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Jamaican beaches lure tourists but calls to also make locals welcome Reuters

Jamaican beaches lure tourists but calls to also make locals welcome

KINGSTON, Jamaica (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - One recent holiday, a carload of Jamaicans went in search of a beach to have a picnic. On an island with nearly 800 km (500 miles) of coastline, they did not think it would be hard. But it was nearly impossible.

May 29, 2017 Go to Article

Does Electrifying Mosquitoes Protect People From Disease? The Atlantic

Does Electrifying Mosquitoes Protect People From Disease?

Maybe a little, but that's not why bug zappers are so popular. An Object Lesson. Once I brought my zapper home, I spent some quality time happily waving my new magic wand at every flying insect. I was a convert. I wondered about the effectiveness.

May 5, 2017 Go to Article

Jamaica’s Labour Party Promised ‘Prosperity for All.’ Can It Deliver? World Politics Review

Jamaica’s Labour Party Promised ‘Prosperity for All.’ Can It Deliver?

A year ago, Jamaican voters, tired of years of severe austerity measures, unexpectedly ushered in a new government. The left-leaning People’s National Party (PNP), which had held power for much of the past 25 years, was widely predicted to win. Instead, the conservative Jamaican Labour Party (JLP) won by a slim margin, buoyed by a campaign platform of “prosperity for all,” in part through a promised tax break for a large swath of lower-income workers.

April 13, 2017 View PDF

Iconic Jamaican beach vanishing as pollution, climate change take a toll trust.org

Iconic Jamaican beach vanishing as pollution, climate change take a toll

Pollution and warmer temperatures have killed reefs off the shore of Hellshire Beach, allowing waves to pound it and wash away the sand.

Fighting for sex assault victims, Jamaican activist accused of crossing legal line trust.org

Fighting for sex assault victims, Jamaican activist accused of crossing legal line

Women's rights activist arrested after she is accused of naming alleged sexual predators on social media.

March 22, 2017 Go to Article

Fighting for sex assault victims, Jamaican activist accused of crossing legal line Reuters

Fighting for sex assault victims, Jamaican activist accused of crossing legal line

When Jamaican police made an arrest last week under the nation's cyber crime laws, the identity of the suspect took many by surprise - a women's rights activist accused of publicly naming alleged sexual predators on social media.

March 22, 2017 Go to Article

A #lifeinleggings: Caribbean women's movement fights sex assaults, harassment news.trust.org

A #lifeinleggings: Caribbean women's movement fights sex assaults, harassment

"For too long, we have been too quiet. We can't keep doing things the same way and expect the different results."

March 10, 2017 Go to Article

FEATURE-Jamaican LGBTQ youths escape persecution in city storm drains trust.org

FEATURE-Jamaican LGBTQ youths escape persecution in city storm drains

"Every day, it's life or death" Kaci was always what she calls a "girlie boy." Growing up in her grandmother's house in Kingston, Jamaica, that was not a problem. But when her grandmother died and her uncle became her guardian, being a "girlie boy" meant trouble.

March 1, 2017 Go to Article

Jamaican women harassed as they "wait in vain" for justice on police shootings - report trust.org

Jamaican women harassed as they "wait in vain" for justice on police shootings - report

By Rebekah Kebede KINGSTON, Nov 25 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Jamaican women bear the brunt of a "culture of fear" intended to intimidate families and stop them seeking justice for thousands of extrajudicial police killings on the Caribbean island, according to a report from a human rights group.

Activists call on Obama to pardon Marcus Garvey before he leaves office Quartz

Activists call on Obama to pardon Marcus Garvey before he leaves office

Martin Luther King called Marcus Garvey the first man "to give millions of Negroes a sense of dignity and destiny." His philosophy of black self-determination influenced black leaders from Nelson Mandela to Jomo Kenyatta to Malcolm X. At a time when lynchings still occurred, Garvey was a firebrand who turned soapbox speeches on a Harlem...

Nov. 13, 2016 Go to Article

Collards vs. Kale: Why Only One Supergreen Is a Superstar nationalgeographic.com

Collards vs. Kale: Why Only One Supergreen Is a Superstar

Ira Wallace knows people think collard greens aren't sexy. "It's your grandmother's food-it's not so exciting and classy," says Wallace, co-owner of the cooperative Southern Exposure Seed Exchange. That's why, when doing cooking demonstrations, she doesn't initially reveal that it's the ingredient of her wildly popular "Brazilian greens."

Oct. 12, 2016 Go to Article

Poisoning the In-laws - Breakfast in Jamaica Extra Crispy

Poisoning the In-laws - Breakfast in Jamaica

As I watched my in-laws pile food onto their plates, I imagined the possible headline the next day: "Fatal brunch: U.S. woman poisons in-laws." The story of how I had accidentally murdered my husband's parents would, of course, be paired with an unflattering mugshot.

Aug. 29, 2016 Go to Article

Who Owns Kale? nationalgeographic.com

Who Owns Kale?

Kale is the “it” green, over all things lettuce, collard, and calloo. It even has its own hashtag: #kaleyeah! But why?

Aug. 10, 2016 Go to Article

A Man Booker prize author is working on an African 'Game of Thrones' inspired by ancient empires Quartz

A Man Booker prize author is working on an African 'Game of Thrones' inspired by ancient empires

Treasure Beach, Jamaica For the last year and a half novelist Marlon James has been sifting through "boring" academic history books, doing research on African kingdoms, from the Benin Empire to the Solomonic dynasty, for his next book, dubbed the "African Game of Thrones." James became the first Jamaican to win the Man Booker Prize last year and said he considers himself a big fan and student of African literature. James' brief mention of his new project, Black Leopard, Red Wolf, late last year sparked tons of interest. Apparently, there are lots of Afrophile "Game of Thrones" fans.

June 10, 2016 Go to Article

Sometimes Paradise Goes Unpaved - Roads & Kingdoms roadsandkingdoms.com

Sometimes Paradise Goes Unpaved - Roads & Kingdoms

We had assumed for years that Winnifred was dead. Fenced off, manicured, paved over. It couldn't be helped. That's the way of the world, we said. The little guy always loses.

June 7, 2016 Go to Article

More to Jamaica than 'anti-gay Gestapos': Man Booker winner Marlon James Reuters

More to Jamaica than 'anti-gay Gestapos': Man Booker winner Marlon James

TREASURE BEACH, Jamaica Living as a closeted gay man in Jamaica drove novelist Marlon James to such despair that he once wrote he knew he had to leave "in a plane or a coffin." He left, on a plane for the United States, seemingly confirming Time magazine's 2006 headline that the Caribbean island was "The Most Homophobic Place on Earth." Back for the Calabash International Literary Festival, which features poets, novelists and writers from across the globe, the 2015 Man Booker Prize winner said his own story was actually more complicated.

June 7, 2016 Go to Article

In the Caribbean, crossing borders by land and sea for safe abortions trust.org

In the Caribbean, crossing borders by land and sea for safe abortions

While abortion is legal in countries such as Guyana, Cuba, Barbados and the Caribbean Netherlands, it is illegal or highly restricted in other areas

May 26, 2016 Go to Article

An Ethiopian prince's visit to Jamaica relives the birth of Rastafarianism Quartz

An Ethiopian prince's visit to Jamaica relives the birth of Rastafarianism

Kingston, Jamaica It was a rainy April day in 1966 when Emperor Haile Selassie came to Jamaica. As his plane landed, the rain stopped, and the tarmac was mobbed with people. The crowd shoved security forces out of the way, and official protocol had to be scrapped. Inside the plane, the Emperor waited for half an hour, surprised and overwhelmed by the enthusiastic welcome. That visit 50 years ago is the stuff of legend, retold again and again. For Rastafarians, it was a visit from a man they consider divine. For newly independent Jamaica it was the visit of an African king.

April 30, 2016 Go to Article

Former Jamaican 'Gangster' Says Literacy May Be the Best Way to Fight Crime GOOD

Former Jamaican 'Gangster' Says Literacy May Be the Best Way to Fight Crime

This story is part of an ongoing campaign called the Alphabet of Illiteracy. By using letters themselves-the foundation of reading and writing- Project Literacy examines the ways illiteracy underpins some of the greatest challenges facing the world today. Below, we explore the letter B for "bloodshed." Growing up in Bob Marley's Trench Town neighborhood, David Chang always knew what he wanted to be when he grew up. "I wanted to become a badman. That was my dream," Chang says. And he did, although his career as a "badman" (Jamaican slang for "gangster") was short-lived.

March 29, 2016 Go to Article

Jamaica slow to put women in positions of political power, UN report says trust.org

Jamaica slow to put women in positions of political power, UN report says

By Rebekah Kebede KINGSTON, Jamaica, March 9 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Jamaican women are largely cut off from positions of political power and need affirmative action as well as commitment from political parties to boost opportunities and train women for leadership, according to a United Nations report. Despite having had some prominent women leaders such as former Prime Minister Portia Simpson-Miller, the Caribbean island falls short of its own target of having women in 30 percent of decision-making positions, said the report by the U.N. Development Program (UNDP). Women make up just 20 percent of Jamaica's cabinet ministers, senators and mayors, it said.

March 16, 2016 Go to Article

Jamaicans hope to ease grip of violence by ending gender stereotypes trust.org

Jamaicans hope to ease grip of violence by ending gender stereotypes

KINGSTON, March 7 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Be tough. Don't have feelings. Be a man and fight! Such are the messages drilled into Jamaican boys at an early age that have helped push the island nation's murder rate up 20 percent last year to a five-year high, according to a campaign trying to stem the violence by fighting gender stereotypes. The campaign, the Next GENDERation Initiative, aims to reach and teach young people living in the nation that is gripped by violent crime that has frustrated its economic development.

March 7, 2016 Go to Article

Jamaican opposition winning photo-finish general election, provisional results show Reuters

Jamaican opposition winning photo-finish general election, provisional results show

KINGSTON Provisional results showed Jamaica's opposition party narrowly winning a general election on Thursday, with promises of jobs and hefty tax cuts that appealed to voters weary of the current government's IMF-mandated austerity measures. The Jamaican Labour Party won or was ahead in 34 of 63 parliamentary seats with almost all the votes counted, the electoral commission website showed. Prime Minister Portia Simpson-Miller's People's National Party had been predicted to win, but polls had tightened in the last week. The PNP took 29 parliamentary seats, the provisional results showed. (Reporting by Rebekah Kebede; Editing by Bernard Orr)

Feb. 25, 2016 Go to Article

This has to be the catchiest dancehall tune ever about a mosquito-borne virus Public Radio International

This has to be the catchiest dancehall tune ever about a mosquito-borne virus

Zika has arrived in Jamaica and the island is fighting it in a uniquely Caribbean style: with dancehall beats and air horns. "All di people dem weh nuh want ZIKV hol up yu han!" (All the people who don't want ZikV, hold up your hands!) begins " We nuh want Zik V," which has to be the catchiest dancehall tune ever about a mosquito-borne virus. The patois-heavy song calls for Jamaicans to "mash up all mosquito breeding site," "go hard" on mosquitoes, and make sure there's "no stagnant water in sight."

Jamaica's Crumbling Water Infrastructure Is an Economic Disaster The Atlantic's CityLab

Jamaica's Crumbling Water Infrastructure Is an Economic Disaster

Sitting at the foothills of the Blue Mountains, Jamaica's capital doesn't look like it has a water problem. The city is full of the lush foliage you'd expect in the tropics: green palms, birds of paradise, bougainvillea.

Dec. 10, 2015 Go to Article

In the Caribbean, a stinking seaweed menace spurs invention Thomson Reuters Foundation

In the Caribbean, a stinking seaweed menace spurs invention

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Nov 17 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - An unwelcome visitor sailed onto Caribbean beaches this year: huge rafts of seaweed. The seaweed, called sargassum, has swept into the region in part as a result of changing weather conditions, turning many once-postcard-perfect beaches a dull pond-scum brown as it decomposes and releases a rotten egg stench. "It's a dirty horrible brown lace that just washes ashore," said Noorani Azeez, CEO of the Saint Lucia Hotel and Tourism Association. "The foul stench of the seaweed is really an inhibitor to going (to the beach) with your family."

Nov. 12, 2015 Go to Article

Legacy of Caribbean slavery still stings despite British PM saying "move on" Thomson Reuters Foundation

Legacy of Caribbean slavery still stings despite British PM saying "move on"

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Oct 1 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - After a long time wondering, Verene Shepherd took a DNA test last year and finally learned that her mother's family came from Cameroon in West Africa. "How did Cameroonians reach over here? They never came over here voluntarily," said Shepherd, a Jamaican who heads the country's National Commission on Reparations. Her ancestors were likely among the millions of Africans brought to the Caribbean to work on plantations, so she was disappointed when British Prime Minister David Cameron this week said he would like to "move on" instead of apologizing.

Oct. 12, 2015 Go to Article

Layoffs and empty streets as Australia's boom towns go bust Reuters

Layoffs and empty streets as Australia's boom towns go bust

PERTH When Probo Junio got a visa to work in Australia, he thought he had won a ticket to the good life. In 2013, the 45-year-old boilermaker left his hometown of Cebu in the Philippines, where he was getting paid about $10 a day, to work in Karratha in Western Australia for $30 an hour. Enough to support his relatives and build a new life Down Under. What Junio didn't expect was that Australia's booming resources industry would go bust less than two years later, taking his job, and leaving him just 60 days to find work or go home.

March 6, 2015 Go to Article

Travel Postcard: 48 hours in Perth, Australia's coastal boomtown Reuters

Travel Postcard: 48 hours in Perth, Australia's coastal boomtown

PERTH The hometown of Australia's richest citizen, mining magnate Gina Rinehart, Perth is the centre of the country's iron ore and oil and gas boom. with some of the largest resources firms churning out billions in profits here. But Perth has a laid back side too-- there's a saying that W.A., the acronym for Western Australia, actually stands for "wait awhile." And why not take it easy in this city with a sunny Mediterranean climate and miles and miles of coastline where even on a busy summer weekend, you have a good chance of having a big stretch of beach all to yourself.

Nov. 23, 2012 Go to Article

World's fastest radio telescope starts up in Australian outback Barrington Courier-Review

World's fastest radio telescope starts up in Australian outback

MURCHISON, Australia (Reuters) - In the remote Australian outback, scientists have launched the world's fastest radio telescope which will exponentially increase astronomers' ability to survey the universe, mapping black holes and shedding new light on the origins of galaxies. The Australia Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), with an array of 36 antennas each 12 meters (40 feet) across, started peering into the universe on Friday from a far-flung cattle station in Western Australia state. The A$152 million ($155.18 million) telescope will "listen" to radio waves from the cosmos that might give astronomers insights into the beginnings of the universe.

Oct. 3, 2012 Go to Article

Tiny Australia town wants A$100 mln for hosting Xstrata mine Chicago Tribune

Tiny Australia town wants A$100 mln for hosting Xstrata mine

PERTH, Aug 9 (Reuters) - An Australian hamlet is askingXstrata to pay it at least A$100 million ($106 million)if the global mining giant decides to proceed with amulti-billion coal mine in the area. Wandoan, home to just 380 people, is one of a growing numberof small towns that risk being overwhelmed by Australia'sfast-paced mining boom. The hamlet is a five hour drive fromBrisbane and in the middle of farming and cattle-grazingcountry. Mining firms often pay communities a token amount beforecommencing on projects, but industry experts said the amountWandoan was requesting was unusual.

Aug. 8, 2012 Go to Article

Questions Remain After Landslide Disaster Huffington Post

Questions Remain After Landslide Disaster

Landslide swept over quarry used for Exxon gas project * Independent expert had raised safety concerns * Call for thorough, independent inquiry * Concerns over unrest among local landowners By Rebekah Kebede March 6 (Reuters) - A deadly landslide in the mountains of Papua New Guinea, near where U.S. oil major Exxon Mobil is building a $15.7 billion gas project, is raising fresh questions about the global energy industry's scramble for ever harder-to-reach resources. The landslide tore through a quarry used by Exxon in January, killing at least 25 people in the poor South Pacific country, but it has stirred little international publicity, even though an expert report had questioned the safety of the excavations.

March 5, 2012 Go to Article

In outback Australia, dongas show costs of mining boom Reuters

In outback Australia, dongas show costs of mining boom

KARRATHA, Australia, April 20 Demand for Australian commodities is running white-hot. So too are costs in the country's remote mining towns, to the point where tiny huts or "dongas" can cost as much as a five-star hotel room and backpackers can earn $2,000 a week cleaning them. Costs are becoming a big headache for Australian miners, including giants Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton , which complain that labour shortages, a strong local currency and rising fuel prices threaten to slow the pace of expansion. The problem is clearly visible in the remote mining town of Karratha, a gateway to mines in the barren northwest.

April 19, 2011 Go to Article