Thursday threads to follow

"Missy's back! And there's marionettes in her video. This will be my walk-up song to all of my meetings today," announces USA Today's Holly Moore, sharing "Where They From," the newly dropped single from rapping demigoddess Missy Elliott, her first in seven years (and which has racked up 30,000+ shares so far). Or, "Joy to the World, Missy Elliott Is Here," as The Atlantic puts it. "Break dancing on 'hover boards' in the new Missy video. I'm liking the track a lot," reacts Jamillah Knowles at Reuters. "This is NOT a #TBT. This is new & a reminder that Missy Elliott remains from the future," decides Will Graves with the Associated Press. "And this is what a woman who's confident in her power looks like," comes the takeaway from GamesRadar's Susan Arendt. "Never has dressing up like a disco ball looked so damn good," realizes freelance journalist Sumi Das. Jay Caspian Kang at the New York Times is "ready to read 50 pieces on how good this new missy video is. GET TO WORK INTERNET." So, yeah. Now you know what today's journalist jam is.

All right, so now that we got that out of our system, we'll point you to an AP exclusive on how Ben Carson has profited from ties with a convicted felon, despite his "tough on crime" talk. "They found Carson's Rezko," summarizes Timothy Carney at the Washington Examiner. Meanwhile, Marco Rubio's low-budget campaign looks to ramp up as voting nears. "At one Rubio Nevada office, staff cut costs by stealing wifi from a pizza place next door. Until they got caught," details AP's Julie Pace. Also, Jezebel caught up with Johari Osayi Idusuyi, the hero who read through a Trump rallyGothamist's Christopher Robbins concludes, "the woman who refused to be reading-shamed at the Trump rally is f**king awesome." In other political must-reads, check out Kenneth Vogel's look at how the Kochs created Sen. Joni Ernst. "Big development that could reshape the @GOP: the Koch bros operation is starting to get more involved in primaries," Vogel explains.

And while we're talking politics, you should feel free to peruse Fusion's epic Political Image Machine, which the elections team fashioned by scraping 70,000 images from each candidate's Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and tagging them by topic. The result: a fully searchable database of all the bizarre and mundane photos they've published so far.

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