The blues on the news

If you haven't already caught wind of the accusations facing LA Times music critic Sasha Frere-Jones, you're in for a ride: Frere-Jones has resigned after (it's rumored) expensing the Times for a $5,000 strip club tab. "I'm sorry, I can't hear very well in here. Did you say $5000?" incredulously asks Politico's Timothy Noah. "Haven't been this disappointed in Sasha Frere-Jones since I learned he was actually a middle-aged white guy," admits independent journalist Zach Everson. Freelancer Drew Millard envisions how that went down: "*blacks out at strip club* *wakes up, checks bank balance* *emails receipts to editor*." Jesse Katz with Los Angeles Magazine, on the other hand, actually sounds a little impressed: "Props. When I wrote about 'gentleman's clubs' for @latimes in 1995, my biggest tab was only $600."  Also, it was a PR person who did him in, in case you wondered.

Meanwhile, the Trump campaign appears to have canceled a reporter's interview after they heard him speak Spanish. "Breaking news: Spanish is Trump's kryptonite! It's the one way to get him to turn down an interview," realizes WaPo's Carlos Lozada. "If true no journalist should agree to interview @realDonaldTrump until @mstupenengo gets his interview," asserts Marc R. Masferrer at the Bradenton Herald. And at BBC News, they've unveiled their strategy for saving £15m by website cuts: by removing thousands of recipes. "Quick, get the creme brulee details now!" warns RTÉ's Ciaran O'Byrne. It's not all doom and gloom in media this morning, though. For one thing, ESPN just launched The Undefeated, its new digital platform exploring the intersection of race, sports and culture, and EIC Kevin Merida seems like a pretty proud papa. "On the 62nd anniv of Brown v Board, @TheUndefeated is launched. @meridak vows 'no day without swagger,'" shares NYT's Jonathan Martin. Plus, what does the First Amendment look like in the digital age? The Knight Foundation and Columbia University will spend $60 million to find out.

Still, before you get too hopeful, we submit to you this peculiar satire from Gawker Media, where it's apparently Honesty Week.

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