It’s the end of the year as we know it

Ladies first

Feminism Lost. Now What?  Susan Chira at the New York TImes Deb Price called it a “Terrific read on the challenge ahead for feminism.”

One good thing that is happening for women today: Companies are Hotly Pursuing the New Wave of Women in Tech. That report, also called Join Our Board, comes thanks to Pui-Wing Tam at the New York Times. Karlin Lillington thinks it’s a “Very interesting shift.” Clare O'Connor said,” It's a start.” And Prashant Rao was more literal in his tweet: “The pursuit of women to join Silicon Valley boards has become particularly intense.”

What now?

When you’re done with all of that, head to Politico to read up on The Death of Clintonism.

And take comfort knowing that in his last days of office, Obama will huddle with Hill Democrats about saving Obamacare, Politico tells us. Nolan McCaskill almost couldn’t believe it, tweeting: “Whoaaaa. @POTUS is heading to the Hill to talk with Dems on saving Obamacare from President Trump and a GOP Congress.”

Elsewhere in our government, the Agriculture Department wants a correction from Fox News on a food-stamp fraud report. That tidbit from Erik Wemple at the Washington Post.

About the cops

And check in on the Washington Post’s report that Fatal shootings by police remain relatively unchanged after two years, writes Kimbriell Kelly. Wesley Lowery tweeted: “WaPo has spent two years tracking fatal shootings by police. Here's what we've learned.” Wesley also tweeted the report, saying there’s a “slight downtick, but police still fatally shooting about same number of people: 991 in 2015, 957 this year.”

Then in the Wall Street Journal, there’s an in-depth look at Why Some Problem Cops Don’t Lose Their Badges. It is the work of Louise Radnofsky, Zusha Elinson, John R. Emshwiller, and Gary Fields there. Tim Hanrahan wrote, “What happens after police officers are charged with crimes? In hundreds of cases, they got back into law enforcement.” And Susan Benkelman added, “Infractions that disqualify barbers or child-care providers don’t always bar officers from retaining jobs.”

Our Russia problem

No doubt, you’ve heard about the Russian sanctions announced by the White House yesterday.

And you already know that Russia Is Set to Expel 35 U.S. Diplomats in Reprisal, Interfax Says to Henry Meyer at Bloomberg.

So you’re probably also aware that Russia also closed two compounds.

And they’re not done - according to the Washington Post’s Andrew Roth, Russia plans retaliation and ‘serious discomfort’ over U.S. hacking sanctions.

Well, here’s some new news on the matter for you: We're living through the first world cyberwar - but just haven’t called it that according to Martin Belam at The Guardian. Martin cheekily tweeted his piece, saying, “I regret to inform you that I have been writing again.”

And Andrew Kramer at the New York Times rather agrees and writes How Russia Recruited Elite Hackers for Its Cyberwar.

Meanwhile, Craig Silverman took a look at the fake news stories that went viral in 2016 - aka Russia’s handiwork. And tweeted this to go with it, “(Note: these are 100% fake, not false/mistaken.)”

It’s the end of the year, as we know it

To put a period on the crap fest that was 2016, David Fahrenthold tells the behind-the-scenes story of his year covering Trump in the Washington Post. He added on Twitter: “How a rally in Iowa and a campaign mgr's falsehood set the stories in motion.”

For another Year in Review of 2016 here’s Dave Barry’s in the Miami Herald, rather appropriately titled “What the ... ?Rick Hirsch said of the piece, “You thought 2016 was bad? Wait til Dave Barry has at it.”

Don’t fret though, cause Pete Souza published his Behind the Lens: 2016 Year in Photographs  on Medium. And it’s genuinely wonderful. Philip Bump wrote, “The White House photographer offers the year in photos.” Holly Edgell tweeted, “@petesouza & his staff... I can't imagine how future #WhiteHouse photogs could top them!” And Joe Were called it, “Such amazing imagery of Obama. Pete Souza is incredible ?? “

Onward

For a read that’ll take you into the weekend, be sure to spend some time with Becoming Ugly, a piece from Jezebel’s Madeleine Davies. Madeleine herself tweeted: “On my desire to disgust those who oppress us.”

And here’s something we can look forward to in the new year and beyond: Self-driving cars will exacerbate organ shortages, Ian Adams and Anne Hobson at Slate say. Alex Hern called the piece “an amazing take.”

 

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