Sara Reardon on Muck Rack

Sara Reardon Verified

Washington, DC
Biomedical and Science Policy Reporter, Nature Magazine
As seen in:  New Scientist, Slate

Biomedical research and policy reporter for @NatureNews covering brains, bugs, and @NIH. Recovering molecular biologist, nature lover, music snob. Opinions mine

US government cracks down on clinical-trials reporting

nature.com — Alex Wong/Getty Hiding negative results and harmful side effects that occur in clinical trials would become harder in the United States under regulations proposed on 19 November by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Transparent Brains Reveal Effects of Cocaine and Fear [Video]

nature.com — A technique that makes mouse brains transparent shows how the entire brain responds to cocaine addiction and fear. The findings could uncover new brain circuits involved in drug response. In the technique, known as CLARITY, brains are infused with acrylamide, which forms a matrix in the cells and preserves their structure along with the DNA and proteins inside them.

Transparent brains reveal effects of cocaine and fear

nature.com — A technique that makes mouse brains transparent shows how the entire brain responds to cocaine addiction and fear. The findings could uncover new brain circuits involved in drug response. In the technique, known as CLARITY, brains are infused with acrylamide, which forms a matrix in the cells and preserves their structure along with the DNA and proteins inside them.

Gut-brain link grabs neuroscientists

nature.com — Lester V. Bergman/Corbis Companies selling 'probiotic' foods have long claimed that cultivating the right gut bacteria can benefit mental well-being, but neuroscientists have generally been sceptical. Now there is hard evidence linking conditions such as autism and depression to the gut's microbial residents, known as the microbiome.

Human brainwaves light up mouse genes

nature.com — Ref. 1 A system that uses brain activity to switch on genes with light could give new meaning to the phrase 'mind over matter'. The set-up, which was tested in mice, might one day allow human patients to pre-empt pain or seizures by recognizing brain activity that signals the onset of these phenomena and intervening to stop them.

Alzheimer's drug sneaks through blood-brain barrier

nature.com — Delivering medications to the brain could become easier, thanks to molecules that can escort drugs through the notoriously impervious sheath that separates blood vessels from neurons. In a proof-of-concept study in monkeys, biologists used the system to reduce levels of the protein amyloid-β, which accumulates in the brain plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease.

Lobbying sways NIH grants

nature.com — Douglas Graham/Roll Call/Getty Advocates for patients with rare diseases spend millions of dollars lobbying the US Congress each year - and it is money well spent, an economic analysis has found. Between 1998 and 2008, such efforts helped to increase new funding for rare-disease programmes by 3-15% each year at the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), according to a report to be published in Management Science ( D.

‘Forgotten’ NIH smallpox virus languishes on death row

nature.com — Mehau Kulyk/SPL/Corbis Six vials of smallpox virus discovered at the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, in June are marked for death by autoclave - yet they linger in a high-security freezer.

US research ethics agency upholds decision on informed consent

blogs.nature.com — United States regulators are standing by their decision that parents were not properly informed of the risks of a clinical trial in which premature babies received different levels of oxygen supplementation. From 2005-2009, the Surfactant, Positive Pressure, and Oxygenation Randomized Trial (SUPPORT) trial randomly assigned 1,316 premature babies to receive one of two levels of oxygen supplementation in an effort to test which level was best.

Viral-research moratorium called too broad

nature.com — Alfred Pasieka/SPL US researchers are worried that a temporary government ban on 'gain-of-function' experiments that boost the infectious properties of dangerous viruses may also cover less-extreme forms of the work that are crucial to protecting public health.
More Articles →
Nov 20, 2014

RT @TheBradBlog: First my grandma was killed by a death panel and I did nothing. Then I had to marry a gay guy. Now I must speak only Spanish?! #Impeach

Nov 19, 2014

RT @loewenchris: Can't the polar bears just move somewhere colder if we're worried about Global Warming? #DonLemonReporting

Nov 19, 2014

NIH and FDA propose crackdown on hidden clinical trial results, but some worry the rules are too lax. @Naturenews nature.com/news/us-govern…

Nov 17, 2014

Digging the music at the #SfN14 psychopharmacology social: Eric Clapton's "Cocaine"



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