Serena had that baby

Happy Labor Day! We’re doing the heavy lifting for you today. Here’s your round-up of news.

Speaking of labor, we’ll start with the news that even though Serena Williams isn’t playing in the U.S. Open this year, she's still making headlines. Serena Williams Gives Birth to Baby Girl, reports Vanity Fair’s Katey Rich, who tweets, “Serena had that baby.”

Not to be outdone? The Duchess of Cambridge, who is expecting her third child, as reported by BBC News. Or, as Shane Brennan of the Daily Post headlines it, Former Anglesey helicopter pilot expecting third child.

The political news doesn’t take a holiday, no matter how much we might wish it would. Your round-up includes Will Hall’s scoop in POLITICO, Trump has decided to end DACA, with 6-month delay; AP sources: Trump expected to end 'Dreamers' program, from AP’s Jill Colvin, Catherine Lucey; and the story from Maggie Haberman and Glenn Thrush of The New York Times, Trump Strongly Considering Ending DACA, With 6-Month Delay. Michael Grunwald of POLITICO shares the news that Obama to speak out if Trump ends DACA.

Meanwhile, Kevin Liptak of CNN has the Exclusive: Read the Inauguration Day letter Obama left for Trump.

Also, “Yes, your government using your money to make it harder for other Americans to get affordable health care,” Simon Rosenberg tweets, linking to The Same Agency That Runs Obamacare Is Using Taxpayer Money to Undermine It, by Audrey Carlsen and Haeyoun Park of The New York Times.

But then there’s this: Minnesotans want to replace a statue of Christopher Columbus with Prince, which is Daniela Cobos’ piece for the International Business Times (reposted by Raw Story).

4 days. 3 reporters. 51 inches of rain.

The Houston Chronicle continues to chronicle Harvey’s aftermath. In Missing volunteer pulled from Cypress Creek, Susan Carroll and Lomi Kriel report on Alonso Guillen, a 31-year-old disc jockey and DACA recipient who had moved to Lufkin, Texas, from Mexico as a teenager. “The recovery of his body brings the number of people who have died or are feared dead from Harvey to nearly 60, and officials warn that more could be found,” they write. Kriel also reports, Fearing deportation, immigrant flood victims make do on their own.

Also at the Houston Chronicle, an interactive piece from Mike Hixenbaugh, David Hunn and Mark Collette reveals Harvey: Terror, heartbreak and heroism as five Houstonians brave America’s worst storm. Tweets Hunn, “4 days. 3 reporters. 51 inches of rain.”

“This story. These photos,” tweets John Branch, who links to A Flying Cowboy Rides to Rescue Cattle Stranded in Harvey’s Floods, by John Schwartz and Livia Albeck-Ripka of The New York Times. Says Henry Fountain, “Great story on post-Harvey cattle heli-driving by @jswatz and @livia_ar. Worth it for the Roy Rogers link alone.”

The AP exclusive from Jason Dearen and Michael Biesecker, Toxic waste sites flooded; EPA not on scene, reveals that “Floodwaters inundate at least 5 highly contaminated toxic waste sites near Houston, raising concerns,” as AP tweets. And Julie Pace tweets, “EPA says Superfund sites around Houston aren't accessible to its personnel. @AP got to 7 by boat, vehicle, on foot.”

So you may recognize the AP story from this: “Here's the story that led the EPA to personally attack a reporter without pointing out any factual inaccuracies,” tweets POLITICO’s Matthew Nussbaum. He reports, Trump’s EPA attacks AP reporter in personal terms. As Charles Sheehan points out, “This rebuke of AP reporting by EPA singled out 0 inaccuracies, and was later removed EPA site.” Dan Barry calls it “The us-v-them ploy, trying to distract from damning facts.”

For more on The Associated Press, Ian Burrell of The Drum explains How a 171-year-old news agency is the hidden mainstay of news on Facebook. “Biggest provider of stories on biggest social media platform (Facebook) is world’s oldest news agency, The @AP.” tweets Bobby Caina Calvan.

Meanwhile, in California, BuzzFeed’s Brianna Sacks has the images out of Los Angeles: Los Angeles Is Battling The Biggest Wildfire In Its History And The Photos Are Unreal.

Your everlasting summer / You can see it fading fast

We lost a couple of legendary artists over the weekend, Steely Dan co-founder Walter Becker and poet John Ashbery.

Read the Walter Becker obit from Daniel Kreps in Rolling Stone, Walter Becker, Steely Dan Co-Founder, Dead at 67, and Jon Pareles's in The New York Times, Walter Becker, Co-Creator of Steely Dan, Dies at 67. “All my musical heroes are dying,” says Philip Booth and we know how you feel. “Your everlasting summer / You can see it fading fast,” tweets Brian Steinberg.

At The New Yorker, Dan Chiasson offers Postscript: John Ashbery, which begins, “The greatest American poet of the last fifty years has died.” Read The Paris Review’s In Memoriam, John Ashbery, 1927-2017; the obit from Mark Ford in The Guardian, John Ashbery obituary; and the tribute from David Orr and Dinitia Smith at The New York Times, John Ashbery, a Singular Poet Whose Influence Was Broad, Dies at 90. “Studious as a butterfly in a parking lot. RIP John Ashbery,” tweets Felipe Ossa. “‘There I was: a stinking adult.’ RIP, Ashbery.” says Mary Karr.

Behold

“Attention photographer friends,” says Katie Nelson. She directs you to Reuters launches grant program to develop the next generation of photojournalists. Tweets Jason Silverstein, “Tweeting this because it's an awesome opportunity and young journos should be aware of it."

So let’s close out today’s Daily here, because this ought to keep you busy on your day off—and then some. “Behold” says Conor Friedersdorf of The Atlantic, who directs you to More Than 100 Fantastic Works of Journalism From 2016. “This fantastic nonfiction from 2016 is still worth discovering and pondering today,” he writes. As Jack Shafer tweets, “Thanks to @conor64, I have about 5 months of reading plotted out for me.”

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