Investor in curious things (at skvcap.com). Lapsed golf course maintenance guy. Previously enigmatic.

The Volkswagen Settlement: How Bad Management Leads to Big Punishment

newyorker.com — By many critical measures, the Justice Department's announcement on Tuesday that Volkswagen had agreed to pay $14.7 billion to resolve claims related to its diesel-emissions scandal was startling. For one thing, it is the largest class-action settlement ever, billions more than the one Enron agreed to in 2008.

Basketball and Immigration - Medium

medium.com — (Six things worth knowing before you read this: This was written near the beginning of the current 2015/2016 NBA season. I know nothing about basketball. I don't even know who won this season. I know nothing about basketball. I wrote this to play with some pro sports immigration data, not to further my knowledge of basketball.

Proper labeling of axes is absolutely crucial.

Conversation with @Richard_Florida

The Dubious Logic of Stock-Market Circuit Breakers

newyorker.com — Many things that are supposed to make you safer don't actually do so. Taking off your shoes at airports, for example, is largely security theatre. (How many prospective shoe bombers have been nabbed since Richard Reid?) But the practice offers the impression of protection, so it stays-just to be on the safe side, you know.

An Engineering Theory of the Volkswagen Scandal

newyorker.com — Last week, Volkswagen of America C.E.O. Michael Horn told a House subcommittee investigating his company's ongoing emissions scandal that it wasn't a corporate decision to cheat emissions tests by installing "defeat" software in eleven million diesel cars. Instead, Horn said, it was "a couple of software engineers."

Here's why finance is about to be disrupted

radar.oreilly.com — Request an invitation to Next:Money , O'Reilly's conference focused on the fundamental transformation taking place in the finance industry. Editor's note: We're approaching an inflection point in all things "money" - currency, transactions, markets, and capitalism itself. Fundamental changes in the financial industry, driven by technology but with implications for every business and government, are beginning to manifest, bringing both disruption and opportunity.

Google's Microsoft moment - Business Insider

businessinsider.com — When might Google have its Microsoft moment? That is, when will it begin its inexorable decline - as most aging tech companies do when their growth stalls, and as Microsoft did - largely unbeknownst to (and even denied by) most observers? How might we know?

Google, Microsoft, Stall Points, and Growth

blog.kedrosky.com — April 7, 2015 When might Google have its Microsoft moment? That is, when will it begin its inexorable decline - as most aging tech companies do when their growth stalls, and as Microsoft did - largely unbeknownst to (and even denied by) most... | Paul Kedrosky | Svbtle

Tech Bubbles, FOMO & Revenge Effects

blog.kedrosky.com — What are we missing in all the chatter about fear of missing out (FOMO), scarcity, and the current technology bubble among late-stage private companies? I'll posit a few things, some obvious, some less so, and a couple deranged and hypothetical: Lots of people took this 2001 bumper sticker very seriously: Knowing that most of the money is made by being early to prominent tech IPOs, they did the rational thing: They bought earlier.
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