Sean Gallagher on Muck Rack

Sean Gallagher Verified

MD, USA
IT Editor — Ars Technica
Covers:  open source, arduino, web development, social networks, car technology, software, defense industry, internet, technology, technology of business, cyberwarfare, cybersecurity, biotech, internet culture, big data, business of technology, hardware hacking, internet of things, networks, information technology, enterprise technology, google, open government
Doesn't Cover: funding rounds

IT editor at Ars Technica, covering convergence of technology with defense, security, government and society. Plus, sarcasm. For PGP: https://t.co/Vf24amBARs

Sean Gallagher's Biography

Ars Technica's IT Editor, overseeing enterprise and general information technology coverage. Over 20 years of tech journalism experience, from test lab to news beats. Winner of two American Society of Business Publication Editors awards and one Neal award. Past positions include Managing Editor, InformationWeek Labs; Technology Editor, Baseline Magazine; Editor-in-Chief of Defense Systems.

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Baaad attitude: Prank-messaging friends (and enemies) with Goat Attack [Updated]

Baaad attitude: Prank-messaging friends (and enemies) with Goat Attack [Updated]

American Association of Business Publication Editors National Gold Award

2003 - Case History
With Larry Barrett, for McBusted—a case study of the failure of McDonalds' attempt to computerize the entire business process of its franchisees right down to how often the fryer oil was changed.

Jesse H. Neal Award

2003 - Best recurring feature

What was your first job as a journalist?

As a freelancer, I wrote about trade finance. My first full-time gig was as assistant editor for a DC computer newspaper.

How is social media changing news?

It's an ongoing open conversation with sources and readers. It creates transparency.

How do you prefer to be pitched on stories?

We don't take pitched stories very often. I prefer PR people understand Ars before wildly pitching, or I may never have time to respond.

DOD aims to back up underarmed fighters with networked “arsenal planes”

arstechnica.com — The Air Force has a problem. While it bets its future on the stealth of the F-22 and F-35 fighters, that stealth has come at a cost: reduced weapon loads. To be stealthy, the aircraft both have to carry all of their weapons in internal bays, significantly limiting how many bombs and missiles they can carry to strike at targets on the surface and defend themselves from other fighters.
Feb 08, 2016

RT @arstechnica: DOD aims to back up underarmed fighters with networked “arsenal planes” arstechnica.com/information-te… by @thepacketrat

Feb 08, 2016

Guess what DOD is planning to use to fix the F-35's limited weapons capacity. Hint below. arstechnica.com/information-te… pic.twitter.com/9IZ08jM7xE

FAA-industry group partnership: Don’t fly drones at Super Bowl

arstechnica.com — Hey, all you newly minted unmanned air vehicle enthusiasts out there (and especially those of you in the San Francisco Bay area)! The Know Before You Fly campaign has an important message for you: don't bring (or fly) your drone to Super Bowl 50.

A-10 to fly until 2022 as DOD test chief warns against F-35 “block buy”

arstechnica.com — In the Department of Defense's budget request for 2017, the Air Force has conceded what to many has been obvious-that the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter will not be ready to take the place of the A-10 Thunderbolt II (also known as the "Warthog") in close air support missions any time soon.
Feb 04, 2016

A-10 to fly until 2022 as DOD test chief warns against F-35 “block buy” arstechnica.com/information-te…

North Korea plans to try again to orbit satellite (and test ICBM tech)

arstechnica.com — Watch the skies. In an alert filed with the United Nations' International Maritime Organization, the government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (otherwise known as North Korea) announced plans to launch a satellite sometime in February. The nation also provided warnings for the areas where its boost stages might plummet back to the surface.
Feb 03, 2016

North Korea plans to try again to orbit satellite (and test ICBM tech) arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/0…

Feb 03, 2016

Japan says it will shoot down N Korean satellite launch if it gets too close. arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/0…

Feb 03, 2016

Norks preparing a satellite launch, Japan threatens to shoot rocket down if strays too close arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/0… pic.twitter.com/YAt5oSAcHp

Particle’s Electron is a “cellular Arduino” with a global data plan

arstechnica.com — Particle, a company that makes development kits for wireless Internet of Things applications- formerly known as Spark Devices -is preparing to ship a new board-based computer that will allow developers to use Arduino code to build mobile wireless devices based on GSM cellular connections.
Feb 02, 2016

Particle’s Electron is a “cellular Arduino” with a global data plan arstechnica.com/information-te…

DOD running short of smart bombs in ISIS campaign

arstechnica.com — If you're wondering how much the war against the Islamic State is costing the US and why the Obama administration isn't ramping up its bombing campaign even more, consider this fact: from August 2014 to December 2015, the US military dropped $1.3 billion in smart bombs and other guided munitions on ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria, with air operations costing an average of about $11.2 million per day.

State Department slaps “top secret” on 22 e-mails found on Clinton’s server

arstechnica.com — The State Department has declared 22 of the e-mails stored on former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's personal mail server to contain information classified as "top secret." In some cases, those e-mails were related to "special access programs"-the highest level of classification for government secrets, reserved for protected intelligence and other information kept closely protected because of its sensitivity.
Feb 01, 2016

RT @arstechnica: State Department slaps “top secret” on 22 e-mails found on Clinton’s server arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20… by @thepacketrat

Iranian drone flies straight over US carrier in Persian Gulf and takes pics

arstechnica.com — Today, Iran's IRNA news agency broadcast video apparently taken from an Iranian Revolutionary Guard unmanned aircraft as it flew directly over an American aircraft carrier operating in the Persian Gulf. The US Navy has confirmed that an Iranian drone flew "directly over" the USS Harry S.
Jan 29, 2016

The Truman Show: Iranian drone flies straight over US carrier in Persian Gulf and takes pics arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20…

Jan 30, 2016

Iranian drone flies straight over US carrier in Persian Gulf and takes pics arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20…

NSA, GCHQ used open source software to spy on Israeli, Syrian drones

arstechnica.com — Documents provided to The Intercept by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden show new evidence of a long-running surveillance campaign against drones flown by the Israelis, Syrians, and other nations in the region. The operation by the United Kingdom's GCHQ signals intelligence organization, with the assistance of the NSA, intercepted scrambled analog video feeds from remotely-piloted aircraft and tracked the movement of drones.
Jan 29, 2016

NSA, GCHQ used open source software to spy on Israeli, Syrian drones arstechnica.com/information-te…

Jan 29, 2016

RT @schestowitz: "GCHQ [crackers] used Image Magick (an open source image manipulation tool) and other open source software" to crack arstechnica.com/information-te…

Jan 30, 2016

NSA, GCHQ used open source software to spy on Israeli, Syrian drones | Ars Technica ow.ly/XJeAX

F-35 software overrun with bugs, DoD testing chief warns

arstechnica.co.uk — The F-35's flight plan appears to have delays written all over it. A previously unreleased memo from Michael Gilmore, the Department of Defense's director for Operational Test and Evaluation (OT&E), details a list of problems that will likely hold up the testing of the final configuration of the aircraft-and will mean the "Block 2B" aircraft now being delivered to the Marine Corps soon will continue to be full of software bugs for years to come.
More Articles →
Feb 08, 2016

Guess what DOD is planning to use to fix the F-35's limited weapons capacity. Hint below. arstechnica.com/information-te… pic.twitter.com/9IZ08jM7xE

Feb 07, 2016

I wonder how much Peyton will get paid from that Budweiser reference.

Feb 07, 2016

Hmmm. Coldplay halftime show or the Man From Uncle marathon on. Decades? *Switches to Solo and Kuryakin*

Feb 06, 2016

I am not even going to touch this because of my white male privilege. But. twitter.com/ebruenig/statu…


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