CNBC tech reporter

CircleUp launches secondary market

cnbc.com — Investing in private companies is notoriously risky. Most start-ups fail, and those that succeed can take a decade or longer to provide returns to shareholders. During a stock market rout, like the one experienced over the past two weeks, that risk is felt more acutely as investors aim to make sure they have ready access to cash.

What volatility? This start-up is worth $3.5 bln

cnbc.com — Tanium's selling point is that existing security solutions either don't work or require customers to make too many purchasing decisions. Rather than focusing on firewall protection, antivirus software and a host of other solutions, Tanium's technology is designed to span across entire corporate networks so I.T.

Apple is beating enterprise tech at its own game

cnbc.com — To see who's driving change in tech, look atop the market cap charts. Apple, Google, Microsoft, Facebook and Amazon lead the way. All five have massive consumer franchises, and Facebook is the only one among the group that doesn't sell to businesses.

Guess who a tech downturn could hurt the most

cnbc.com — John Lund | Agency Collection | Getty Images High-flying start-ups may well be able to weather a financial markets storm after raising monster sums of cash. However, the foundations, endowments and retirement funds that support them face a tougher slog. Limited partners (LPs) are the institutions that provide the money venture capital firms use to invest in start-ups.
Aug 31, 2015

Great in-depth look by @levynews on who'd be burnt in a tech market downturn, and it's not the start-ups: cnb.cx/1KfbxWf

How one start-up climbs the App Store ranks

cnbc.com — The top of the Apple iOS store is dominated by apps from Facebook and Google along with the occasional game. Climbing near the peak of the rankings of late is one service that doesn't fit that mold at all. Remind, which provides a free secure app for school teachers to communicate with students and parents, soared as high as No.

Will the tech stock plunge bleed to start-ups?

cnbc.com — Tech last week was sea of red. The Nasdaq 100 had its worst week since 2011. All 100 of its members fell, and about two-thirds of the index dropped by at least 5 percent. The sudden turn, tied to a broader stock market selloff, threatens to derail a six-year rally, including five years of double-digit gains.
Aug 24, 2015

Will the tech stock plunge bleed to start-ups? cnb.cx/1h8shRG Sky blue?

Aug 24, 2015

The trillion dollar startup question... > Will the tech stock plunge bleed to start-ups? cnb.cx/1EehsrE

This developer's code saved 'Game of Thrones'

cnbc.com — When HBO needed to figure out why the "Game of Thrones" season premiere last year crashed for users of its streaming service, it turned to software developer AppDynamics. So did Beachbody after fans of its popular 21 Day Fix weight-loss program suffered slow load times on mobile devices.

You can't get this from UberEATS or Instacart

cnbc.com — "One school says if the money is there you should take it," said Sabeti. "We'd need a specific plan to convert that money into growth." According to CB Insights, one-third of venture-backed companies in the food-delivery industry took in their first round of funding in the past year.
Aug 19, 2015

Turning down start-up dough: "We'd need a specific plan to convert that money into growth." cnb.cx/1E5AII3 @ZeroCater

Aug 19, 2015

"The really tricky thing is not getting money anymore," he said. "The really tricky thing is getting great talent." cnb.cx/1E5AsJ1

Aug 19, 2015

RT @CNBC: The food start-up that's raised only $1.5 million, but facilitated $100 million in sales: cnb.cx/1E5AII3 pic.twitter.com/UGzUoOlyhx

Aug 21, 2015

Why @zerocater isn’t looking for investors ht.ly/Rb2w4 #foodtech

Show 1 more tweet from Darren Smith

Why sleep start-up Casper is advertising on taxis

cnbc.com — Mattress start-up Casper recently raised $55 million to take on the sleep industry with a new Web-based model. Yet you're just as likely to see its ads in subway stations and on taxis as in your Facebook feed.

Gore Is Romney-Rich With $200 Million After Bush Defeat

bloomberg.com — May 6 (Bloomberg) -- In 1999, Al Gore, then U.S. vice president and a Democratic candidate for president, sold $6,000 worth of cows. The former senator, who spent most of his working life in Congress, had a net worth of about $1.7 million and assets that included pasture rents from a family farm and royalties from a zinc mine, remnants of his rural roots in Carthage, Tennessee.
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Sep 04, 2015

prediction: U.S. stocks will not tank on Monday.

Sep 04, 2015

8 years ago, Motorola bought Good Technology for over $400 mln. apparently @dshader and @dgwhorton sold at the right time.

Sep 03, 2015

I'm pretty sure Trump just announced Tom Brady as his running mate.

Sep 02, 2015

Awesome stuff. Can really be summed up in two words: Mark Trumbo twitter.com/SethKolloen/st…

Sep 02, 2015

The Dow's at its highest level since Monday.


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