Freelance writer, dog lover, Coloradan, fan of Mars. Chronicler of night & its inhabitants, from astronomers to bats. Blog: popsci.com/blog-network/e…

The brain’s secret gardeners

spectrumnews.org — Illustration by Julia Yellow The brain of a newborn baby is an overgrown garden. Billions of neurons connect via an unimaginable number of junctions, or synapses, far more than will remain in adulthood. For this thicket of connections to mature into a properly organized adult brain, a group of special immune cells called microglia must get to work.
Feb 03, 2016

RT @Spectrumgo: Great piece by @rboyle31 on microglia as master landscapers of the developing brain: bit.ly/1QGcdDP #autism

Feb 03, 2016

RT @Spectrumgo: Great piece by @rboyle31 on microglia as master landscapers of the developing brain: bit.ly/1QGcdDP #autism

Feb 03, 2016

I stepped away from the stars and into the brain for this piece, my 1st for @Spectrumgo #autism spectrumnews.org/features/deep-…

Show 3 more tweets from Troy Earl Camplin, Virginia Hughes and others...

Mystery supernova could be fast-spinning magnetic star

newscientist.com — A fast-spinning and highly magnetised star core could be the force behind the brightest supernova ever seen. When researchers announced confirmation of the record-breaking stellar explosion ASASSN-15lh last week, they mused that such a star, called a magnetar, wasn't enough to explain the supernova's unusual brightness.

We've found the brightest ever supernova but can't explain it

newscientist.com — The brightest supernova ever seen has been confirmed, but it still has astronomers puzzling over what unknown type of star could have been responsible. Supernovas mark the violent deaths of stars that collapse on themselves and blow up. They are some of the brightest and most energetic objects in the universe.

Big Idea For 2016: Lightbulbs Can Make Us Healthy

popsci.com — There's perhaps no more powerful force in nature than light. It influences everything from our cells to our mood and metabolism. Blue wavelengths cue the brain to produce cortisol to make us alert, while red wavelengths allow the production of melatonin to help us sleep-a cycle that once followed the sun and moon.

Dwarf planet Ceres looks like an asteroid but acts like a comet

newscientist.com — IT'S an invader. Shiny spots and minerals on the surface of Ceres suggest that the asteroid belt's largest object may have been born in the outer solar system, far from its current abode. This also hints that our current classification of comets, asteroids and planets is too simplistic.

im trying to save animals

That Amazing Cancer-Killing "Gene Editing"

popularmechanics.com — ​This is the future of medicine: A baby with an aggressive form of leukemia has been whisked from death's door by genetic engineering. When neither aggressive chemotherapy nor a bone marrow transplant could save Layla Richards, doctors made a last-ditch attempt to cure her with a donor's immune cells that were genetically modified to fight her cancer.
Nov 06, 2015

.@rboyle31 explains everything you need to know about that amazing cancer-beating gene-editing popularmechanics.com/science/health…

Nov 06, 2015

RT @Agmoseman: .@rboyle31 explains everything you need to know about that amazing cancer-beating gene-editing popularmechanics.com/science/health…

How Bats Find Their Way Through The Clutter

popsci.com — There's this scene in one of the greatest movies of the 80s, "The Blues Brothers," that makes me laugh and cringe every time I see it. Jake and Elwood are careening through Chicago, sunglasses on, at 120 MPH, fleeing every representative of Illinois' law enforcement community.

New Corpse-Detection System Finds Where the Bodies Are Buried

popsci.com — Cops searching for hidden graves usually rely on dogs or ground-penetrating radar. Now they have another tool in their arsenal -- a corpsefinder probe, slightly thicker than a human hair, that can quickly and easily detect decaying flesh. Before they go tearing up the ground in search of a body, authorities often want to be sure about what lies beneath.

What Would You Pay To Save Your Life?

popsci.com — If someone offered you a drug that would save your life, what would you be willing to pay for it? Could you even put a number on it? Let's start at $750 per pill. It's a large number, but when you consider its benefit - your health - it certainly seems manageable.
More Articles →
Feb 06, 2016

RT @virginiahughes: the latest research on the fascinating link btwn autism and microglia, the brain's "secret gardeners," by @rboyle31 spectrumnews.org/features/deep-…

Feb 03, 2016

I stepped away from the stars and into the brain for this piece, my 1st for @Spectrumgo #autism spectrumnews.org/features/deep-…

Feb 03, 2016

RT @Spectrumgo: Great piece by @rboyle31 on microglia as master landscapers of the developing brain: bit.ly/1QGcdDP #autism

Jan 19, 2016

RT @Slate: As Zika virus spreads, health officials in Jamaica tell women to avoid pregnancy: slate.me/1nx0s8Z pic.twitter.com/IrkTdkCAlN

Jan 10, 2016

RT @screencrushnews: EXCLUSIVE: Here's a shot of the NBC censor responsible for working the #GoldenGlobes: pic.twitter.com/oAJ7KachFd

Jan 05, 2016

@andersen wait, are you doing a series?? Because I totally will! I will make Mars' case!

Jan 05, 2016

@andersen But that said, no love for Mars? It's my favorite!

Jan 05, 2016

@andersen So good. The mystery you see in the rings is everything I love about astronomy- such profound secrets we can only guess at


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