Marilynn Marchione on Muck Rack

Marilynn Marchione Verified

Milwaukee
Chief Medical Writer — Associated Press
As seen in:  Associated Press, Yahoo, Bloomberg Businessweek, ABC News, Washington Post, Salon, USA Today, San Francisco Chronicle and 126 more
Covers:  consumer health news, major diseases_ cancer, medical research of broad consumer interest, heart disease, etc., pivotal or very novel clinical trials, infectious diseases, the new england journal of medicine
Doesn't Cover: health insurance, health care policy/politics, product pitches, early-stage clinical trials unless extremely novel, business-only news such as company earnings

I write national health stories and cover major medical meetings for The Associated Press

Marilynn Marchione's Biography

Marilynn Marchione became AP Medical Writer in 2004 after more than 25 years as a reporter and editor at metropolitan daily newspapers in Milwaukee, Chicago and Akron. She was named AP's Chief Medical Writer in September 2011.

At the AP, she has focused on consumer news, seeking daily and enterprise stories that give practical information that’s directly relevant to readers’ health choices. She covers major medical meetings for ...

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Study: Many Medicare cataract patients given needless tests

washingtonpost.com — Millions of older people are getting tests they don't need to prove they are healthy enough to have cataracts removed, a new study finds. The excess testing before this quick, ultra-safe eye procedure is costing them and Medicare a bundle, and many patients don't know they can question it, doctors say.

Study: Many Medicare cataract patients given needless tests

wsoctv.com — By MARILYNN MARCHIONE The Associated Press Millions of older people are getting tests they don't need to prove they are healthy enough to have cataracts removed, a new study finds. The excess testing before this quick, ultra-safe eye procedure is costing them and Medicare a bundle, and many patients don't know they can question it, doctors say.

Study: Many Medicare cataract patients given needless tests

health.usnews.com — Millions of older people are getting tests they don't need to prove they are healthy enough to have cataracts removed, a new study finds. The excess testing before this quick, ultra-safe eye procedure is costing them and Medicare a bundle, and many patients don't know they can question it, doctors say.

News from The Associated Press

hosted.ap.org — Millions of older people are getting tests they don't need to prove they are healthy enough to have cataracts removed, a new study finds. The excess testing before this quick, ultra-safe eye procedure is costing them and Medicare a bundle, and many patients don't know they can question it, doctors say.

Study: Needless tests given to Medicare cataract patients

seattletimes.com — Millions of older people are getting tests they don't need to prove they are healthy enough to have cataracts removed, a new study finds. The excess testing before this quick, ultrasafe eye procedure is costing them and Medicare a bundle, and many patients don't know they can question it, doctors say.

Study: Many Medicare cataract patients given needless tests

washingtontimes.com — Millions of older people are getting tests they don't need to prove they are healthy enough to have cataracts removed, a new study finds. The excess testing before this quick, ultra-safe eye procedure is costing them and Medicare a bundle, and many patients don't know they can question it, doctors say.

Study: Many Medicare cataract patients given needless tests

napavalleyregister.com — Millions of older people are getting tests they don't need to prove they are healthy enough to have cataracts removed, a new study finds. The excess testing before this quick, ultra-safe eye procedure is costing them and Medicare a bundle, and many patients don't know they can question it, doctors say.

Shorted on health: Genes that govern height play role in cholesterol, heart risks, study finds

Shorted on health: Genes that govern height play role in cholesterol, heart risks, study finds

vancouversun.com — We always believed Jim Benning when he said the Vancouver Canucks could be a playoff team this season. But we were skeptical, until now, about the addendum to the general manager's claim: that once in the National Hockey League playoffs, the Canucks might actually win.

Study: Short people’s genes may put them at higher risk of heart disease

globalnews.ca — Short people have more risk for heart disease, and now researchers may know why: Genes that govern height also seem to affect cholesterol, especially in men. Doctors have suspected that height and heart risks are related. Shorter people are more prone to heart attacks, high blood pressure and diabetes than taller people are, but the reason has been unclear.
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Apr 27, 2015

RT @virginiahughes: scaremongering alert: in article about Chipotle, NYT says that GMOs "lurk in" many ingredients nytimes.com/2015/04/27/bus…

Apr 22, 2015

Eds at @NEJM call homosexuality a 'normal expression of sexuality,' urge #SCOTUS to recognize #SameSexMarriage nej.md/1DhRCwX

Apr 16, 2015

RT @jadonn7: The granddaddy of Gulf oil spills? Not BP!! Maybe this one. bit.ly/1D8BSey

Apr 16, 2015

RT @MalcolmRitter: The power of puppy eyes: Dogs trigger bonding response in owners, just by looking at them. bit.ly/1b7jNb7

Apr 16, 2015

Congrats to @garyschwitzer for keeping healthnewsreview.org going for 9 years. It has undoubtedly raised the bar for health journalism



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