Science writer at The Atlantic. Author of I CONTAIN MULTITUDES, a New York Times bestseller on animal-microbe partnerships http://smarturl.it/icontainmultitudes

Mysterious Ocean Blobs Aren’t So Mysterious

By Ed Yong
theatlantic.com — Most of the weird blobby creatures that star in those viral videos live in this zone. And while they're unfamiliar and unidentifiable to most researchers, people like Haddock and Osborn can almost always instantly recognize them-if not to the species, then at least to the broad group.

The Inevitable Evolution of Bad Science

By Ed Yong
theatlantic.com — A simulation shows how the incentives of modern academia naturally select for weaker and less reliable results. For us to continue writing great stories, we need to display ads. Please select the extension that is blocking ads. Please follow the steps below

How Male Widow Spiders Avoid Being Cannibalized During Sex

By Ed Yong
news.nationalgeographic.com — For male widow spiders, mating is an infamously dangerous activity. In these species, which include the black widow and redback, the large females will often devour the smaller males during sex-hence the "widow" in their names. In some cases, the female catches the male while he's trying to escape.

American Whalers Killed Way More Than Just Whales

Microbes, Viruses and Destiny

Scientists Have Found Another Crow That Uses Tools

By Ed Yong
theatlantic.com — And they're extinct in the wild For us to continue writing great stories, we need to display ads. Please select the extension that is blocking ads. Please follow the steps below Many animal species can be trained to use tools in captivity even when they don't do so naturally.

Stingrays Chew? Who Knew?

By Ed Yong
news.nationalgeographic.com — Plenty of animals bite, but mammals were once thought to be the only ones to chew, at least as it's usually defined: moving our toothy jaws up, down, and side to side to tear through tough food. But chew on this: the ocellate river stingray, a beautiful spotted fish from the Amazon River, also chews its food.

The Origin of Dogs

theatlantic.com — For us to continue writing great stories, we need to display ads. Please select the extension that is blocking ads. How and when did wild wolves turn into domestic pets? Science tells us that humans were behind the domestication of what is now man's best friend-but the timeline of the transformation has always been mysterious.

Psychology’s 'Simple Little Tricks' Are Falling Apart

By Ed Yong
theatlantic.com — In yet another setback for the field, psychologists have failed to replicate two studies showing that basic techniques can reduce racial achievement gaps and improve voter turnout.

Stunning Videos of Evolution in Action

By Ed Yong
theatlantic.com — The MEGA-plate allows scientists to watch bacteria adapting to antibiotics before their eyes. For us to continue writing great stories, we need to display ads. Please select the extension that is blocking ads. Please follow the steps below
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Sep 28, 2016

RT @williams_paige: Fascinating @edyong209 piece on the "weird blobby creatures" that live in the ocean's "midwater" https://t.co/h7r2RFVQID ht @leafdoctor

Sep 27, 2016

@Scientits I mean, we should explore all approaches. But I don't trust the Telegraph's reporting at all

Sep 27, 2016

@Paulsfenton Parasitism is indeed a type of symbiosis

Sep 27, 2016

Yesterday's news summarised: power-posing is bullshit, shoulder-shimmies are in.


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