Money blogger for the @WashingtonPost. Read more: @GetThereWP. Send me your tips & questions: jonnelle.marte@washpost.com

Is the IRS doing enough to protect taxpayer data?

washingtonpost.com — The 104,000 people who had their most sensitive tax information stolen by hackers as part of the latest attack on the Internal Revenue Service are getting free credit monitoring services, courtesy of the agency. However, there's one major way that the protection might fall short: Much of the identity theft these consumers are vulnerable to now will not show up anywhere on their credit reports.

Criminals want your tax returns. Here's what you can do about it.

twincities.com — In the latest attack on the IRS, criminals went after something a lot more personal than money. Exploiting a weakness in the IRS' website, they obtained a motherlode of taxpayer information, including income levels, children's names, bank accounts and details about the specific tax credits people file for.

Congress is asking questions about IRS hack

washingtonpost.com — The Senate Finance Committee will hold a public hearing Tuesday morning to grill IRS officials about the data breach that gave criminals access to sensitive tax information about more than 100,000 consumers. This comes amid reports Wednesday afternoon that computer data indicated that the thieves were part of a Russian criminal operation, according to the Associated Press, which cited anonymous sources.

Why criminals are after your tax returns and what you should do about it

washingtonpost.com — In the latest attack on the IRS, criminals went after something a lot more personal than money. Exploiting a weakness in the IRS' Web site, they obtained a motherlode of taxpayer information, including income levels, children's names, bank accounts and details about the specific tax credits people file for.

A billionaire explains what investors always get wrong

washingtonpost.com — Traders often look at the news to anticipate what their next move should be. When will the Federal Reserve raise rates? Is the housing market rebouding? Is the jobs report going to be a disappointment? But Ken Fisher, author of "Beat the Crowd" and chief executive of Fisher Investments, says the trick to navigating the market successfully is to tune it all out.

Five big banks agree to pay more than $5 billion to settle regulatory charges

washingtonpost.com — Five of the world's largest banks have agreed to pay more than $5 billion in fines to settle charges made by various regulatory agencies and the Justice Department that the banks had acted in concert to manipulate international interest and foreign currency exchange rates.

The case for being overconfident about your retirement savings

washingtonpost.com — There's a good chance you don't know as much as you think you do about investing and retirement saving. But that's okay. About 25 percent of people are overconfident when it comes to their knowledge of investing, saving, taxes and insurance, according to a survey of 4,300 people by the National Association of Retirement Plan Participants, a nonprofit that works to improve retirement saving.

Group seeks to fine PayPal $25 million over credit allegations

sacbee.com — Consumers using PayPal to shop online were unknowingly signed up for credit lines and promised discounts and payment options they never received, according to a complaint filed in federal court by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). The agency wants PayPal pay $25 million for the actions, including $15 million in refunds for consumers and a $10 million penalty.

Group seeks to fine PayPal $25 million over credit allegations

miamiherald.com — Consumers using PayPal to shop online were unknowingly signed up for credit lines and promised discounts and payment options they never received, according to a complaint filed in federal court by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). The agency wants PayPal pay $25 million for the actions, including $15 million in refunds for consumers and a $10 million penalty.

Group seeks to fine PayPal $25 million over credit allegations

star-telegram.com — Consumers using PayPal to shop online were unknowingly signed up for credit lines and promised discounts and payment options they never received, according to a complaint filed in federal court by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). The agency wants PayPal pay $25 million for the actions, including $15 million in refunds for consumers and a $10 million penalty.
More Articles →
May 29, 2015

Why the IRS’s efforts to help identity theft victims are likely to fall short: wapo.st/1FHEl4a

May 29, 2015

Maybe those people going 'off the grid' in spy movies aren't entirely crazy. Is our data ever really safe? wapo.st/1GJA0Q6

May 29, 2015

The latest breach of IRS tax returns is part of a much bigger problem facing taxpayers wpo.st/hvOJ0 via @Reinlwapo

May 29, 2015

Why the help the IRS is offering to identity theft victims will not be enough: wapo.st/1FHEl4a

May 28, 2015

RT @JamesWagnerWP: Jayson Werth has two fractures in left wrist and is expected out until August. wapo.st/1GHGj6z

May 28, 2015

Congress will hold a hearing next week to grill IRS officials about how hackers stole taxpayer data. wapo.st/1dyDYjc

May 27, 2015

Congress is pressing the IRS for answers about the data hack: wapo.st/1dyDYjc

May 27, 2015

Why criminals are after your tax returns -- and what you should do about it: wapo.st/1FDi0Vp pic.twitter.com/rkygKIi841

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