What a tangled web we have woven

How to beat Donald Trump

...but not the way many of you will like.

According to Senator Bernie Sanders, "Carrier just showed corporations how to beat Donald Trump." Writing at the Washington Post (15,000 shares), Sanders responds to the news that Carrier's parent company will receive $7 million in tax breaks, in exchange for keeping in Indiana around half of the 2,000 workers it was going to offshore to Mexico, like this:

"[Trump] was insisting on very steep tariffs for companies like Carrier that left the United States and wanted to sell their foreign-made products back in the United States. Instead of a damn tax, the company will be rewarded with a damn taxcut. Wow! How’s that for standing up to corporate greed? How’s that for punishing corporations that shut down in the United States and move abroad? In essence, United Technologies took Trump hostage and won. And that should send a shock wave of fear through all workers across the country."

".@SenSanders writes that every corporation in the country now knows how to twist Trump's arm into sweetheart deals," tweets Elizabeth Bruenig of the Washington Post.

"Damn, Bernie Sanders, tell us how u really feel," says Flavorwire's Sarah Seltzer, adding the hashtag "#berned."

Here's the Nation's Sarah Jaffe: "Bernie Sanders on the Carrier agreement striking the right notes: this is a giveaway, not a win."

And finally, The Week's Ryan Cooper weighs in on what this means about Bernie himself: "Bernie's offer to 'work with' Trump was, no surprise, calling his bluff,"

There's never been a situation remotely like this

That's how Richard Stevenson of the New York Times characterizes to his paper's latest Trump expose: "The Array of Conflicts Facing the Trump Presidency." (13,000 shares).

NYU professor Jay Rosen singles out one of the many graphics in the post that communicate Trump's conflicts of interest: "This graphic deserves the praise it is getting. Simple, factual, effective, clear."

Or, as the Times' Sam Dolnick puts it, "What a tangled web we have woven."

Well this is awkward.

That's Nicholas Riccardi of the AP weighing in on the shouting match that erupted at a Harvard University forum between Kellyanne Conway and Robby Mook, the respective campaign managers of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, along with a number of other campaign aides.

One of the most quoted lines came from Clinton's communications director Jennifer Palmieri: "If providing a platform for white supremacists makes me a brilliant tactician, I am proud to have lost. I would rather lose than win the way you guys did.”

To which Conway responded, "Guys, I can tell you are angry, but wow. Hashtag he’s your president. How’s that? Will you ever accept the election results? Will you tell your protesters that he’s their president, too?”

"Astonishing & illuminating," writes Mike Wereschagin of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. "Both sides understand their opponent better than their candidate."

But perhaps the biggest amount of scorn—at least from journalists on Twitter—was reserved for former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, who said, "This is the problem with the media. You guys took everything that Donald Trump said so literally."

"This is both a literally and seriously idiotic thing to say," tweets Binyamin Appelbaum, referring to Lewandowski's comment.

Elswhere, NBC's Bradd Jaffy characterized the comment, thusly: "Lewandowski complains that the media accurately reported Trump's own words."

In other news:

According to the Washington Post's Dan Lamothe, "Donald Trump has chosen retired Marine Gen. James N. Mattis to be secretary of defense." As the Columbus Dispatch's Holly Zachariah notes, "General 'Mad Dog' Mattis has said responding to 'political Islam' is our priority."

Why was Rafael Sanchez, the chief investigator at ABC's Indianapolis affiliate, denied press credentials to Trump's Carrier event? The Indy Channel's P.J. O'Keefe investigates.

"The big story about Russian propaganda and the election was itself propaganda," tweets the New Yorker's Nicholas Thompson, linking to his magazine's piece on the matter by Adrian Chen who "goes deep," adds Thompson.

"A new @USATODAY investigation shows black people are killed in police chases at a rate 3 times higher than others," tweets the newspaper's investigations editor John Kelly.

And finally, let this headline from the Washington Post's Philip Bump sink in: "Donald Trump will be president thanks to 80,000 people in three states."

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