Food Editor, The New York Times: http://cooking.nytimes.com. #NYTCooking

Pickleback Slaw Recipe - NYT Cooking

cooking.nytimes.com — Those artisanal pickles from the farmers' market sure are expensive, so don't throw out the juice in which they're pickled You can serve the stuff as a shot to accompany a glass of whiskey and a cold beer, as the New York chef Zakary Pelaccio has done, or you can whisk it into the dressing used for coleslaw, as is done here Don't have any

U.S.A. vs. Japan

Tomato-and-Watermelon Salad

cooking.nytimes.com — Summer in a bowl: salty and sweet, with a hint of acidity Make it with the best tomatoes you can find, a cold watermelon, less dressing than you would think and, if you can find it, Bulgarian feta.

The Times Responds to ‘Peacamole’ Tweets

nytimes.com — The Times food editor Sam Sifton reads a selection of Twitter responses to a recipe for guacamole with peas, including one from President Obama.

Guacamole de Frutas

cooking.nytimes.com — Toloache is one of the great treats of the theater district, up there with bumping into Laura Benanti in front of Joe Allen: the chunky guacamole with apple, pear and jalapeño that the chef Julian Medina serves at his marvelous little Mexican joint on 50th Street Just add margaritas.

Our 15 Most Popular Chicken Dishes Right Now

July 4th Recipes Recipes

Our Best Chicken Thigh Recipes

cooking.nytimes.com — Evan Sung for The New York Times Our Best Chicken Thigh Recipes The chicken breast might get all the press, but it's the humble chicken thigh that really delivers in terms of flavor, versatility and economy. Most of these recipes can be made with bone-in or boneless chicken thighs.

A classic: Craig Claiborne’s cheesecake

seattletimes.com — Many recipes for cheesecake have come to The New York Times over the years, but food editor Craig Claiborne's version, first published in 1963, is arguably the most definitive: simple, rich and easily accessorized with ripe fruit or flavorings.

Dry-Rubbed London Broil

cooking.nytimes.com — Here is a cheap beef dinner of uncommon flavor, perfect for serving to a crowd It calls for the process known as indirect grilling, in which you build a fire on one side of your grill and cook on the other, so that the dry-rubbed meat is never in direct contact with flame (If you grill the meat directly, the sugar and spices will burn rather than melt into appetizing darkness.)
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Jul 05, 2015

RT @Mfs2K: Made @SamSifton's Pickleback Slaw for today's barbecue. Was the hit of the party. Thanks Sam! cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/101625… pic.twitter.com/f4zswHF3ou

Jul 05, 2015

Do some cooking today so you won't have to next week after work. #NYTCooking nytimes.com/indexes/2015/0…

Jul 05, 2015

Gas vs. charcoal? Nah, let's grill over MOLTEN LAVA. @nytimes's @emilybhager reports: nyti.ms/1IyOhzW.

Jul 04, 2015

@jackhealyNYT @jessbidgood It's a butter-delivery device, more texture than taste. Bun: APPROVED.

Jul 04, 2015

Jon Pareles on the 1st #GD50 show last night and as always with JP, it's smart and incisive and worth reading now: artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/07/04/gra….

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