News about news

This morning, Dennis K. Berman said, “There are roughly 50,000 words in today's Wall Street Journal. None are more amazing than these 96.” For a spoiler, Rand Getlin at Yahoo! News shared them: “Larry Ellison ‘has someone in a powerboat following [his] yacht to retrieve balls that go overboard.’”

On his personal blog, Felix Salmon writes Scoops: When journalists masturbate. Lest your mind wander into dangerous territory, let us burst that bubble of smut by telling you he’s referring to breaking news. Lisa O'Carroll said, “Interesting read by @felixsalmon on breaking news v explanatory news. Don't think it's quite as black + white myself.” DJ Bentley was “Inclined to agree with @felixsalmon. Readers want the best journalism. They care little about who broke it first.” While Nick Reisman tried to find a middle ground: “On ending the scoop culture among journalists. Isn't it possible to have something first and explain it the best?” All of this this brings to mind a tweet from Vanity Fair’s Richard Lawson who recently wrote, “I want you to explain the news to me as hard as you can.”

For another blog post making the rounds today, Robert Feder gave us his 2014 edition of the most powerful women in Chicago journalism. Maria Ines Zamudio at The Chicago Reporter Magazine tweeted: “My awesome boss @susaneudora was named one of the most powerful women in #Chicago journalism.” Kurt Gessler at the Chicago Tribune congratulated: “@amyguth @JaneHirt and @jwinnecke.” Shamus Toomey with DNAinfo Chicago sent out “Big congrats to @jensabella.” Andrew Wang from Crain's Chicago Business explained the downside to this kind of notoriety: “Intoxicated with power, @ShiaKapos already demanding own office barista.”

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