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National K-12 Education Reporter — New York Times

New York Times national K-12 education reporter. Back in the day: covered economics, book publishing, real estate. Still interested in all of it. WSJ, FT alum.

Nation’s Wealthy Places Pour Private Money Into Public Schools, Study Finds

nytimes.com — From bake sales to gala auctions, private groups are raising an increasing amount of money for public schools in wealthier communities, highlighting concerns about inequality. In Coronado, Calif., a wealthy enclave off the coast of San Diego, for example, local education groups, which support about 3,200 students in five schools, raised more than $1,500 per student in 2010.

Los Angeles Schools Chief Resigns After Mounting Criticism

nytimes.com — After three and a half tumultuous years as the head of the nation's second largest school district, John E. Deasy, superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District, resigned on Thursday after reaching an agreement with the school board. Ramon C.

Philadelphia Teachers Hit by Latest Cuts

nytimes.com — PHILADELPHIA - Money is so short at Feltonville School of Arts and Sciences, a public middle school here, that a nurse works only three afternoons a week, leaving the principal to oversee the daily medication of 10 children, including a diabetic who needs insulin shots.

As Apprentices in Classroom, Teachers Learn What Works

nytimes.com — OAKLAND, Calif. - Monica DeSantiago wondered how in the world she would get the students to respect her. It was the beginning of her yearlong apprenticeship as a math teacher at Berkley Maynard Academy, a charter school in this diverse city east of San Francisco.

Inaction sets up Washington schools to fail

dispatch.com — SEATTLE - Three years ago, Lakeridge Elementary School, where most pupils come from lower-income families, was remade. A new principal arrived and replaced half the staff, and lengthened the school day and year. Working with a $3 million federal grant, the staff collaborated with the University of Washington to train teachers in new instructional techniques.

Political fighting sets up Washington state schools to fail

dispatch.com — SEATTLE - Because of political fighting between the state and feds, nearly 9 in 10 Washington public schools, including some high-achieving campuses in the state's most moneyed communities, have been relegated to a federal blacklist of failure, requiring them to set aside 20 percent of their federal funding for private tutoring or to transport students to schools not on the failing list.

In Washington State, Political Stand Puts Schools in a Bind

nytimes.com — SEATTLE - Three years ago, Lakeridge Elementary School, where most pupils come from lower-income families, was totally remade. A new principal arrived and replaced half the staff, and she lengthened the school day and year. Working with a $3 million federal grant, the staff collaborated with the University of Washington to train teachers in new instructional techniques.

New Federal Guidelines Aim to Rid Schools of Racial Inequality

nytimes.com — With racial minorities still less likely than white students to have access to rigorous academic classes or experienced and qualified teachers, the Obama administration will announce guidelines on Wednesday to ensure that strong teachers, high-level math and science courses, quality extracurricular programs, and equivalent technology and school facilities are available for all public school students.

Academic Skills on Web Are Tied to Income Level

nytimes.com — Wealthier students tend to perform better on tests of reading comprehension than their poorer peers, a longstanding trend that has been documented amply. But with the Internet having become an indispensable part of daily life, a new study shows that a separate gap has emerged, with lower-income students again lagging more affluent students in their ability to find, evaluate, integrate and communicate the information they find online.

Why Don’t More Men Go Into Teaching?

nytimes.com — AS Tommie Leaders, 22, approached college graduation last spring, his professors told him he would have no trouble getting hired. "You're a guy teaching elementary, " they said. Mr. Leaders, who earned his education degree from the University of Nebraska in June, started teaching fifth grade last month in Council Bluffs, Iowa.
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Oct 24, 2014

I had been wondering about the school that paid teachers $125,000 a year. Some results vox.com/2014/10/24/705… @libbyanelson

Oct 24, 2014

RT @Stcrow: Pres Obama hugs Nina Pham, nurse who recovered from Ebola contracted while treating Dallas patient; Oval Office. pic.twitter.com/uMNodxQ9jT

Oct 24, 2014

World Health Org said they hope to begin trials of Ebola Vaccine in West Africa in December nyti.ms/1rtC0AA

Oct 23, 2014

Dr. Spencer's neighbor: "I’m more concerned about him, especially because he went over there to help people.” about:blank

Oct 23, 2014

"Implying that Ebola is caught as easily as flu or colds would be untrue and inflammatory." nyti.ms/ZCxpFw



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