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How the Grammys learned to be relevant - and leave their Bob Newhart moment in the past

latimes.com — It feels odd to congratulate an awards ceremony that is already an exercise in self-congratulation. It's a bit like saying, "Thank you for cashing the check I sent you!" But the 58th Grammy Awards deserve applause, no matter which musicians take home Grammys on Monday night.

Why Don’t I Like Coldplay? An Investigation

newyorker.com — It's hard to deal with vexingly adequate music. In 2008, I ended up somewhere beyond vexed after witnessing an evening of Chris Martin foofing about and dispensing false modesty like it was a donation to the Red Cross.
Feb 07, 2016

I just checked @newyorker traffic, and this piece just got a huge boost from Google search. newyorker.com/culture/sasha-…

Feb 07, 2016

RT @nxthompson: I just checked @newyorker traffic, and this piece just got a huge boost from Google search. newyorker.com/culture/sasha-…

Feb 07, 2016

RT @nxthompson: I just checked @newyorker traffic, and this piece just got a huge boost from Google search. newyorker.com/culture/sasha-…

Feb 07, 2016

RT @nxthompson: I just checked @newyorker traffic, and this piece just got a huge boost from Google search. newyorker.com/culture/sasha-…

Feb 07, 2016

RT @nxthompson: I just checked @newyorker traffic, and this piece just got a huge boost from Google search. newyorker.com/culture/sasha-…

Show 16 more tweets from Gianluca Mezzofiore, Ariana Tobin and others...

When citizenship can be bought and sold: Atossa Araxia Abrahamian talks to Sasha Frere-Jones

thestate.com — M.I.A.'s single, "Borders," isn't the official theme song for journalist Atossa Araxia Abrahamian's nonfiction debut, "The Cosmopolites" (Columbia Global Reports: 162 pp., $12.99 paper), but we can pretend it is. In the first verse, M.I.A. asks, "Borders - what's up with that?" "The Cosmopolites" is one answer.

'Why the Mountains Are Black' aims to show music as a 'tool for survival'

latimes.com — In summer 2014, four writers and one record collector were sitting in a room in Faber, Va. The record collector, an adept and passionate scholar, was Chris King . He had been playing 78s from his collection, which he keeps in plain brown sleeves that are not marked.
Jan 28, 2016

On Chris King, Greek village music, zournas, early ravers and suffering, featuring @amandapetrusich and @harikunzru. lat.ms/1ZWxsni

Jan 29, 2016

Reissued, with more bass, Chris King, @harikunzru, @amandapetrusich + I go into the heart of Greece, via Faber, VA. lat.ms/1PnXcYf

When citizenship can be bought and sold: Atossa Araxia Abrahamian talks to Sasha Frere-Jones

ledger-enquirer.com — M.I.A.'s single, "Borders," isn't the official theme song for journalist Atossa Araxia Abrahamian's nonfiction debut, "The Cosmopolites" (Columbia Global Reports: 162 pp., $12.99 paper), but we can pretend it is. In the first verse, M.I.A. asks, "Borders - what's up with that?" "The Cosmopolites" is one answer.

When citizenship can be bought and sold: Atossa Araxia Abrahamian talks to Sasha Frere-Jones

macon.com — M.I.A.'s single, "Borders," isn't the official theme song for journalist Atossa Araxia Abrahamian's nonfiction debut, "The Cosmopolites" (Columbia Global Reports: 162 pp., $12.99 paper), but we can pretend it is. In the first verse, M.I.A. asks, "Borders - what's up with that?" "The Cosmopolites" is one answer.

When citizenship can be bought and sold: Atossa Araxia Abrahamian talks to Sasha Frere-Jones

newsobserver.com — M.I.A.'s single, "Borders," isn't the official theme song for journalist Atossa Araxia Abrahamian's nonfiction debut, "The Cosmopolites" (Columbia Global Reports: 162 pp., $12.99 paper), but we can pretend it is. In the first verse, M.I.A. asks, "Borders - what's up with that?" "The Cosmopolites" is one answer.

When citizenship can be bought and sold: Atossa Araxia Abrahamian talks to Sasha Frere-Jones

heraldonline.com — M.I.A.'s single, "Borders," isn't the official theme song for journalist Atossa Araxia Abrahamian's nonfiction debut, "The Cosmopolites" (Columbia Global Reports: 162 pp., $12.99 paper), but we can pretend it is. In the first verse, M.I.A. asks, "Borders - what's up with that?" "The Cosmopolites" is one answer.

Teenage Jesus and the Jerks, Ork Records CD sets are time capsules of '70s punk and more

latimes.com — "Teenage Jesus and the Jerks: Live 1977-1979" contains 29 songs recorded in the mid-'70s. The music sounds like next week. ("Baby Doll" could easily be on the new Savages album, "Adore Life," give or take a few choices.) These recordings were not available until now.
Jan 24, 2016

Lydia Lunch, Television, Ork, and a NYC that might have existed. (NB: Bowie did like Mars, the band.) lat.ms/1Sc4Wxf

Jan 26, 2016

RT @sfj: Lydia Lunch, Television, Ork, and a NYC that might have existed. (NB: Bowie did like Mars, the band.) lat.ms/1Sc4Wxf

LOVING THE ALIEN

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Feb 12, 2016

Pablo means Paul in Spanish. "Swish" is a basketball term. Madison Square Garden is home of the New York Knicks. pic.twitter.com/4V3GcpP0H8

Feb 12, 2016

For edgy rhyme explainers, I go to @kanyewest, because saying stuff is the new not saying stuff anyway #beanietalk pic.twitter.com/ccWpLCynOm

Feb 12, 2016

RT @juderogers: 76 going on 16: the amazing, humble, funny, Bowie-loving @mavisstaples, by me, for @guardianmusic. God, she ruled. theguardian.com/music/2016/feb…

Feb 12, 2016

also did you read about the rise in shark attacks I mean rewind selector amirite pic.twitter.com/hb5Ar0j2Mh

Feb 12, 2016

Ye, I've forgotten how it felt before the world fell at our feet pic.twitter.com/jROylF3kOw

Feb 11, 2016

Not sure I will like the merch "Pablo" as much this live rip with the email sounds and chatter maybe this is kinda Kanye's "Don't Look Back"


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