A Trump-free zone? Good luck and here's why

Christopher Clarey of The New York Times has read Farhad Manjoo’s piece in the Times. In I Ignored Trump News for a Week. Here’s What I Learned, Mangoo tells us that “There is no such thing as a Trump-free zone on the internet. Even Amazon recommended Trump toilet paper for V-day,” tweets Leslie Picker of CNBC. Pitchfork’s Mark Richardson calls it a “good piece re overdosing on news about you-know-who,” while Alexander Zalben of TV Guide adds that it offers “Some extremely helpful advice on filtering your news feed (and consumption).” “GREAT read,” says Julie Bykowicz of the Associated Press, quoting this nugget: “He is the Harambe of politics, the undisputed king of all media."

Nerding out over this.

Elizabeth Sile of Departures Magazine is digging into the Washington Post's 100 days of Trump claims, a running list compiled by its Fact Checking team. The tally so far? 33 days, 133 false or misleading claims. WaPo’s Chris Cillizza does the math for you: “Donald Trump is averaging 4 false or misleading claims a day since being sworn in.” Mike Rosenberg of the Seattle Times breaks it down further: “Trump is averaging a lie or misleading statement once every 6 hours through his first month in office.” But possibly the easiest math to get your head around comes from WaPo fact checker Michelle Ye Hee Lee: “Number of days in Trump presidency so far without any false or misleading claims by Trump: 0.” Jed Gottlieb of the Boston Herald tweets for all of us when he says, “The @washingtonpost doing the lord's work.”

“Good news in a dark time.” Frank Smyth is referring to the news that “Muslim activists start campaign to restore desecrated Jewish graves” in a Jewish cemetery in St. Louis. Two widely tweeted quotes from Colby Itkowitz’s story in the Washington Post: "Every person deserves to rest in peace,” from the headline, and “Is it not a human soul?”

According to Paul Mason of Channel 4 News, “You only need to read one thing on Milo's downfall,” and that’s Laurie Penny’s piece in Pacific Standard magazine, On the Milo Bus With the Lost Boys of America’s New Right. “This is some beautiful writing by @PennyRed on milo and his band of dangerous lost boys,” tweets Marisa Kabas. Adds Ryan Singel, “These are good sentences from @pennyred on the Milo lost boy disciples.” And Alex Donaldson: “Wow, this is an utterly incredible piece of writing. Must read.”

Folks, this is happening...

Charles Blow of The New York Times is directing you to New Trump Deportation Rules Allow Far More Deportations, Ron Nixon and Michael Shear’s reporting in the Times about documents released by the Department of Homeland Security on Tuesday (28,000+ shares). “Bad policy. Police officers and sheriff’s deputies to become de facto #immigration agents,” tweets Jen Abbasi of JAMA. “These are cruel cold days we're living in,” says Caron Golden of San Diego Magazine. Tweets Greg Neumann of KWWL-TV (Waterloo, IA) and WKOW-TV (Madison, WI), commenting on Alan Gomez’s reporting in USA Today of the sweeping plan to deport undocumented immigrants, “@SpeakerRyan said repeatedly 'there will be no deportation force' - @POTUS plans to add 10,000 new ICE agents.” Jamil Smith of MTV News wonders, “Who will be the next to be blamed for all of America's problems when all of the undocumented immigrants are gone?” “If anything else," tweets Taylor Tepper of Money, "this should disabuse people of the notion that Trump and Clinton were the same.”

RUN BESSIE RUN

“This is excellent television,” tweeted Jeremy Barr. “This cow is just kinda having a day out in Jamaica, Queens,” added Jason Rabinowitz of Airline Reporter. Ben Berkowitz of WNBC-TV kept us glued our screens after a “rogue bull” escaped a Queens slaughterhouse and ran through the streets for hours, bringing up this interesting tidbit: It was at least the third loose cow in Queens in the last 14 months. Never let it be said that reporters aren’t a generous bunch. “Cow, if you make it to Long Island City, you can live in my bathtub,” offered Molly Fitzpatrick. “RUN BESSIE RUN,” tweeted Stephanie Haberman of Vocativ. But eventually, all things must come to an end. “#Cowrambe has been captured,” Berkowitz tweeted. Sadly, the bull died after being captured. We’re trying to look on the bright side. As NBC News’ Bradd Jaffy tweeted, “Folks, the Queens bull died. I'm sad. But what a way to go out. Helluva final day on earth.”

Chill

“This is one rollicking good smackdown of the tendency we journalists have to blow smoke up our own rear-ends,” Barry Malone of Al Jazeera English tweets. Chill with the “Journalists are Heroes” Thing, Hamilton Nolan’s takedown on Deadspin, gets your attention right up front with this: “As someone who worked for years as a media reporter, I can say with authority that two things are true: 1) Journalists are fascinated by news about journalists, and 2) Nobody else is.” While Tim Donnelly takes the view that, “person who never does actual reporting has something to say about reporters,” others, like for instance Bryon Tau, think “This is accurate.” Or as Joe Brown of Popular Science tweets, “Tough but fair.” Silvia Foster-Frau is crystal clear about it: “:O A MUST READ. Not sure I even agree with this. But so interesting.” Let’s take the advice of the National Post’s Tristin Hopper: “This article is best read as a Glengarry Glen Ross-style monologue screamed at a first-year journalism class."

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Andrew Schneider dies

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Andrew Schneider has died at age 74. Schneider worked for the Pittsburgh Press and Seattle Post-Intelligencer as a public-health reporter, receiving two consecutive Pulitzer Prizes while working for the Press. He co-founded the National Institute for Advanced Reporting at Indiana University and served as its first chair. His wife, Kathy Best, a Pulitzer Prize winner herself, is editor of The Missoulian.

While he was at the Post-Intelligencer, Schneider broke the story of asbestos contamination in Libby, Montana, leading to an EPA Superfund cleanup. Along with his editor David McCumber, he published a book of the findings, "An Air That Kills: How the Asbestos Poisoning of Libby, Montana Uncovered a National Scandal.” In the Independent Record (Helena, MT), McCumber writes that Schneider will be remembered “as a relentless, inspiring reporter who built indelible relationships with people from all walks of life—colleagues, news sources and the ordinary people on whose behalf he worked,” adding that “[h]is skill at befriending news sources led him to achieve a kind of access to information journalists almost never get today.”

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