Professional speaker, award-winning sales blogger, and author of Business Without the Bullsh*t and How To Say It: B2B Selling. http://www.GeoffreyJames.com

10 Great Reasons to Skip Vacation

inc.com — Depending on what you do and who you are, vacation can be way more hassle than it's worth. Here are some cogent reasons to stay at the office: When your team is working hot and heavy on an important project, and customers and investors are breathing down your collective necks, leaving the team to sink or swim is a bad move.

15 Characteristics of Extraordinary Teams (Infographic)

inc.com — A couple of days ago, I posted some unexpected scientific research about teams. By coincidence, I also received an infographic about teamwork from the UK-based insurance firm Unum. Here it is (with my comments following): Anyway, you've probably heard most of these "teamwork" maxims in the past and, while there is no doubt some truth in them, real-life experience says that teams don't always work that smoothly.
Aug 01, 2015

RT @Inc: "Drink the Kool-Aid or you're out!" and other rules for corporate teamwork. @Sales_Source bit.ly/1DhytRF

Aug 01, 2015

New @Inc: 15 Characteristics of Extraordinary Teams (Infographic) bit.ly/1gzfWpN

6 Emotions That Make Customers Buy

inc.com — Customers make purchasing decisions because they have carefully considered a set of good information, right? Wrong. Buying decisions are always the result of a change in the customer's emotional state. While information may help change that emotional state, it's the emotion that's important, not the information.

Why Sales Forecasts Are a Joke

inc.com — I have never seen (nor heard of) a sales forecast that was accurate, except by accident. The reason is simple: the politics of self-interest makes accurate forecasts virtually impossible. Here's how it works inside most firms: Step #1: Top management needs a story to tell investors, and thus asks the sales manager for a forecast.

7 Powerful Books Sheryl Sandberg Wants Women to Read

inc.com — Previous posts have provided the recommended reading lists of Bill Gates, Elon Musk, Steve Jobs, Warren Buffet, Jeff Bezos and Mark Zuckerberg. Now I figure it's time to expand our reading beyond the billionaire boys club. This post consists of books that Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg recommended in a recent New York Times interview.
Jul 31, 2015

New @Inc: 7 Powerful Books Sheryl Sandberg Wants Women to Read bit.ly/1Hc4o0w

Jul 31, 2015

7 Powerful Books Sheryl Sandberg Wants Women to Read: ow.ly/Qm4XJ

3 Ways to Annoy Your Customers

inc.com — Want your prospects and customers to think you're obnoxious? Want to make yourself persona non grata? Here are the most common ways sellers make themselves into nuisances-plus a few thoughts about better ways to work with customers. 1. Ask Scripted Questions For decades, most sales training seminars have been built around "sales scripts" intended to uncover customer needs.

Brand vs. Branding: When Less is More

inc.com — It's a myth that having lots of brands and plenty of branding is good for business. After a certain point, both brands and branding cease to be useful-and, in fact, can be positively toxic. To understand why, though, it's first necessary to differentiate between "brand" and "branding." You'll see why in a minute.

Be Customer-Focused: 4 Basic Tactics

inc.com — Everybody talks about being customer-focused, but few people really know what it means. Here are four basic elements of customer-focus, based upon presentations from four of the smartest people in the sales training business. The more you know about a customers, the better you'll be able to help out.

Don't Let Your Customers Bully You

inc.com — My recent column Top 5 Ways Big Customers Screw With Small Vendors points out that some buyers see sellers-that means you -as scapegoats. Buyers use the fact they needn't work with you on a daily basis as an excuse to vent their frustration by exploding at you.

Write an Executive Summary That Sells

inc.com — The most important part of every sales proposal is the executive summary-but many people in sales get it completely wrong. Some sellers wrongly believe that the executive summary should summarize the contents of the proposal. As a result, they write the executive summary last, after all the information has been gathered into the body of the proposal.
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Aug 02, 2015

5 Common Phrases That Create Failure (and What to Say Instead) #SALES ow.ly/Qm6Xw

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