Andrea Peterson on Muck Rack

Andrea Peterson Verified

Deep in the Nation's Capitol
Technology Policy Reporter and Blogger — Washington Post

Covering tech policy for @WashingtonPost via @TheSwitch. Opinions here mine, but feel free to borrow them. Tips? andrea.peterson[at]washpost[dot]comCovering tech policy for @WashingtonPost via @TheSwitch. Opinions here mine, but feel free to borrow them.

Why the names of six people who complained of sexual assault were published online by Dallas police

washingtonpost.com — The Dallas Police Department made public the names, ages, and home addresses of some alleged sexual assault victims on an official website, an incident that highlights how the push to put more police records online may also be inadvertently leaving victims exposed. Dallas police are not alone in revealing the personal data of crime victims on the Internet.

Amazon unfairly billed parents for their kids’ in-app purchases, a judge rules

washingtonpost.com — A federal court found Amazon liable for charging parents for unauthorized in-app purchases made by kids, siding with the Federal Trade Commission in a case that stretched back to 2014. The key question in the legal battle was whether Amazon's app store made it too easy for children to buy virtual goods with real money inside games labeled as "free" without parental permission.

Twitter shares tumble as social network predicts hard road ahead

washingtonpost.com — Twitter showed modest growth in the number of active users on the social network Tuesday, but a gloomy forecast and revenues that missed Wall Street expectations sent the shares tumbling in after-hours trading. The growth in users, which reversed a decline in the previous quarter, was a faint sign of a turnaround at the ailing company.

Could Skull Echos and Brainprints Replace the Password?

gadgets.ndtv.com — What if you didn't have to keep remembering passwords - and instead they were literally inside your head? That's the gist behind new cutting-edge research that explores doing things such as watching how your brain responds to celebrity pictures or listening to sounds echoing around your skull to prove your identity.

Could skull echos and brainprints replace the password?

washingtonpost.com — What if you didn't have to keep remembering passwords - and instead they were literally inside your head? That's the gist behind new cutting-edge research that explores doing things like watching how your brain responds to celebrity pictures or listening to sounds echoing around your skull to prove your identity.

Google parent Alphabet sees a worrisome slowdown in online advertising

washingtonpost.com — Google's parent-company Alphabet reported first-quarter earnings Thursday that fell short of analysts' expectations as advertising revenue slowed more than Wall Street had expected. One of Alphabet's most important metrics -- the cost it gets paid each time a consumer clicks on a Google search link -- fell 9 percent in the first quarter.

The exact reasons why Europe is accusing Google of acting like a monopoly

washingtonpost.com — The European regulators on Wednesday announced formal antitrust charges against Google, accusing the tech giant of using its popular Android mobile operating system to push its own services over those of its rivals. Google created strong incentives for device manufacturers, ensuring that the company's search engine and browser would be dominant on Android devices, the European Commission alleged in a statement.

Why Google is warning that ‘google.com’ is ‘partially dangerous’

washingtonpost.com — Google is warning you to watch out for, well, Google. As of Tuesday morning, the search giant's own Safe Browsing tool labels " google.com" as "partially dangerous."

Google Books just won a decade-long copyright fight

nzherald.co.nz — The legal fight over Google's effort to create a digital library of millions of book is finally over. The Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a challenge from authors who had argued that the tech...

Google Books just won a decade-long copyright fight

washingtonpost.com — The decade-long legal fight over Google's effort to create a digital library of millions of books is finally over. The Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a challenge from authors who had argued that the tech giant's project was "brazen violation of copyright law" -- effectively ending the legal battle in Google's favor.
More Articles →
Apr 29, 2016

The Dallas Police Department posted names and addresses of some alleged sexual assault victims online. washingtonpost.com/news/the-switc…

Apr 20, 2016

Twenty minutes waiting for a ghost G8. Gave up. Then an 80 driver tried to roll past a stop with a near empty bus. Get it together, @wmata.

Apr 13, 2016

First click on a random Facebook stream from their Live Map. It was a woman gyrating in a swimsuit. Truly, the future of broadcasting.First click on a random Facebook stream from their Live Map. It was a woman gyrating in a swimsuit. Truly, the future of broadcasting.

Apr 12, 2016

Facebook and Microsoft's equal pay announcements come with an important asterisk washingtonpost.com/news/the-switc…


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