I am a staff writer@latimes. I write about films, TV, theater and DVDS, specializing in classic Hollywood. I also love animals

French film festival COLCOA, seeing the small picture, adds TV fare

latimes.com — Since its creation in 1996 by the Franco-American Cultural Fund, the French film festival COLCOA has cultivated a loyal following. "Every year we have people coming from all parts of the country," said Francois Truffart, executive producer and artistic director of the festival, which opens its 19th edition Monday at the Directors Guild of America.

Classic Hollywood: Sissy Spacek adjusting to TV's pace in 'Bloodline'

courant.com — Sissy Spacek remembers the kaleidoscope of emotions she felt when she earned her first lead actress Oscar nomination as the tormented telekinetic teen in Brian De Palma's 1976 horror film, "Carrie." "I was so excited when I got nominated," said Spacek. "Then I was struck with terror and fear about what I should do" at the ceremony.

Classic Hollywood: Sissy Spacek adjusting to TV's pace in 'Bloodline'

latimes.com — Sissy Spacek remembers the kaleidoscope of emotions she felt when she earned her first lead actress Oscar nomination as the tormented telekinetic teen in Brian De Palma's 1976 horror film, "Carrie." "I was so excited when I got nominated," said Spacek. "Then I was struck with terror and fear about what I should do" at the ceremony.

'Getting Straight' gets a 45th anniversary screening in L.A.

latimes.com — Just nine days after the 1970 National Guard shootings at Kent State University in Ohio had left four students dead and nine injured during a Vietnam War protest, Columbia Pictures released "Getting Straight," a counterculture comedy-drama exploring campus rebellion, unrest and the sexual revolution.

Classic Hollywood: PBS film explores legacy of 'Giant' in Marfa, Texas

latimes.com — Hollywood invaded the small West Texas town of Marfa 60 years ago this summer to make the epic "Giant," based on Edna Ferber's bestseller chronicling 25 years in the lives of a powerful rancher, his strong-willed, opinionated wife and a surly ranch hand turned oil tycoon.

Vincent D'Onofrio probes souls of 'Broken Horses,' 'Daredevil' characters

latimes.com — Vincent D'Onofrio never had aspirations to be the leading man. He wanted to be a character actor. During the last three decades, he has become just that: one of the most durable and versatile character actors working in film and television, playing a serial killer ("The Cell"), an evil space alien ("Men in Black"), a Sherlock Holmesian police detective ("Law & Order: Criminal Intent") and a pulp fiction writer ("The Whole Wide World").

Alan Alda explores enduring love in 'The Longest Ride'

latimes.com — Alan Alda is discussing enduring love, a subject he knows by heart. Alda, who came to fame as Hawkeye Pierce on the 1972-83 CBS comedy series "MASH," recently celebrated his 58th wedding anniversary. He married his wife, author-photographer Arlene Alda, when he was a struggling actor. They have three grown daughters and eight grandchildren.

Conversation: Candice Bergen follows up on her life in 'A Fine Romance'

latimes.com — Three decades after writing her memoir "Knock Wood," Candice Bergen has penned a follow-up, "A Fine Romance." The 68-year-old Emmy Award-winning daughter of ventriloquist Edgar Bergen discusses with candor, humor and poignancy her unconventional marriage to the late French film director Louis Malle, becoming a mother at age 39 to daughter Chloe, finding success on the 1988-98 CBS sitcom "Murphy Brown," losing Malle to cancer and then finding love and marriage again with New York real-estate developer Marshall Rose.

'Lambert & Stamp' explores the 'mesmerizing' duo who managed the Who

latimes.com — Kit Lambert and Chris Stamp were polar opposites. Lambert was a member of the aristocracy. His father was composer-conductor Constant Lambert. He was educated at Oxford and was fluent in several languages. He was gay, but discreet because homosexuality was illegal in England in the 1960s.

Director Victor Levin's French encounter led to '5 to 7'

latimes.com — Victor Levin, the writer-director of the new romantic film "5 to 7," grew up in suburban New York in a very traditional family. So he couldn't quite wrap his mind around the married couple he met when he was traveling with his then-girlfriend in France in the late 1980s.
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L.A. Times wins Pulitzers for coverage of California drought and television fw.to/qHH2Uqh

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