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Politics Reporter, The Fix — Washington Post

Writer for The Washington Post's politics blog, The Fix. philip.bump@washpost.com

The story behind the new “Willie Horton”-style ad runing in Nebraska

washingtonpost.com — The National Republican Campaign Committee released an ad on Friday that observers in Nebraska probably expected -- and that people familiar with the history of controversial political advertising probably thought looked familiar. Titled "Nikko," the spot uses images of convicted murderer Nikko Jenkins to criticize state Sen.

The only Election Day countdown clock you will ever need

washingtonpost.com — Election Day is approaching. Which we assume you knew. But it is possible -- not necessarily probable, but possible -- that you don't know precisely how far away Election Day is away in terms of seconds or, more importantly, what that means for key metrics like how many more TV ads can I run.

The American electorate is about to become a lot less white - but also a lot more gray

washingtonpost.com — Normally, political analyses of demographic shifts focus on the United States becoming less white. Over at the Daily Beast, Republican strategist Stuart Stevens raises another important point: It will also become grayer -- i.e. older. The demographic shifts that the country will see over the next few decades includes a surge in people -- a.k.a.

The good news for Mark Begich, Mary Landrieu and Mark Pryor: People like them have survived before

washingtonpost.com — The main reason that the Democratic Party is likely to lose control of the Senate this year is that its incumbents are playing defense in hostile territory. Sens. Mark Pryor (D-Ark.), Mark Begich (D-Alaska) Kay Hagan (D-N.C.) and Mary Landrieu (D-La.)

This White House photo is a time capsule of Oct. 16, 2014

washingtonpost.com — "Hello, can you show me a photograph that, perhaps more than any other, captures this particular moment in American politics and media?" "Sure thing. Look at this. Meanwhile, in front of the White House...

Want to feel better about Ebola? This (massive) chart should do the trick.

washingtonpost.com — Three people in America have contracted the Ebola virus, to the best of our current knowledge. Th e concern that those infections have aroused, however, has vastly outpaced the spread of the sickness within our borders. We wanted to come up with a way to represent the true scale of Ebola in the United States.

Arkansas is spending 40 times as much on campaign ads as California

washingtonpost.com — For all of the attention being paid to this year's Senate races ( did you know that party control might flip? did you did you did you), there's a surprising bit of data in the Center for Public Integrity's ongoing analysis of TV ad spending.

How Twitter tells the story of the 2014 campaign

washingtonpost.com — Twitter, for those who are not yet addicted, is the distributed Associated Press of the 21st century, a news ticker for every person, company, and thing. Since political candidates overlap with at least one of those categories, campaigns have similarly embraced the technology as a way of pushing out news and information (and calls for money and votes) over the 140-character medium.

Chelsea Clinton inspired a lot more ‘Chelseas’ than Malia Obama has inspired ‘Malias’

washingtonpost.com — I will be perfectly honest: The reason I started wondering how often presidents' childrens' names become popular is because I was imagining the kids at school making fun of Malia Obama for her mother's turnip joke. And then I wondered if there were other kids named Malia at the school.

This graph shows exactly why Democrats are worried about November

washingtonpost.com — Over the course of surveying voters for the new Washington Post/ABC News poll previewing the November elections, one anticipated trend appeared: Voting groups that are more likely to support Republicans also indicated that they were more likely to turn out to vote in 20 days time.
More Articles →
Oct 19, 2014

Consensus seems to be "sleep," which, paired with a 16-hour workday, seems right.

Oct 19, 2014

But seriously, before the printing press, what did people do in the evenings?

Oct 19, 2014

A 1905 government report on using things like phrenology to ID the "criminal, pauper, and defective classes." bit.ly/1vzxvti

Oct 19, 2014

This woman has lived in Brooklyn for 100 of the 116 years it has been part of New York City. j.mp/1DqKZdn



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