Andrea Peterson on Muck Rack

Andrea Peterson Verified

Deep in the Nation's Capitol
Technology Policy Reporter and Blogger — Washington Post

Covering tech policy for @WashingtonPost via @TheSwitch. Opinions here mine, but feel free to borrow them. Tips? andrea.peterson[at]washpost[dot]com

Today’s Internet users are still being hurt by ’90s-era U.S. encryption policies

washingtonpost.com — Another week, another dire warning about the technology used to secure online communications. Internet security researchers are warning about a previously undisclosed vulnerability that affected all modern Web browsers - a weakness that could allow an attacker to snoop or even change communications thought to be secure.

UN report: Encryption is important to human rights - and backdoors undermine it

washingtonpost.com — A new report from the United Nation's Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights says digital security and privacy are essential to maintaining freedom of opinion and expression around the world -- and warns that efforts to weaken security tools in some countries may undermine it everywhere.

Online dating is more normal than ever. But it also comes with new risks.

washingtonpost.com — The sexual orientations and personal details of millions of Internet users may have been exposed in an alleged breach of a social networking site aimed at intimate encounters. But it's just the latest sign that Internet users looking for love online -- or just hoping to hook up -- face privacy and security risks they might not expect.

Edward Snowden weighs in on debate over NSA phone records program - on reddit

washingtonpost.com — The future of a National Security Agency spying program that collects the phone records of millions of Americans hangs in the balance as Congress debates whether it should renew the section of a controversial surveillance law used to authorize it, allow that part of the law to expire or replace it with a compromise bill.

Most Americans aren't using digital tools to keep data secret

startribune.com — Revelations about government snooping in recent years proved some of the most paranoid privacy advocates right. So it's perhaps no surprise that Americans in general are more worried about their privacy than ever. But those fears don't necessarily mean that people are taking the technical steps needed to actually keep their communications private.

Americans care about their digital privacy, but not enough to protect it

washingtonpost.com — Revelations about government snooping in recent years proved some of the most paranoid privacy advocates right. So, it's perhaps no surprise that Americans in general are more worried about their privacy than ever. But those fears don't necessarily mean that people are the taking technical steps needed to actually keep their communications private.

Cyberattack on CareFirst exposes data on 1.1 million customers in D.C., Md. and Va.

washingtonpost.com — CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield was the victim of a cyberattack that compromised information on about 1.1 million current and former customers, the health insurer that covers residents of D.C., Maryland and Virginia announced Monday. Several major health insurers have disclosed significant breaches this year, including Anthem, the nation's second largest health insurers, which revealed that data on nearly 80 million customers was compromised.

A guy named Bowser is now a Nintendo executive. Yes, really.

washingtonpost.com — After spending years kidnapping Princess Peach and riding a sweet rig in Mario Kart, Bowser is joining the corporate offices at Nintendo of America as vice president for sales. No wait, wrong Bowser. Nintendo of America announced on Monday that Doug Bowser was taking over as its new vice president for sales.

Apple v. Samsung case shows the difficulty of protecting designs

washingtonpost.com — A federal appeals court on Monday struck down a key part of Apple's legal victory over Samsung on smartphone design, a move that could slash hundreds of millions from the nearly $1 billion jury verdict that found Samsung had copied aspects of the iconic iPhone.

How the FTC is trying to protect shopper data caught up in Radioshack’s bankruptcy

washingtonpost.com — RadioShack's demise left techies with one place to buy gizmos and their information on the auction block: Customer data that the retailer collected over decades was among the assets for sale to the higher bidder as part of RadioShack's bankruptcy.
More Articles →
May 28, 2015

@futuraprime #teamactualgondolas Although after a while, doesn't the singing navigator just get kind of awkward?

May 28, 2015

Meet the 'Crypto Wars': How today's Internet users are still being hurt by '90s-era U.S. encryption policies washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-swit…

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