First things first

A heck of a lot has happened since we sent out this fair newsletter yesterday.

First, OJ Simpson was granted parole.

The U.S. will ban Americans from traveling to North Korea, according to the Associated Press.

And tragically, Linkin Park frontman Chester Bennington died yesterday by suicide. TMZ’s Natalie Rich broke the news.

People around President Trump

Sean Spicer resigned.

Anthony Scaramucci might become the new communications director.

Jared Kushner's White House connection is still being used to lure Chinese investors. That from CNN’s Drew Griffin and Curt Devine.

Steve Bannon’s disappeared, Eliana Johnson and Annie Karni highlight in Politico. They say it’s an apparent “bid to save his job.”

Mark Corallo, the spokesman for Trump’s legal team, resigned just 2 months into the job. Read all about it from Politico’s Josh Dawsey.

Paul Manafort is being investigated by a special counsel for possible money laundering. That investigation is outlined in the Wall Street Journal by Erica Orden, Geoffrey Fowler, Christopher Mims, and Joanna Stern.

And Sergei Lavrov, Russia's Foreign Minister, told NBCNews’ Keir Simmons that Trump and Putin might have had more meetings at G-20.

Did someone say 'Russia'?

Bob Mueller Is Expanding His Probe to Trump’s Business Transactions, according to Bloomberg’s Greg Farrell and Christian Berthelsen.

Trump’s lawyers might be looking to undercut Mueller’s Russia investigation, Tom Hamburger reports for the Washington Post.

There’s a similar report in the New York Times from Michael Schmidt, Maggie Haberman, and Matt Apuzzo that Trump aides are investigating the investigators.

The whole thing gets a little nuttier and more complicated when you read that the Moscow lawyer who met Donald Trump Jr. also had a Russian spy agency as his client, as reported via Maria Tsvetkova and Jack Stubbs in a Reuters exclusive.

Elsewhere, Microsoft Pushes to Take Over Russian Spies' Network Kevin Poulsen reported in the Daily Beast. While Katie Baker called it, “Microsoft's cat-and-mouse game to block Fancy Bear.

And we’re on the brink of an authoritarian crisis. Or at least that what’s Brian Beutler at The New Republic says. “Me on tonight’s shocking news, and the threat to fire Robert Mueller,” Beutler tweeted. Matt Bors reacted with: “*pauses from seeing 3 days of takes on memes and rudeness*” John Wonderlich called it: “Clarity on the crisis.” And Matt O'Brien went with the ominous, “more realistic than anyone wants to admit.”

When the New York Times when Trump

From NYT, excerpts from their interview with Trump which includes nuggets like "There are very few Republicans in Baltimore, if any," (as tweeted by Matt Haber) and "The F.B.I. person really reports directly to the president...which is interesting,” (as tweeted by Mark Berman). Meanwhile, William Turton wrote, “This totally not staged Trump interaction with his granddaughter is hilarious.” John Harwood added, “Trump to NYT on his Chinese-speaking grand-daughter: ‘She’s unbelievable, huh? Good, smart genes.” And Josh Kolm finished it off with: “Even if it's his granddaughter doing it, there is something deeply unnerving about someone calling Trump ‘grandpa.’”

There’s also this major headline from Peter Baker, Michael Schmidt, and Maggie Haberman that made news yesterday: In Interview, Trump Expresses Anger at Sessions and Comey, and Warns Mueller. “BIG: Trump told NYT he wouldn't have appointed A.G. Sessions if he'd known Sessions would recuse himself on Russia,” Clifford Levy tweeted.

“We checked the facts,” the New York Times tweeted following their interview with President Trump. Linda Qiu there points out that President Trump Made Several Misleading Claims when talking to the Grey Lady.

Speaking of Trump interviews, the Washington Post’s Philip Bump points out: “Looked at 19 interviews. Trump can generally get about 35 percent of the way in before mentioning Clinton.” As the headline puts it, that’s about a third of the way through.

Other depressing sh*t

There’s a piece on Foster Care as Punishment: The New Reality of ‘Jane Crow’. It was written by Stephanie Clifford and Jessica Silver-Greenberg at the New York Times, the latter of whom tweeted: “If you're poor and black in NYC, a parenting mishap can be seen as a crime.”

Also in the Times, Americans Who Hated the Health Law. Until the Idea of Repeal Sank In.

Climate experts were pulled from a Glacier National Park tour with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, according to Lisa Rein at the Washington Post. Laura Helmuth points out “Glacier superintendent [was] kept out of Zuckerberg tour. Staff wasn't allowed to FB it.” Mark Berman explained it a different way: “When Mark Zuckerberg visited Glacier National Park, Trump admin officials pulled climate experts from the tour group.”

And media news for your Friday

“It's he-ere!” Matt Thompson tweeted excitedly. The Atlantic has a podcast now. “Hey, cool,” Emma Green tweeted. While David Frum introduced it a bit more formally: “From the studios of CJBQ Belleville overlooking the Bay of Quinte, I join the first Atlantic Radio podcast.”

Finally, Sean Hannity will no longer receive Buckley Award “after controversy.” That being some conspiracy theories Hannity shared on his cable news show which, CNN’s Jake Tapper reports, “had caused hand wringing among some conservatives.”

Learn how to get more press, set up alerts that are "better than Google Alerts" and make reports on the impact of articles.

Request a Muck Rack Demo