Sean Gallagher on Muck Rack

Sean Gallagher Verified

MD, USA
IT Editor — Ars Technica
Covers:  open source, arduino, web development, social networks, car technology, software, defense industry, internet, technology, technology of business, cyberwarfare, cybersecurity, biotech, internet culture, big data, business of technology, hardware hacking, internet of things, networks, information technology, enterprise technology, google, open government
Doesn't Cover: funding rounds

IT editor at Ars Technica, covering convergence of technology with defense, security, government and society. Plus, sarcasm. For PGP: t.co/Vf24amBARs

Ars Technica's IT Editor, overseeing enterprise and general information technology coverage. Over 20 years of tech journalism experience, from test lab to news beats. Winner of two American Society of Business Publication Editors awards and one Neal award. Past positions include Managing Editor, InformationWeek Labs; Technology Editor, Baseline Magazine; Editor-in-Chief of Defense Systems.

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Baaad attitude: Prank-messaging friends (and enemies) with Goat Attack [Updated]

Baaad attitude: Prank-messaging friends (and enemies) with Goat Attack [Updated]

American Association of Business Publication Editors National Gold Award

2003 - Case History
With Larry Barrett, for McBusted—a case study of the failure of McDonalds' attempt to computerize the entire business process of its franchisees right down to how often the fryer oil was changed.

Jesse H. Neal Award

2003 - Best recurring feature

What was your first job as a journalist?

As a freelancer, I wrote about trade finance. My first full-time gig was as assistant editor for a DC computer newspaper.

How is social media changing news?

It's an ongoing open conversation with sources and readers. It creates transparency.

How do you prefer to be pitched on stories?

We don't take pitched stories very often. I prefer PR people understand Ars before wildly pitching, or I may never have time to respond.

As US drops “cyber bombs,” ISIS retools its own cyber army

arstechnica.com — The Islamic State has been deft in its use of the Internet as a communications tool. ISIS has long leveraged social media to spreadpropaganda and even coordinate targets for attacks, using an ever-shifting collection of social media accounts for recruitment and even to call for attacks on individuals ISIS leaders have designated as enemies.

Blame the victim: Report shows fifth of data breaches caused by “miscellaneous errors”

arstechnica.co.uk — The number of reported breaches of organizations' data has been growing hyperbolically over the past few years, based on data in Verizon's 2016 Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR). And a major reason for that is that many organizations are still doing security like they were decades ago.

Blame the victim: Report shows fifth of breaches caused by “miscellaneous errors”

arstechnica.com — The number of reported breaches of organizations' data has been growing hyperbolically over the past few years, based on data in Verizon's 2016 Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR). And a major reason for that is that many organizations are still doing security like they were decades ago.

German nuclear plant’s fuel rod system swarming with old malware

arstechnica.com — A nuclear power plant 75 miles from Munich has been harboring malware-including remote-access trojans and file-stealing malware-on the computer system that is used to monitor the plant's fuel rods. Fortunately, as Reuters reported, the computer isn't connected to the Internet, and the malware was never able to be activated.

JLENS program’s “blimp gone wild” prompts House to slash funding

arstechnica.com — Aerostat goes to ground in Moreland Township, PA, after loss of helium; recovery underway. The Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor (JLENS) system program has been savaged by the House Armed Services Committee in its markup of the Defense Department's 2017 budget.

“Drone” that hit British Airways jet was likely a plastic bag

arstechnica.com — Recent reports of an unidentified flying object striking a British Airways fligh t at London's Heathrow Airport spurred a wave of fear over drones interfering with commercial aircraft. But now it appears the object may have only been a floating plastic bag, according to British transport minister Robert Goodwill.

“Nuclear” exploit kit service cashes in on demand from ransomware rings

arstechnica.co.uk — Security researchers at Cisco Talos and Check Point have published reports detailing the inner workings of Nuclear, an "exploit kit" Web service that deployed malware onto victims' computers through malicious websites. While a significant percentage of Nuclear's infrastructure has been recently disrupted, the exploit kit is still operating-and looks to be a major contributor to the current crypto-ransomware epidemic.

“Nuclear” exploit kit service cashes in on demand from cryptoransomware rings

arstechnica.com — Security researchers at Cisco Talos and Check Point have published reports detailing the inner workings of Nuclear, an "exploit kit" Web service that deployed malware onto victims' computers through malicious websites. While a significant percentage of Nuclear's infrastructure has been recently disrupted, the exploit kit is still operating-and looks to be a major contributor to the current crypto-ransomware epidemic.

Guess what? URL shorteners short-circuit cloud security

arstechnica.co.uk — Two security researchers have published research exposing the potential privacy problems connected to using Web address shortening services. When used to share data protected by credentials included in the Web address associated with the content, these services could allow an attacker to gain access to data simply by searching through the entire address space for a URL-shortening service in search of content, because of how predictable and short those addresses are.

Flashback: Declassified 1970 DOD cybersecurity document still relevant

arstechnica.com — The National Security Archives at George Washington University has just added a classic text of computer security to its "Cyber Vault" project-the original version of what came to be known as the "Ware Report," a document published by the predecessor to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency in February 1970.
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Apr 29, 2016

@shirlb94 @DanRodricks @arstechnica @RoughlySpeaking I mentioned we still don't get a receipt, so no way to know if vote was counted right.

Apr 29, 2016

@cnalbanese this guy had medical care, a family watching him; compared to how the poor with mental illness are treated in US, he's "lucky" 🙁

Apr 28, 2016

@jumbonaoki watching the video of the whole thing, while I understand why the police shot him, some deescalation would have been nice...

Apr 28, 2016

@jumbonaoki yes. It says a lot about how we handle mental health

Apr 28, 2016

@robpegoraro he's from Howard County, apparently. Wanted to get a video on TV. I am guessing he's a Trump supporter.

Apr 28, 2016

Just an average day. A guy in a hedgehog onsie with a fake bomb vest made of chocolate bars a few blocks away screws up my work schedule.Just an average day. A guy in a hedgehog onsie with a fake bomb vest made of chocolate bars a few blocks away screws up my work schedule.

Apr 28, 2016

13 percent of Kentucky kids have at least 1 parent in prison. twitter.com/newshour/statu…

Apr 28, 2016

My colleague @SciGuySpace explains why SpaceX's plan to Land a Dragon capsule on Mars is huge arstechnica.com/science/2016/0…

Apr 28, 2016

Unfortunate photo alignment of the day, or subtle message about Baltimore's Democratic mayoral candidate pic.twitter.com/E0hbA8V2uu


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