that led Longfellow to write, "Under a spreading chestnut tree, the village smithy stands" - were largely wiped out by an invasive fungus in the early 1900s, nearly eradicating the trees once known as the Redwoods of the East.

Researchers give 2nd chance to American chestnut

washingtontimes.com — CANTON, Minn. (AP) - Long rows of tightly planted American chestnut trees line a field here near the Minnesota-Iowa border. But these aren't your great-grandfather's chestnuts. Those 80-foot giants with massive trunks - the kind that led Longfellow to write, "Under a spreading chestnut tree, the village smithy stands" - were largely wiped out by an invasive fungus in the early 1900s, nearly eradicating the trees once known as the Redwoods of the East.

Researchers give 2nd chance to American chestnut

newsobserver.com — Long rows of tightly planted American chestnut trees line a field here near the Minnesota-Iowa border. But these aren't your great-grandfather's chestnuts. Those 80-foot giants with massive trunks - the kind that led Longfellow to write, "Under a spreading chestnut tree, the village smithy stands" - were largely wiped out by an invasive fungus in the early 1900s, nearly eradicating the trees once known as the Redwoods of the East.

Researchers give 2nd chance to American chestnut

macon.com — Long rows of tightly planted American chestnut trees line a field here near the Minnesota-Iowa border. But these aren't your great-grandfather's chestnuts.

Researchers give 2nd chance to American chestnut

ledger-enquirer.com — Long rows of tightly planted American chestnut trees line a field here near the Minnesota-Iowa border. But these aren't your great-grandfather's chestnuts.

Researchers give 2nd chance to American chestnut

heraldonline.com — Long rows of tightly planted American chestnut trees line a field here near the Minnesota-Iowa border. But these aren't your great-grandfather's chestnuts. Those 80-foot giants with massive trunks - the kind that led Longfellow to write, "Under a spreading chestnut tree, the village smithy stands" - were largely wiped out by an invasive fungus in the early 1900s, nearly eradicating the trees once known as the Redwoods of the East.

Chestnuts make a comeback - PostBulletin.com: Local

postbulletin.com — Long rows of tightly planted American chestnut trees line a field here near the Minnesota-Iowa border. But these aren't your great-grandfather's chestnuts. Those 80-foot giants with massive trunks - the kind that led Longfellow to write, "Under a spreading chestnut tree, the village smithy stands" - were largely wiped out by an invasive fungus in the early 1900s, nearly eradicating the trees once known as the Redwoods of the East.

John LaDue's location still a mystery to his family

mprnews.org — LaDue's father, David, says his son told him the city where he is but the family still doesn't know the name of the facility.
Jan 29, 2016

RT @MPRnews: John LaDue's location is still a mystery to his family. ow.ly/XHRS5

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RT @MPRnews: 2 new dog breeds join American Kennel Club's roster: American hairless terrier + the sloughi ow.ly/WHrhB pic.twitter.com/YQ7jmNMm0e


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