Sean Gallagher on Muck Rack

Sean Gallagher Verified

MD, USA
IT Editor — Ars Technica
As seen in:  Ars Technica
Covers:  open source, arduino, web development, social networks, car technology, software, defense industry, internet, technology, technology of business, cyberwarfare, cybersecurity, biotech, internet culture, big data, business of technology, hardware hacking, internet of things, networks, information technology, enterprise technology, google, open government
Doesn't Cover: funding rounds

IT editor at Ars Technica. Ex-sysadmin, ex-director of IT strategy, ex-Navy. Currently planning Arduino robot uprising. Posts are my own, not my employer's.

Sean Gallagher's Biography

Ars Technica's IT Editor, overseeing enterprise and general information technology coverage. Over 20 years of tech journalism experience, from test lab to news beats. Winner of two American Society of Business Publication Editors awards and one Neal award. Past positions include Managing Editor, InformationWeek Labs; Technology Editor, Baseline Magazine; Editor-in-Chief of Defense Systems.

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American Association of Business Publication Editors National Gold Award

2003 - Case History
With Larry Barrett, for McBusted—a case study of the failure of McDonalds' attempt to computerize the entire business process of its franchisees right down to how often the fryer oil was changed.

What was your first job as a journalist?

As a freelancer, I wrote about trade finance. My first full-time gig was as assistant editor for a DC computer newspaper.

How is social media changing news?

It's an ongoing open conversation with sources and readers. It creates transparency.

How do you prefer to be pitched on stories?

We don't take pitched stories very often. I prefer PR people understand Ars before wildly pitching, or I may never have time to respond.

Pao vs. Kleiner Perkins

Facebook tests laser-equipped drones, but they come in peace

arstechnica.com — Facebook and Google have both gotten into the aircraft business-or at least, the unmanned aircraft business-in their efforts to blanket the planet with wireless Internet access. And yesterday, at Facebook's F8 conference, Facebook Chief Technology Officer Mike Schroepfer said that the company had conducted its first successful tests of its drone-based Internet backbone, and is preparing to move onto the next phase.

A $50 device is breaking North Korean government’s grip on media

arstechnica.com — When a North Korean defector and the Human Rights Foundation planned to distribute Sony Pictures' The Interview to North Korea via balloon air-drops of DVDs and USB sticks late last year, they knew there was a good chance that the movie would be seen by at least some of the secretive country's citizens.

Liveblog (12p EST, Friday): Robots, smart factories, and the Internet of… stuff

arstechnica.com — View all... It's been a few weeks since I got back from my road trip to California and upstate New York, but I've spent much of the last month diving into how different industries are using that stuff people label the "Internet of Things."

Gallery: the bicoastal industrial tech labs road show (with robots!)

arstechnica.com — Two labs, two coasts, two climates. My tour of GE's Global Research operations involved in developing what the company calls the "Industrial Internet" took me to places a bit less exotic than Shanghai and Munich.

Coast to coast, climate to climate, present to past

arstechnica.com — With Ars sending writers around the globe to visit GE research centers, we wanted our readers to share in with some of the experiences we're having during these travels. These blog posts are meant to convey some highlights rather than being an exhaustive account of our trip.

Chromium team reverses course, will adopt IE’s merged mouse, touch APIs

Augmented reality gets to work-and gets past the “Glassholes”

arstechnica.com — View all... Augmented reality (AR) is a technology that has been on the cusp of becoming the next big thing for over 20 years. But the technology-the projection of data or digital imagery over real-world objects-has largely remained the stuff of fighter cockpits at the high end, and of mobile games and art projects on the low.

Now there’s a secure boot add-on for Raspberry Pi. Oh, yay?

arstechnica.com — Raspberry Pi, the low-cost ARM-based system on a board, has gotten lots of attention from hardware hackers and people experimenting with embedded systems. Aside from various intelligence agencies building computing clusters out of them, Raspberry Pi boards have become an increasingly popular part of prototyping network-integrated industrial systems-that Internet of Things that people keep talking about.

Hell is an airport sports bar in Philadelphia

arstechnica.com — With Ars sending writers around the globe to visit GE research centers, we wanted our readers to share in with some of the experiences we're having during these travels. These blog posts are meant to convey some highlights rather than being an exhaustive account of our trip.
More Articles →
Mar 28, 2015

RT @TheTweetOfGod: Being gay isn’t a choice, but living in Indiana is.

Mar 27, 2015

After a failed vehicular rescue mission, there's nothing left to do but...order a Sazerac pic.twitter.com/tPYVsZFHNN

Mar 27, 2015

In case you were wondering: minivans do not make good off-road vehicles.

Mar 27, 2015

IMs we all love getting: 2:25 daaaaad\ 2:26 my car is stuck pic.twitter.com/GyrWdnUoLc

Mar 27, 2015

Facebook tests laser-equipped drones, but they come in peace ars.to/1MbJZ4F An internet backbone of drones.



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