Bjorn Carey on Muck Rack

Bjorn Carey

Menlo Park, California

Science Information Officer at Stanford University. Views are my own.

Stanford engineers find secret to steady drone cameras in swans

news.stanford.edu — Whooper swans stabilize their head with a complex neck that's tuned like a car suspension, Stanford engineers have learned. The finding has influenced their design of a camera suspension system that could allow drones to record steadier video.

To Better Teach Physics, Let Students Decide

theepochtimes.com — Encouraging students to repeatedly make decisions about data collected during introductory lab courses improves their critical thinking skills, report physicists. Introductory labs are often seen as primarily "cookbook" exercises in which students simply follow instructions to confirm results given in their textbooks, while learning little.

Stanford research shows how to improve science students' critical thinking

news.stanford.edu — Physicists at the University of British Columbia and Stanford have found that encouraging students to repeatedly make decisions about data collected during introductory lab courses improves their critical thinking skills. Imagedb.com / Shutterstock Introductory lab courses are ubiquitous in science education, but there has been little evidence of how or whether they contribute to learning.
Aug 20, 2015

RT @sci_journalism: Stanford research shows how to improve students' critical thinking about scientific evidence stanford.io/1Jra1zG

Aug 20, 2015

RT @sci_journalism: Stanford research shows how to improve students' critical thinking about scientific evidence stanford.io/1Jra1zG

Astronomers discover 'young Jupiter' exoplanet

news.stanford.edu — The first planet detected by the Gemini Planet Imager is 100 light-years away but shares many of the characteristics of an early Jupiter. Stanford physics Professor Bruce Macintosh, the lead investigator on the instrument, explains how this planet could help us understand how solar systems form.

Stanford scientists rescue genetic material from formaldehyde

news.stanford.edu — Formaldehyde is excellent for preserving cellular structures, but it makes it difficult to pull genetic information from tissue samples. Eric Kool and colleagues have developed a catalyst that saves RNA, which could lead to better patient outcomes. AkeSak/ Shutterstock Each year, millions of tissue samples are collected from cancer patients and preserved in formaldehyde.

NFL commissioner steps into virtual reality at Stanford

news.stanford.edu — NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell dons a headset to explore virtual football in the Virtual Human Interaction Lab run by Jeremy Bailenson, left, on Thursday. (Photo: Tamer Shabani) During a visit to Jeremy Bailenson's Virtual Human Interaction Lab at Stanford, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell learned how virtual experiences could improve training and officiating, and also teach players empathy on a variety of social issues.
Aug 11, 2015

RT @scATX: if any sports media wants to, you know, just like fly me to Stanford to profile this, I'd consider doing that maybe news.stanford.edu/news/2015/july…

Aug 12, 2015

There are other ways. "The league could address domestic violence by putting players in the victim's shoes" via VR. news.stanford.edu/news/2015/july…

football helmet tests may not account for concussion-prone actions

news.stanford.edu — Mounting evidence suggests that concussions in football are caused by the sudden rotation of the skull. David Camarillo's lab at Stanford has evidence that suggests current football helmet tests don't account for these movements. L.A. Cicero When modern football helmets were introduced, they all but eliminated traumatic skull fractures caused by blunt force impacts.

Study of Stanford student-athletes provides new insights into injury impacts

news.stanford.edu — By tracking athletes' health with electronic medical records, Stanford researchers deliver a more comprehensive picture of the lingering effects of certain injuries. Andrey Popov/ Shutterstock Before any of the more than 12 million student athletes in the United States are allowed to kick, throw or hit a ball, they must fill out several pages of health forms, known as pre-participation evaluations.
Jul 01, 2015

RT @Stanford: Stanford physicians tracked student athletes for three years to gain insights into the lingering effects of injuries: stanford.io/1NtAUkt

Stanford high-speed video reveals how lovebirds keep a clear line of sight during acrobatic flight

news.stanford.edu — Lovebirds turn their heads at record speeds to maneuver through densely crowded airspace. Stanford's David Lentink says this strategy could be applied to drone cameras to improve visual systems. Courtesy Lentink Lab High-speed video reveals how lovebirds keep a clear line of sight during acrobatic flight.

Stanford engineering students teach autonomous cars to avoid obstacles

news.stanford.edu — The best way to survive a car accident is to avoid collisions in the first place. Professor Chris Gerdes' engineering students are developing algorithms and pop-up obstacles that could lead to safe autonomous driving. Video by Kurt Hickman Stanford engineering students have been testing an obstacle-avoidance algorithm for autonomous vehicles, using a pop-up obstacle they rigged up from a tablecloth and a leaf blower.
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