Nobel laureate. Op-Ed columnist, @nytopinion. Author, “The Return of Depression Economics,” “The Great Unraveling,” “The Age of Diminished Expectations” + more.

Heavy Politics - NYTimes.com

krugman.blogs.nytimes.com — A few days ago Bloomberg had a great story about the politicization of pizza - which is part of the broader pattern in which nutrition and obesity have become deeply partisan. Big Pizza is now an industry as dedicated to the GOP as coal or tobacco.

How Negative Can Rates Go?

krugman.blogs.nytimes.com — We now know that interest rates can, in fact, go negative; those of us who dismissed the possibility by saying that people could simply hold currency were clearly too casual about it. But how low? Evan Soltas is getting some attention with an interesting attempt to find the true lower bound on interest rates; David Keohane cited a similar, more detailed estimate a month ago.

Paul Krugman: Walmart's visible hand

business-standard.com — A few days ago Walmart, America's largest employer, announced that it will raise wages for half a million workers. For many of those workers the gains will be small, but the announcement is nonetheless a very big deal, for two reasons.

Wal-Mart's visible hand: Paul Krugman

oregonlive.com — By Paul Krugman In February, Wal-Mart, America's largest employer, announced that it will raise wages for half a million workers. For many of those workers the gains will be small, but the announcement is nonetheless a very big deal, for two reasons.

Paul Krugman: Wal-Mart’s visible hand

sacbee.com — Retail giant's pay increase shows that low wages are a political choice, and we can and should choose differently.

Larry Kudlow and the Failure of the Chicago School

krugman.blogs.nytimes.com — Jonathan Chait does insults better than almost anyone; in his recent note on Larry Kudlow, he declares that The interesting thing about Kudlow's continuing influence over conservative thought is that he has elevated flamboyant wrongness to a kind of performance art.

The Slippery Slope of Disinflation

krugman.blogs.nytimes.com — Arguments for tight money often rest on claims that inflation, even at low rates, is a slippery slope: say that 2 percent is OK, then people will make the case for 4, then 10, and before you know it we're Weimar.

Walmart’s Visible Hand

nytimes.com — A few days ago Walmart, America's largest employer, announced that it will raise wages for half a million workers. For many of those workers the gains will be small, but the announcement is nonetheless a very big deal, for two reasons.

The Strange Urge to Raise Rates

krugman.blogs.nytimes.com — Monetary policy attracts crazy people like moths to a flame; goldbugs, 100-percent-reserve-banking types, amateur historians who think they know exactly what happened when Diocletian ruled Rome but have no idea what happened in Japan in the last decade.

Empire of the Institute

krugman.blogs.nytimes.com — Not long ago I received a copy of MIT and the Transformation of American Economics, a collection of essays on how American economics became model- and math-oriented after World War II, and of the special role played by the department Paul Samuelson built.
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