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Bjorn Carey

Menlo Park, California
As seen in:  Popular Science, LiveScience

Science Information Officer at Stanford University. Views are my own.

Grippy not sticky: Stanford engineers debut an incredibly adhesive material that doesn't get stuck

news.stanford.edu — A material inspired by the unique physics of geckos' fingertips could allow robotic hands to grip nearly any type of object without applying excessive pressure. Biomimetic Dexterous Manipulation Laboratory A material inspired by the unique physics of gecko fingertips could allow robotic hands to grip nearly any type of object without applying excessive pressure. A promising new adhesive material was born out of a scrap.

TEDxStanford presenters describe turning points and opportunities

news.stanford.edu — From complex discussions concerning modern racism, climate change and the aerodynamics of birds to thought-provoking performances of classical music, the fourth annual TEDxStanford conference on Sunday was a rich experience for all. TEDxStanford has become one of the hottest tickets on campus.

Stanford biologists discover that large whales have nerves that stretch like bungee cords

Blue whales lack the ability to avoid cargo ships, says Stanford biologist

news.stanford.edu — As the largest animals in the ocean, blue whales have not evolved defensive behaviors. New research by Stanford biologist Jeremy Goldbogen suggests this might explain why the whales are so prone to ship collisions.

Stanford and UC Berkeley partner on NASA's new effort to detect life on other planets

news.stanford.edu — A new interdisciplinary research program from NASA brings together an interdisciplinary team of scientists, including Stanford's Bruce Macintosh, to devise new technologies and techniques for detecting life on exoplanets. NASA illustration The study of exoplanets - planets around other stars - is a relatively new field, but planet-hunting efforts have been prolific.

Stanford engineers devise optical method for producing high-res, 3-D images of nanoscale objects

news.stanford.edu — The technique, called cathodoluminescence tomography, could assist in the development of high-efficiency solar cells and LEDS, or improve the way biological systems are visualized. Dionne Group Engineers at Stanford and the FOM Institute AMOLF, in the Netherlands, have developed a way to visualize the optical properties of objects that are thousands of times smaller than a grain of sand, in 3-D and with nanometer-scale resolution.

Ants' intruder defense strategy could lead to better email spam filters, Stanford biologist finds

news.stanford.edu — Biology Professor Deborah M. Gordon presents a model suggesting that the human immune system and ants use similar distributed defense strategies to fight off intruders. Adapting this technique could yield stronger email spam filters. Katherine Dektar To kill spam, email filters might need to act a bit more like ants.

Stanford engineer helps crack mystery of bird flight

news.stanford.edu — It has taken more than a million fine samples of aerodynamic force and airflow combined to determine what makes a hummingbird's wings so adept at hovering. The team led by David Lentink, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford, believes that the results could have significant impacts in both aerodynamic research and in advancing bio-inspired designs of drones and other aircraft.

Stanford biologists show how the evolution of physical traits can influence behavior

news.stanford.edu — Fernald Lab For many male African cichlid fish, the best way to attract a mate is to build a really nice pit or sand castle on a lake bottom. And thus the best way to study evolution's effect on behavior might be to study why the fish build these structures, known collectively as bowers.

Scientists shrink ants to study mechanisms that control DNA expression

news.stanford.edu — Video by Kurt Hickman In the pages of Marvel comic books, Ant-Man manipulates fictional subatomic particles in order to shrink and fight crime as one of Earth's mightiest heroes. In a real lab, biologists from Stanford and McGill universities have now achieved similar shrinking results by manipulating ants' DNA.
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