All things media this Monday

Newsroom screenwriter Aaron Sorkin climbs up on a new soapbox to chastise journalists for helping the Sony Hackers (10,500+ shares). "If a thug stole a woman's purse and dumped its contents on your desk, would you write about it? That's the Sony hack," reflects Bloomberg View's James Greiff. "OK, here's something I agree with Aaron Sorkin about," admits The New Yorker's Emily Nussbaum. Although as The Verge's Casey Newton points out, "A good sign that a story is newsworthy is when one of the principals writes 1,200 words explaining why it’s not." Let's just say Gersh Kuntzman of the New York Daily News does not agree, either: "Wow, Aaron Sorkin slams media in Sony hack case. He should STFU. You want us on that wall. You NEED us on that wall."

Similarly, Sony Pictures is demanding that news agencies delete the "stolen" data (3,700+ shares). "An Onion-like story...until you remember who sits on SCOTUS," notes Susan Arbetter with WCNY Syracuse. "Sony Pictures, welcome to 2014. There's this thing called the Internet and another called security. Learn about both," suggests Verge's Tom Warren.

NYT's David Carr profiles Charles C. Johnson, the blogger hell-bent on sowing mayhem, one click at a time (1,700+ shares). "In which @carr2n compares Charles Johnson with the mood slime in Ghostbusters 2," elaborates colleague Ravi Somaiya. Although Statesman Journal's Thomas Patterson sees it differently: "In which @carr2n commits the cardinal Internet sin of feeding the troll." At Mediaite, Evan McMurry wonders, "Does Chuck Johnson get whiplash going from unbeatable hero->poor victim so quickly, so often?"

And checking in on #TakeoutGate, a Boston.com editor has been suspended for that unfortunate T-shirt incident while Streetwise Media's Galen Moore discusses how to cover another newsroom's "very bad day." And speaking of coverage, the Columbia Journalism Review offers analysis on how political campaigns use Twitter to shape media coverage.

Plus, Bloomberg Business: coming soon to a web site near you.

Learn how to get more press, set up alerts that are "better than Google Alerts" and make reports on the impact of articles.

Request a Muck Rack Demo